Articles Tagged ‘20mph - Brake the road safety charity’

‘GO 20’ interactive quiz launched to promote the benefits of 20mph limits

30th November 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive e-learning resource to promote the benefits of 20mph limits, and to raise awareness about the importance of people in cars slowing down around homes, schools and shops to protect more vulnerable road users. The ‘GO 20’ interactive resource can be used by community groups, educators, road safety professionals, or anyone who wants to find out more about how 20mph limits can benefit their community.

As shown in Brake’srecent research on 20mph limits, reducing limits from 30 to 20mph has been shown to reduce casualties [1] because drivers have more time to react to unexpected events and emergencies. At 30mph, if a child runs out three car lengths ahead, you will hit the child at almost full speed, with a high chance of killing or injuring them. At 20mph you should be able to stop in time. Children also benefit from slower speed limits because they struggle to judge the speed of vehicles over 20mph, so often make mistakes crossing roads with faster traffic [2].

A 2014 Brake survey found that eight in 10 people (78%) think 20mph should be the norm around schools, on residential streets, and in village, town and city centres [3]. Brake is calling on local authorities to listen to public opinion and implement widespread 20mph limits in their own areas [4]; and on drivers to slow down to 20mph to keep vulnerable road users safe.

The open-access ‘GO 20’ resource challenges users to test their understanding of 20mph limits, and can be used to facilitate discussion and present the facts on the importance of drivers slowing their speed. Brake is especially encouraging community campaigners to use the‘GO 20’ resource to raise public awareness and inspire local authorities to introduce 20mph limits in their areas.

Access the resource online now atbrake.org.uk/go20interactive.

Gary Rae, director of communications and campaigns said: “Everyone should be able to walk and cycle in their communities without being put in danger. Reducing speed limits from 30 to 20mph where we live, work and play protects the most vulnerable – children, older people, disabled people and anyone on bicycle or on foot. Brake’s new ‘GO 20’ e-learning resource shows the benefits of driving more slowly. It’s a powerful tool that demonstrates how 20mph limits put people first, creating safer streets and healthier, happier communities. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, campaigners and educators to help them talk about a really important issue, because the fact is, speed kills.”

The facts

Every day five children and 20 adults are killed or seriously injured while walking or cycling on UK roads [5]. Every casualty is devastating.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes and casualties. Reducing traffic speeds is crucial to road safety. It has been estimated that for every 1mph reduction in average speeds on urban streets, crash rates fall by an average of 6% [6].

The faster they drive, the less chance drivers have of being able to stop in time in an emergency. And if they can’t stop in time, they will hit with greater impact, increasing the chances of causing serious injury or death. A vehicle travelling at 20mph (32km/h) can stop in time to avoid a child running out three car-lengths in front. The same vehicle travelling at 30mph (48km/h) will not be able to stop in time, and will still be travelling at 28mph (45km/h) when they hit the child [7].

When traffic is slower and roads are safer, people feel much freer to run, walk or cycle. Brake surveys have found that three in four schoolchildren (76%) would like to walk and cycle more, but worry that they might be run over while doing so [8]; and that three in four (74%) UK parents say their family would walk more if the safety of nearby roads was improved [9].

When traffic is slowed to 20mph in communities, research shows people are friendlier with their neighbours, feel safer in their area, and take part in more community activities [10][11].

Read more atwww.brake.org.uk/facts and download ourresearch report on 20mph limits.

Brake’s campaigns

Through itsGO 20 campaign, Brake is part of a broad coalition of charities calling for 20mph limits to become the norm in our cities, towns and villages. Ultimately, we want the government to change the national default urban speed limit from 30 to 20mph. In the meantime, we are calling on local authorities to GO 20 by implementing widespread 20mph limits in their own areas; and on drivers to help make our roads safer by slowing down to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops, even where the limit is still 30mph.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

With many thanks to Rod King, Founder & Campaign Director of 20's Plenty (www.20splenty.org), for his assistance with the interactive resource.

[1]20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001

[2]Reduced sensitivity to visual looming inflates the risk posed by speeding vehicles when children try to cross the road, University of London, 2011

[3]Eight in 10 back 20mph limits as charity takes campaign to parliament, Brake, 2014

[4]GO 20: Towards changing the urban default speed limit to 20mph, Brake, 2015

[5]Reported road casualties Great Britain 2014 annual report, Department for Transport, 2015

[6] Speed, Speed Limits and Accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994

[7] Stopping distances,The Highway Code, Driving Standards Agency, 2015

[8]Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake and webuyanycar.com, 2014

[9]Bereaved family back Beep Beep! initiative for safer roads for kids as survey reveals parents’ fears from fast traffic, Brake and Churchill, 2012

[10] Hart, J. and Parkhurst, G.,Driven to excess: Impacts of motor vehicles on the quality of life of residents of three streets in Bristol UK, World Transport Policy & Practice, 17 (2), 2011

[11]The contribution of good public spaces to social integration in urban neighbourhoods, Swiss Natural Science Foundation, 2006

As children head back to school we reveal the extent of dangerous speeding in 20mph areas

  • Four in 10 (40%) of drivers admit to ‘sometimes’ breaking the speed limit by at least 10mph
  • More than a quarter of drivers ‘regularly’ speed in areas designed to keep children (and other vulnerable road users) safe

A new survey by Brake and Direct Line has revealed how many drivers are speeding on roads where lower limits are in place to keep children and other road users safe.

Four in 10 (40%) of drivers admit they sometimes travel at 30mph or more where there is a limit of 20mph. More than a quarter (26%) of drivers say they do this at least once a month and just over one in five (21%) admits to driving much faster than the 20mph speed limit on a weekly basis. Most 20mph zones and areas are in the vicinity of schools and homes where many children will be regularly walking and cycling.

In 2014, 53 children under 16 were killed and 2,029 were seriously injured on British roads: that’s almost six children seriously hurt or killed every day. The majority (80%) were on foot or bicycle at the time.[i] 

Speed limits are put in place to keep all road users safe, especially vulnerable ones like children, and can make the difference between life and death. If a child runs into the road three car lengths ahead, a driver travelling at 30mph will not be able to stop in time, and will still be travelling at 28mph when they hit the child. A driver travelling at 20mph should just be able to stop in time, providing they are paying attention, have well-maintained brakes, and are driving in dry conditions.

There is plenty of evidence to show that lowering traffic speeds, and lowering limits to 20mph specifically, reduces casualties and creates a safer road environment, especially for those on foot and bicycle, but of course this only works if limits are adhered to. 

Analysis of 75 20mph limit sites in Scotland found casualties dropped by 42%.[ii] The World Health Organisation recommends 20mph limits as a key measure to improve pedestrian safety and save lives.[iv]

Case study

Tommy Kenny was just 10 years old when he was tragically knocked down and killed on a pedestrian crossing on a 30mph road in London. He was thrown approximately 60ft on impact, leaving him with multiple traumatic injuries so severe that he stood no chance of survival. The police investigator said that the driver was doing between 30-39mph when he hit Tommy. If the limit had been set to 20mph rather than 30mph, Tommy might still be here today.

Tommy's aunt, Michelle Kirby, said: “Tommy was a much loved son, brother, grandson, nephew and cousin with the best years of his life ahead of him. Our lives fell apart when he died and he is missed hugely by his whole family. He was a very bright, fun-loving and cheeky boy with a unique personality and a vivid imagination. He loved dinosaurs, Steven Gerrard and Doctor Who. 
If we are honest with ourselves, most people have to admit to creeping over the speed limit at times. Yet we've all seen the harrowing adverts on TV showing the horrific results of what speed can do to a child. If you drive at 20mph, you have a good chance of being able to stop in time if you need to, such as if a child runs out in front of you. We all need to slow down, and we can all do that today. One can only imagine what pain Tommy's parents, Lynsey and Lloyd, have gone through and will do for the rest of their lives.”

Alice Bailey, campaigns advisor for Brake, the road safety charity, said: “All parents want to know their children are safe while travelling to and from school and playing outdoors. Speed limits are in place to keep all road users safe and if tragedy strikes and a child is hit by a car, the speed at which it is travelling could be the difference between life and death. 20mph limits benefit our communities in so many ways, keeping them safer, cleaner and greener; when limits are lower, many more people choose to ditch the car completely and walk and cycle instead[CF1] . If people feel they have to drive, the lower speed limit will have a negligible impact on travel times and bring so many other positive effects.”

Rob Miles, director of car insurance at Direct Line, said: "Adhering to the speed limit is such a simple way of helping to make our roads safer and is within all drivers’ gift. We urge drivers to be conscientious and to remember that speed limits exist for very good reasons and that it is a legal requirement to observe them.”

Q.1 Within the past year, have you driven at 30mph or faster in a 20mph speed limit?

No, never                                            60

Yes, less than once a month              14

Yes, about once a month                      5       

Yes, about once a week                       8

Yes, several times a week                    9

Yes, once a day or more                      4

Q.2 Within the past year, have you driven at 40mph or faster in a 30mph speed limit?

No, never                                            60

Yes, less than once a month              16

Yes, about once a month                      4

Yes, about once a week                       8

Yes, several times a week                    9

Yes, once a day or more                      3

 

Notes to Editors:

Tommy’s mum Lynsey is available for interview

Please contact Alice at Brake on 01484 550063 or on abailey@brake.org.uk

Or email the news inbox on news@brake.org.uk

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Direct Line

Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or on-line.

Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by U K Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England and Wales No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc.

Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0345 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com


[i] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015, table RAS30062

[ii] 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001

[iv] Pedestrian safety: a road safety manual for decision-makers and practitioners, World Health Organisation, 2013

Beep Beep! Day: fundraising

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. The money you raise supports this vital work.

Funds raised for Brake through events such as Beep Beep! Day help us to support bereaved and injured victims of road crashes, to campaign on various issues including for 20mph limits and crossings in communities.

Fundraising ideas for Beep Beep! Days

There are many ways you can raise money for Brake as part of your Beep Beep! Day event. Below are a few examples of fundraisers that other organisations have run and you can find more examples on our fundraising pages:

  • Have a bake sale! Baking is back in fashion and is an easy way for children to raise money for Brake. Make your favourite cupcakes or try our traffic light biscuit recipe and then sell them to parents, staff and pupils.
  • Hold a bring-and-buy sale or fun day and invite parents and local residents to have a stall or attend on the day, with proceeds going towards Brake.
  • Have a fun dress-down day! Encourage all the children to come to school dressed in bright clothes and donate a pound to raise money for Brake.
  • Play 'name the teddy' and give children the chance to win a cute teddy bear. Download our Name-the-bear Sheet; choose a name for the bear and seal it in an envelope. Charge £2 per guess. When the sheet is complete, announce the winner, who wins the teddy and donate the funds to Brake.
  • Guess how many sweets are in a jar.  Find a glass bottle; fill it with sweets of your choice, decorate
    with a ribbon and make it look attractive, count the sweets and seal the answer in an envelope. Charge £2 per guess. When the sheet is complete, announce the winner, who wins the sweets and donate the funds to Brake.

How your fundraising can make a difference:

£10 allows Brake to provide a free picture book for a child who has been bereaved in a road crash, to help them begin understand their loss, and guidance to their carers

£50 enables us to operate our helpline for an hour, supporting people affected by road crashes

£150 enables Brake to train 20 people to become campaigners for road safety in their community

£450 helps Brake to coordinate a road safety media campaign in a local community to help make their roads safer

pdf-bookFunds also help us produce resources such as our 'Someone has died in a road crash books' (pictured), which help children who have suffered the death of a loved one in a road crash. To order a copy, call 01484 559909 or email admin@brake.org.uk. You can also go to www.suddendeath.org, a Brake project committed to sharing best practice research and resources for professionals working with people affected by sudden bereavement. 

Return to the main Beep Beep! Day page.

 

 

Brake responds to Scotland's 20mph Consultation

A proposal for a Bill to replace the current 30mph default speed limit on restricted roads with a 20mph limit. Consultation by Mark Ruskell MSP, Member for Mid Scotland and Fife

Response from Brake, the road safety charity, September 2017

5. Which of the following best expresses your view of the proposal to replace the current 30mph default speed limit on restricted roads with a 20mph limit?

Fully supportive.

Please explain the reasons for your response.

Brake fully supports changing Scotland’s current 30mph default speed limit on restricted roads to 20mph because it offers an opportunity to save lives, promote sustainable transport and improve the environment.

Excessive speed is a major contributory factor in road crashes, resulting in death and serious injury. In 2015, "travelling too fast for conditions" and "exceeding the speed limit" were contributory factors in 19% of fatal crashes and 11% of all reported road crashes in Scotland [1]. Excessive speed is also a significant problem for UK road traffic enforcement officers: in 2015-16 alone, 32% of Scottish motoring offences were classified as speeding offences (54,419 offences) [2].

At slower speeds, drivers have more time to identify potential hazards and take action to avoid them [3,4]. At 20mph, the average stopping distance is 12 metres, rising to 23 metres at 30mph according to the UK Highway Code [5], although new research from Brake/TRL suggests these distances are underestimated [6]. In addition, if a vehicle is travelling at a slower speed before a crash, the energy involved in the impact is much lower, and much less damage is caused by the crash [7].

As well as inflicting horrendous suffering, every road death is estimated to cost the economy £1.8 million [8]. Fewer casualties mean less strain on the NHS and emergency services, and less emotional and financial devastation for families [9]. A study in Wales suggested that introducing 20mph limits on roads classified as 30mph could prevent 6-10 road deaths and 1203-1978 casualties annually, saving an estimated £58-94 million per year in Welsh public health costs [10]. 

Reducing casualties isn’t the only public health benefit of a default 20mph limit. Slower traffic speed makes people feel safer, which encourages more walking and cycling. Surveys of public attitudes towards traffic speeds carried out in Edinburgh before and after the implementation of a 20mph limit, showed that the percentage of respondents expressing a level of concern for traffic speeds fell from 32% in the ‘before’ survey to 24% in the ‘after’ survey. Analysis of cyclists’ attitudes showed that they were significantly less likely to be concerned about traffic speeds after 20mph speed limits had been introduced [11]. In April 2013, the All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Group recommended the “widespread extension of 20mph speed limits as the default value in urban streets” to increase cycling [12].  More people walking and cycling means less motorised traffic on the roads and less pollution from vehicle emissions.

More walking and cycling means better health and prevention of illnesses like heart disease and diabetes, and greater savings for the taxpayer [13]. Lower speed limits can also help local businesses, especially in ailing town centres, by increasing footfall. In financial terms, the introduction of 20mph limits has widespread benefits and pays for itself many times over [14].

In short, there are numerous benefits to the introduction of a default 20mph limit where people live - including improved road safety, public health and sustainable transport, and less strain on the NHS and other public services.

Footnotes:

[1] In 2015, ‘travelling too fast for conditions’ and ‘exceeding the speed limit’ were contributory factors in 19% fatal crashes and 11% road crashes in Scotland (RRC Scotland 2015, Transport Scotland, 2016).
[2] Recorded crime in Scotland 2015-16, Scottish government, Group 7, 2016.
[3] Average road crashes could fall by 4-6% per 1mph reduction in vehicle speed [Taylor, M. C., et al., The effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, TRL, 2000].
[4] Transport Scotland, Good practice guide on 20mph speed restrictions, 2016
[5] Department for Transport, UK Highway Code Rule 126: stopping distances, updated 2017
[6] Cuerden, R., The mechanics of emergency braking, Brake & TRL, 2017 http://www.brake.org.uk/media-centre/1748-new-figures-show-highway-code-falls-short-on-stopping-distances
[7] Khorasani-Zavareh D. et al, Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action, 2015.
[8] Department for Transport, Reported road casualties GB: Annual report 2015, 2015, RAS60001
[9] Jones, S. & Brunt, H., Twenty miles per hour speed limits: a sustainable health solution to public health problems in Wales, British Medical Journal, 2017
[10] Jones, S. & Brunt, H., Twenty miles per hour speed limits: a sustainable health solution to public health problems in Wales, British Medical Journal, 2017
[11] City of Edinburgh Council, Before and After: Research into the implementation of 20mph speed limits in South Edinburgh, 2013
[12] All-party Parliamentary Cycling Group, Get Britain Cycling, 2013
[13] Department of Health, Start Active, Stay Active: A report on physical activity from the four home countries’ Chief Medical Officers, 2011
[14] Living Streets, The pedestrian pound: business case for better streets and places, 2015

6. Could the aims of the proposal be better delivered in another way (without a Bill in the Scottish Parliament?

No

Please explain the reasons for your response.

The Scottish Parliament is responsible for setting the country’s speed limits and must take a central leadership role if the full benefits of 20mph speed limits (as outlined in the response to question 5) are to be realised. According to the World Health Organization: “Responsible and accountable road safety leadership at country, state, provincial and city levels is vital to success” [1], while the OECD highlights the importance of leadership to achieve a paradigm shift towards a ‘safe systems’ approach to road safety [2].

Local authorities can use traffic regulation orders (TROs) to implement 20mph limits and zones [3], but the introduction and enforcement of 20mph speed limits has been described as ‘limited’, with many authorities said to lack the necessary resources and leadership to do so [4].

Evidence suggests that without central Government backing, the implementation of 20mph speed limits will be varied and inconsistent [4,5]. Without legislative support, the process for introducing 20mph limits and zones to urban areas is too complex and expensive for many local authorities [6]. Legislation is needed to simplify implementation of a default 20mph speed limit and to reduce costs and confusion for local officials and Transport Scotland [6].

Footnotes:

[1] WHO, Save LIVES: a road safety technical package, 2017
[2] International transport forum, Zero deaths and serious injuries: leading a paradigm shift to a safe system, OECD, 2016
[3] Parliament UK, Roads: traffic regulation orders (SN6013), 2014
[4] Steer Davies Gleave, Research into the effectiveness of 20mph speed limits and zones, London Borough of Merton, 2014
[5] Transport Scotland has already part-funded the City of Edinburgh council’s 20mph scheme that covers 80% of the roads in the city centre (City of Edinburgh Council, Before and After: Research into the implementation of 20mph speed limits in South Edinburgh, 2013)
[6] PACTS, Road safety since 2010,  2015 – indicates the need for consistent, government-led speed management policies instead of localised approach.

7. What do you think would be the main advantages, if any, of the proposal?

There are significant benefits to the proposal, outlined in our response to question 5, including improved road safety, public health and sustainable transport.

Towns, villages and other residential areas should be places where anyone can travel unimpeded in a safe and pleasant environment. The introduction of default 20mph speed limits helps create shared spaces that are healthier, greener and safer [1]. Lower speed limits encourage people to be more active, cycling and walking short journeys, and improving their fitness, health and wellbeing [2,3].

Speed is a significant contributor to road crashes, and reducing speed offers a major opportunity to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, especially among vulnerable road users including cyclists, pedestrians and children [4] [5].

Speeding traffic also has a negative impact on air quality, noise pollution levels and the ‘liveability’ of an area [6].

A 20mph speed limit suited to the local environment can result in smoother journeys with less vehicle idling, which contributes to air pollution; it’s important to cut unnecessary pollution in places where people live and work, including residential areas and near schools and hospitals [7].

Slower speeds can also benefit the economically disadvantaged as low-income housing is often located close to busy roads; slower traffic means more people can travel through their community without fear of the road [8].

Footnotes

[1] Baster, N. et al, Achieving safety, sustainability and health goals in transport, PACTS, 2015
[2] Public Health England, Working together to promote active travel: a briefing for local authorities, 2016
[3] Jones, S., Brunt, H. 2017 Twenty miles per hour speed limits: a sustainable solution for public health problems in Wales, Journal of Epidemiology and Health, 10.
[4] Studies suggest that until the age of 14 children lack the cognitive reasoning to cross the road safely (Plumert, 2017).
[5] Cohen J, Boniface S, Watkins S. Health implications of transport planning, development and operations. J Transport Health, 2014;1:63–72
[6] TravelWest, Essential evidence: No 159 What could a switch from 30mph to 20mph achieve across a whole country’s population, 2017
[7] Transport and environment analysis group, An evaluation of the estimated impacts on vehicle emissions of a 20mph speed restriction in central London: final report, Imperial College London, 2013
[8] RoSPA, Social factors in road safety: policy paper, 2012

8. What do you think would be the main disadvantages, if any, of the proposal?

N/A

9. What measures do you think would be needed to maximise compliance with the new national speed limit on restricted roads? (Examples might include advertising, signage or police enforcement)

The Scottish Government should introduce this policy with an educational/awareness-raising advertising campaign, supported by a nuanced, evidence-based road safety strategy with targets to maximise driver compliance and road user safety [1-4]. A parallel crackdown on enforcement in selected 20mph areas, for example by police patrols and speed cameras is also required [5].

Footnotes

[1] WHO, Save LIVES: a road safety technical package, 2017
[2] International transport forum, Zero deaths and serious injuries: leading a paradigm shift to a safe system, OECD, 2016
[3] Ciaburro, T. & Spencer, J., Seizing the opportunity: safer roads, PACTS, 2017
[4] Brake, Inspire, inform, engage: Developing a pragmatic approach to road safety and sustainable transport interventions, 2017
[5] Owen et al., The effectiveness of average speed cameras in Great Britain, RAC Foundation, 2016.

Financial implication

10. Taking account of both the costs and potential savings, what financial impact would you expect the Bill to have on:

a). the Scottish Government:

Some increase in cost

b). Local authorities:

Broadly cost neutral

c). Motorists:

Broadly cost neutral

d). Other road users and members of the public:

Significant reduction in cost

e). Other public services (e.g. NHS, Fire and Rescue Services etc.)

Significant reduction in cost

Please explain the reasons for your response.

The Scottish Government: Could experience an increase in costs during the initial stages of implementing a default 20mph limit, as repeater signs are removed (or added for 30mph zones). In the long-run, however, the government stands to make significant savings by preventing road deaths and serious injury. Fatal crashes cost Scotland £332.8 million in 2015; crashes resulting in serious injuries cost £351.9 million; and in total road crashes cost Scotland £1,130.2 million in 2015 [1].

Local authorities:Could experience a slight increase in costs if they adapt the local road infrastructure to reflect the new limit or install speed cameras to enforce new speed limits [2]; however, local authorities will no longer have to spend money on repeater signs for 20mph zones [3] and the income generated from new speed cameras could be used to fund local road safety initiatives [4].

Motorists:A largely cost neutral group, although there are financial benefits of fewer crashes, more reliable journey times and associated costs [5].

Other road users:Could experience a significant reduction in cost. A smaller number of crashes means that fewer families are likely to experience the death of a salary-earning loved one in a road crash [6].

Public services: Reduction in costs due to fewer emergency services call-outs to attend road crashes and treat victims. Lower speed limits could also encourage more people to engage with public transport options, potentially increasing local funding for these services [7].

Footnotes

[1] Reported Road Casualties: Scotland 2015, Transport Scotland, 2016
[2] City of Edinburgh Council’s 20mph scheme covered 80% of the city and estimated to cost £2.2 million (City of Edinburgh Council, Objections to Traffic Regulation Order TRO/15/17 20mph Speed Limit – Various Roads, Edinburgh, Transport and environment committee, 2016)
[3] Statutory instruments 2016 No.362: Traffic signs, regulations and general directions 2016, gov.uk, 2016
[4] Owen et al., The effectiveness of average speed cameras in Great Britain, RAC Foundation, 2016
[5] Department for Transport, Accident and casualty costs, RAS60, 2016.
[6] Wedlock, E & Tapley, J., What works in supporting victims of crime: a rapid evidence assessment, 2016 
[7] Transport for London, Safe streets for London: The road safety action plan for London 2020, 2013

11. Do you believe there will be any other benefits to reducing the speed limit from 30mph to 20mph?

Please refer to the responses to questions 5 and 7.

Equalities

12. What overall impact is the proposed Bill likely to have on equality, taking account of the following protected characteristics (under the Equality Act 2010): age, disability, gender re-assignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race and belief, sex, sexual orientation?

Slightly positive

Please explain the reasons for your response

There is a significant body of evidence worldwide suggesting that people in disadvantaged socioeconomic groups are more likely to be involved in a road crash [1]. The introduction of a lower default speed limit could help disadvantaged groups by increasing road safety generally in the places where they work and live [2].

In addition, safer roads in communities would help make shared spaces more accessible to those with disabilities or limited movement due to illness or age [3].

Footnotes

[1] WHO, Global status report on road safety: 2015, 2016
[2] Steinbach, R. et al., The impact of 20mph zones on inequalities in road casualties in London, British Medical Journal, 2011
[3] Living Streets, The pedestrian pound: business case for better streets and places, 2015

13. Could any negative impact of the Bill on equality be minimised or avoided?

We do not consider there to be any negative impact.

14. Do you consider that the proposed Bill can be delivered sustainably i.e. without having likely future disproportionate economic, social and/or environmental impacts?

Yes

Please explain the reasons for your response

The National Institute for Health Care and Excellence (NICE) has indicated that if 20mph speed limits are introduced incorrectly, there could be significant reduction in air quality [1]. But if changes are implemented responsibly and in line with an evidence-based strategy, we think that the benefits - in terms of improved road safety and encouraging people to take up more sustainable active travel, as outlined in our response to question 7 - outweigh the cost of implementing the Bill.

In both financial and environmental terms, the cost of installing new road signs will be offset to some degree by the reduced need for 20mph repeater signs [2]; this will also result in reduced local government costs and ‘decluttering’ of residential road space.

Footnotes

[1] NICE, Air Pollution: outdoor air quality and health, 2017.
[2] Statutory instruments 2016 No.362: Traffic signs, regulations and general directions 2016, gov.uk, 2016

General

15. Do you have any other comments or suggestions on the proposal to establish a 20mph default speed limit on restricted roads?

No

Brake welcomes 20mph limits across Edinburgh

Thursday 8 January 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Plans to turn Edinburgh into Scotland’s first 20mph city have been revealed this week. Swathes of the city’s streets are set to adopt the new limit, following a public consultation last autumn, which saw significant backing for the proposals.

Brake, the road safety charity, in partnership with numerous other organisations, has long campaigned for 20, not 30mph, to be the urban default speed limit across the UK through its GO 20 campaign. Seewww.brake.org.uk/go20.

Welcoming the change, Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: “This is an enlightened move by Edinburgh Council. They recognise that 20mph limits can enable people to get around their neighbourhoods, towns and city centres more safely, sustainably and healthily. Plus it’s clear this is what the people of Edinburgh want. With anestimated 13 million people across the UK now living in areas implementing or committed to widespread 20mph limits, we think it’s time for governments in Holyrood and Westminster to adopt 20mph as the default national urban limit, to save councils money and help create safe, active, happy communities nationwide.

“As well as calling on national government to change the default urban limit to 20mph, Brake continues to encourage and support local authorities to GO 20 through implementing widespread 20 limits across cities, towns and villages. Drivers can also help protect people on foot and bike right away wherever they are, by slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops, even where the limit is still 30mph.

Brake’s advice

Brake appeals to all drivers to make a difference by slowing down to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops, even where the limit is still 30mph. This gives you much more time to react in an emergency and avoid hitting someone, with stopping distances at 20mph about half those at 30mph. It can also make your journeys smoother, with less speeding up and slowing down, so you’ll barely notice a difference in journey times, and will probably use less petrol and have less vehicle wear.

Facts

20mph limits lead to:

  • Fewer casualties: drivers have more time to react in an emergency and avoid hitting someone: stopping distances at 20mph are about half those at 30mph [1]. Children benefit especially, since they struggle to judge the speed of vehicles over 20mph [2]. Areas where 20mph limits have replaced 30mph limits have seen significant reductions in casualties [3] [4], such as 22% in Portsmouth [5], and Camden where crashes dropped by 54% in trial areas [6].
  • Healthy, active lifestyles: less fast traffic makes people feel safer, which encourages more walking and cycling. Where widespread 20mph limits have been introduced, walking and cycling has increased, including by 20% in Bristol [7]. This means better health and prevention of illnesses like heart disease and diabetes [8], and less strain on the NHS.
  • Sociable communities: 20mph limits help turn our streets from soulless thoroughfares for traffic to enjoyable social spaces where people live. Lower traffic speeds (and traffic volumes) have been shown to improve the 'sociability' of streets: people get out more and are more likely to know their neighbours [9] [10].
  • Less pollution: more people walking and cycling means less traffic and more carbon-free journeys. 20mph limits also reduce pollution by causing vehicles to travel at a more consistent speed, with less of the speeding up and slowing down that produces most vehicle emissions [11]. For the same reason, journey times are barely affected; in fact, they may be smoother and use less petrol.
  • Lower costs: every road death in the UK is estimated to cost £1.7 million [12]. Fewer casualties mean less strain on the NHS and emergency services as well as preventing families suffering emotional and financial devastation. Add the public health benefits of more walking and cycling, and introducing 20mph limits ultimately pays for itself many times over [13].

Find out more about Brake’sGO 20 campaign for safe, active, happy communities.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake onTwitter orFacebook. FollowJulie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] The Highway Code, Driving Standards Agency, 2007
[2] Reduced sensitivity to visual looming inflates the risk posed by speeding vehicles when children try to cross the road, University of London, 2011
[3 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001
[4] 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[5] Interim Evaluation of the Implementation of 20 mph Speed Limits in Portsmouth, Department for Transport, 2010
[6] Borough-wide 20mph speed limit, Camden Council, 2013,http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/transport-and-streets/traffic-management/speed-limits.en
[7] Where widespread 20mph limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20%. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[8] At least five a week – evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health – a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004
[9] The contribution of good public spaces to social integration in urban neighbourhoods, Daniel Sauter & Marco Hüttenmoser, Swiss National Science Foundation, 2006
[10] Driven to excess, Joshua Hart, University of the West of England, 2008
[11] Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999
[12] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012
[13] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of the cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation's Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in cost to health as a result of 20mph. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

Brake welcomes clarified guidance for driving examiners on speed in urban areas

Thursday 29 May 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has clarified its written guidance for driving examiners on appropriate speed in built-up areas. The move comes in response to concerns raised by Brake, the road safety charity, alongside the GO 20 coalition, over whether driving test candidates could potentially be penalised for driving at 20mph in 30mph areas, even where the lower speed is more appropriate to the road environment.

The GO 20 coalition calls for 20mph to become the default limit in cities, towns and villages, and appeals to drivers to slow down to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops, even where the limit is still 30mph, to protect people on foot and bike.

The DT1 document that contains the guidance has been clarified to make it clearer that the speed limit is the absolute maximum and does not mean it is safe to drive at that speed:

"The speed limit is a limit and not a target and there are many instances especially in narrow residential streets when candidates may need to reduce their speed considerably lower than the speed limit – this should not be considered as a fault."

This reflects advice already given to examiners by the DVSA during training. All driving test candidates must demonstrate the ability to adapt their speed to prevailing road conditions, and drive at a speed that allows them to stop safely in the distance they can see to be clear.

Welcoming the change, Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "It is excellent news that the DVSA has responded to the GO 20 coalition's concerns and clarified their guidance. There is a growing consensus that 20mph is the most appropriate top speed to protect people on foot and bike in built-up areas. It is critical that drivers learn right from the start of their driving careers that speed limits are limits, not targets, and that slowing down is one of the most important things they can do to safeguard others. This change will help give drivers the confidence to make the choice to protect people, and slow down to 20mph in communities, even in areas where the limit is still 30mph."

Find out more about Brake's GO 20 campaign for safe, active, happy communities. Tweet us @Brakecharity, #GO20.

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, a Fleet Safety Forum, practitioner services, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake’s junior campaigners say “speeding is naughty” as almost half of drivers admit breaking 20 mph limits designed to keep children safe

08/03/2016

news@brake.org.uk

Road safety charity Brake and Churchill Insurance are calling on drivers not to put young lives in danger by constantly flouting 20 mile an hour limits. A new survey has revealed 44% of drivers admit they have broken a 20 mph speed limit by at least 5 mph in the last year, a quarter of drivers (25%) admit they drive too fast in a 20 mph area around once a month, and one in five (20%) have confessed they do it on a weekly basis.  

The research also revealed just how many people think the roads near where they live are too dangerous for children because drivers are travelling too quickly. Almost three quarters of people (73%) questioned said they believe traffic is too fast for the safety of children and adults on foot or bike on some roads. One in five people (20%) said the traffic was dangerously fast on most or all of their local roads.

9 March 2016 saw hundreds of schools take part in the first of three Beep Beep! Days being held by Brake in 2016 to help children gain a basic understanding of road safety, and also to emphasise to parents and other adults their responsibilities in protecting children.

To mark this Beep Beep! Day, Brake’s youngest campaigners have starred in a short road safety video entitled “Speeding Is Naughty” to help get the message through to parents and drivers that their selfish actions can put little lives in grave danger. 

Brake Campaigner, Rosie Hutton, aged six said: “Speeding is naughty and if you drive too fast you could hurt me. Cars are made of metal and I am not. Please drive slowly near my school.”

Campaigns adviser for Brake, the road safety charity Alice Bailey said: “It was so much fun being involved with the talented youngsters who helped Brake make this year’s Beep Beep! Video, but road safety really isn’t child’s play. 40 children are killed or seriously injured on Great Britain’s roads every week. Beep Beep! Days are a great way to start talking to children about basic road safety messages and also to remind parents,carers and all other adults of their responsibilities when it comes to keeping our roads safe and protecting little lives.”

Head of Churchill Car Insurance, Steve Barrett, said:“We are very proud to be supporting Beep Beep! Day once again this year. Too many children die or are seriously injured on our roads each week. Beep Beep! Day is a great way of starting to educate young children on road safety, as well as raising awareness among drivers, including parents and grandparents, of the need to drive with extreme care when young children are about.”

REGISTER! 

Nurseries, playgroups, child-minders, infant schools and children’s centres can sign up now to run a Beep Beep! Day. Register online to receive a free electronic resource pack, or purchase a bumper hard-copy pack for £12.60 (inc VAT), including posters, stickers, certificates, activity sheets, road map and hand print poster. Go to www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday, call 01484 550061 or email:beepbeep@brake.org.uk.

Advice for parents

When your child starts to walk with you around your community, talk to them about how they must always hold your hand. If your child is likely to pull away from you, use safety reins or a wrist strap. Hold hands until your child is at least eight, or longer depending on their development.

Make sure they understand the meaning of stop, traffic, danger, look, listen, walk don't run, and other key words. Encourage your child's nursery or playgroup to teach road safety through a Beep Beep! Day. Your child's learning will be more effective if they are taught about road safety at school as well as at home.

See www.brake.org.uk/families.

Full survey results

Q.1 Within the past year, have you driven at 25mph or faster in a 20mph speed limit?

Yes, once a day or more                    3.5% 

Yes, several times a week                  9.2%

Yes, about once a week                     7.5%

Yes, about once a month                  5.1%

Yes, less than once a month           18.6%

No, never                                           56.2%

 

Q.2 Do you think traffic in your neighbourhood is too fast for the safety of children or adults on foot or bike?

Yes, traffic is too fast on most/all local roads       19.7%

Yes, traffic is too fast on some local roads           53.5%

No                                                                               26.8%

 

[ENDS]

Notes to Editors:

About Beep Beep! Day

In 2015, more than 16,000 children took part in a Beep Beep! Day at 440 schools. Brake encourages nurseries, playgroups, infant schools, children's centres and childminders to run the event on one of three dates – in 2016, these are 9 March, 13 July and 23 November – or on whatever day is best for them. Nurseries receive a free electronic pack with downloadable resources, or can buy a bumper hard-copy pack for £12.60 (inc VAT) to help them run road safety activities and promote road safety to parents and the community.

Beep Beep! Days involve activities such as creating a poster of hand prints saying 'We hold hands', experimenting with toy cars to learn the words stop and go, and singing road safety songs. Activities are designed to help children to start understanding road safety, and to emphasise to parents and other adults their responsibilities in protecting children. Sponsorship raised by children helps Brake provide support for families bereaved and injured by road crashes and run community road safety campaigns.

See www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

About Churchill

Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. UK Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Churchill and UK Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0800 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com.

Delegation of MPs meets road safety minister to lobby for 20mph limits, 14 July 2008

Cathy Keeler, Brake’s deputy chief executive, writes:

Communities are crying out for 20mph limits on dangerous roads in their communities and too many local authorities aren’t able to meet their demands. That was the message facing road safety minister Jim Fitzpatrick today, as I took five campaigning MPs to discuss the issue with him.

John Leech, MP for Manchester Withington and member of the Transport Select Committee; Jeff Ennis, MP for Barnsley East and Mexborough; Ian Gibson, MP for Norwich North; Mark Hunter, MP for Cheadle; and Bob Russell, MP for Colchester, pushed the minister for answers on why their constituents are finding it so difficult to get 20mph limits in their communities.

Some of the issues raised in discussion included enforcement of 20mph limits; local authorities’ priorities; lowering the default urban limit; and the cost of introducing road safety measures.

John Leech said that in his view there is no difference with the problems of enforcing 20mph limits as there is with enforcing 30mph limits. The minister did not agree.

The minister said the Government was keen to see more 20mph zones where it is appropriate for local authorities to introduce them, but stated there would not be any additional funding for them. Prioritisation, he said, is a matter for local authorities. However, the Department for Transport has spoken to the 20 lowest-performing local authorities [on casualty statistics] and 15 of them have now agreed to set road safety as a local priority.

Jeff Ennis asked if the minister had had any discussions about where local authorities see 20mph limits in their list of priorities, while Ian Gibson said some councils, such as his local council in Norwich, would rather sort out 20 little road-mending schemes, or a big road-widening scheme, than spend money on 20mph zones. Schools in Ian’s constituency, which are crying out for road safety measures, are just getting told they are being put ‘on the list’.

The minister said the Department for Transport was aware of a problem with inequalities, which is why it had set an extra target for tackling inequalities after its original casualty reduction targets had been set.

Mark Hunter said that, speaking as the former leader of a council, surely the way round the problem would be to ensure that authorities set borough-wide criteria. His constituency, Stockport, is a leafy middle-class suburb, which has had a lot of success in getting 20mph limits (lines and signs) put outside schools in the area. However, it is now experiencing a problem with rat-running and there is a lot of support for a reduced limit in residential areas.

Cathy Keeler said that many of the concerned communities contacting Brake were being told by local councils that dangers on the roads they were concerned about were not high priority, given the funds they had available. Others, concerned that the speed limit on a particular road was set too high, were being told that there was not a problem because vehicles were not significantly exceeding the speed limit.

John Leech expressed concern at the high cost of contractors putting in road safety schemes, with junction tables often costing in excess of £50k. The minister said that liaising with contractors was a matter for local authorities.

Bob Russell said that some additional road safety measures could be very cheap, such as painting signs on the road surface.

Cathy Keeler said that economies of scale could be made in introducing a default 20mph limit in urban areas. This was one of the reasons that Portsmouth, which is introducing a 20mph limit across the city, had decided to do treat the city as a whole, rather than prioritising individual streets for treatment.

In Brake’s view, the issue is clear-cut. Evidence shows that where 20mph limits have been introduced in urban areas, casualty rates have fallen, meaning many lives have been saved. We urge the Government to cut the urban default speed limit from 30 to 20mph, and ensure that local authorities have the resources to introduce traffic-calming measures where they are desperately needed.

Department for Transport policy meeting, 9 January 2008

Cathy Keeler, Brake’s Head of Campaigns met Road Safety Minister Jim Fitzpatrick MP on 9 January 2008.

20mph limits and safety zones

The first issue discussed was the need for a default 20mph limit in built-up areas, with 20mph safety zones outside schools and in residential areas where children are likely to be out on foot and bicycles. These are key demands of Brake’s Watch Out, There’s A Kid About! campaign.

Cathy outlined the difficulties facing many communities struggling to get lower limits and other essential measures put in place to protect kids outside their schools and homes. Brake’s mascot, Zak the zebra, is working with some of these communities to highlight dangers on local roads and lobby for lower limits. Finding funding for safety measures such as 20mph limits and traffic-calming measures is a regular problem, but a few councils have also cited Government guidelines as a barrier to reducing limits in some locations where speeds are not already low.

Cathy pointed out that the Government does not monitor implementation of its guidelines on setting speed limits and there is no information collected centrally on how many 20mph limits and safety zones are in place. Similarly, there is no central information collected on whether local authorities have implemented Department for Transport (DfT) guidance on child road safety audits. These issues were highlighted by recent Department for Transport answers to Parliamentary Questions asked by MPs Mark Hunter and John Leech in October 2007 and January 2008. This means that the Government cannot analyse to what extent its guidance is being followed by local authorities or whether it is effectively improving safety.

Jim said that DfT had identified the gap in knowledge highlighted by the Parliamentary Questions and was at the early stages of planning research on the number of 20mph speed limits and safety zones in England and Wales. He invited Brake to contribute ideas for other local authority-led road safety measures that could be analysed as part of the same research and Cathy suggested: identifying how many schools have 20mph limits outside them; how many sites in England and Wales have variable 20mph limits (as have already been implemented outside the majority of schools in Scotland); and child road safety audits.

Young drivers

Cathy urged Jim to ensure that the long-promised consultation paper on the learning to drive process included the option of introducing a system of graduated driver licensing, with a minimum learning to drive period and restrictions on driving in particularly risky situations for novice drivers, as recommended by Parliament’s Transport Select Committee.

Jim said that DfT was open to all suggestions on this issue. It was still finalising the consultation paper and he hoped it would be published in February or March.

Reporting of at-work road crashes

Cathy raised concerns about under-reporting of at-work crashes, in particular when they involve cars or vans rather than commercial vehicles. Mike Fawcett, DfT’s head of road user safety policy said DfT was aware of the concern, but did not envisage changing the form used by police before the next scheduled review date. Cathy suggested further guidance for police officers using the forms could help improve the quality of data recorded.

Driver impairment

Mobile phones - Cathy flagged up research published by the University of Utah, showing that hands-free kits slow reaction and braking times. She urged Jim to review the evidence for banning hands-free mobile phones while driving.

Drink-driving - Cathy asked when the promised consultation on drink-driving would be published and whether it would be encouraging views on the current drink-drive limit. Jim responded that there was as yet no date for publication. He did not rule out the possibility of introducing a lower drink-drive limit, but said that DfT was of the view that the biggest potential road safety gains could come from improved enforcement of the limit.

Post-2010 strategy and targets

Cathy said Brake had been pleased to hear Jim stating in speeches that even one death on the road is one too many. She encouraged DfT to adopt an overarching ‘vision’ along these lines, similar to the Vision Zero approach adopted in Sweden. Jim said that DfT would be seeking the views of Brake and other stakeholders on developing a post-2010 road safety strategy and casualty reduction targets during 2008.

Driver advice: speed

slow2

Drivers can Pledge to – stay under limits, slow down to 20mph around schools, homes and shops to protect others, slow right down for bends, brows and bad weather, and avoid overtaking.

Everyone can Pledge to – speak out for slowing down and help drivers understand that the slower they drive, the more chance they have of avoiding a crash and saving a life.

Driving slowly is one of the most important things drivers can do to protect themselves and others. That means staying well within limits, slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops, slowing right down for bends, brows and bad weather, and avoiding overtaking.

It’s essential to safe and considerate driving because slowing down gives you much more time to react to people and hazards around you, and avoid hitting someone or something. Slowing down helps make our roads and communities safer, greener, nicer places, and can mean the difference between life and death in an emergency.

Limits are limits, not targets

Stay well under limits, rather than hovering around them. Look out for signs, including temporary limits, and obey them, regularly glancing at your speedo. Know which limits are usually in place on different roads (see the Highway Code) and if unsure, err on the side of caution and slow down. It will help you stay safe and avoid fines and penalty points.

Keep at least a two-second gap (four in the wet) behind the vehicle in front on any road, but especially at higher speeds – it’s your braking space in a crisis.

GO 20 in towns and villages

Sometimes the speed limit is too fast for safety. The UK’s default limit in built-up areas is 30mph, although more and more local authorities are implementing 20 limits across towns, cities and villages to protect people on foot and bike.

GO20-20mphSign

Drivers can make a big difference now by committing to GO 20 in all communities: slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops, even where the limit is still 30mph. You’ll help to make streets and communities safer, greener, more pleasant places.

At 20mph, your stopping distance is about half that at 30mph, so GOing 20 makes a big difference to safety, but it won’t be a big inconvenience. Your journeys should be smoother and use less petrol, and your journey times are unlikely to be significantly longer. Driving at 20mph in communities gives you time to react in an emergency, such as if a child runs out.

Go slow on rural roads

Rural roads are often bendy and narrow with poor visibility and hidden junctions. Even if you know the road well, you never know what’s round the corner. The majority of driver and passenger deaths happen on rural roads, often due to drivers taking bends too fast, overtaking, or not being able to react to unexpected hazards.

That’s why slowing down on rural roads is crucial. The derestricted limit (60mph for cars and vans) is generally far too fast for safety – so stay well beneath this and slow right down for bends, brows, dips and junctions, and in bad weather. You should be able to come to a stop within the space you can see.

Slowing down on rural roads also helps people to enjoy the countryside, and people in rural communities to get about, by being able to cycle, walk and horse-ride without being endangered. Rural roads are shared – not drivers’ private race tracks.

Go slow in bad weather

Slowing down – or avoiding driving at all if you can – is crucial to staying safe in bad weather. Driving in wet or icy conditions significantly increases your stopping distances, while fog and mist make it far harder to react to hazards. Read our ABC of bad weather driving.

Don’t overtake

Overtaking on single carriageways is incredibly risky and should be avoided. It is impossible to accurately judge the speed of approaching traffic, or the length of empty road in front of you, and when overtaking this can be fatal. The gap between you and oncoming traffic disappears surprisingly fast. If you and an oncoming vehicle are both driving at 60mph, the gap between you is closing at 120mph, or 60 metres a second. So a small error of judgement can easily result in multiple deaths.

That’s why it isn’t worth the risk. Often overtaking makes little difference to your arrival time, but could mean you and someone else never arriving at all. So never overtake on single carriageways unless absolutely essential, such as because you need to pass a stationary or extremely slow moving vehicle. Only then do so if certain there’s enough space to get past without speeding and with no risk of someone coming the other way. Otherwise just hang back and relax.

GO20-RoadMarkingSlow-Mono-small

Ditch the excuses

Some drivers use all sorts of excuses for speeding: they don’t notice their speed creeping up, they feel pressured by other drivers, they’re in a rush, or think they can handle it because of their fast reaction times and good brakes. The fact is, slowing down is essential to safe driving, no matter who you are or what you’re driving. Studies have proven the link between speed and safety: reducing average speeds leads to fewer crashes and casualties, and if you speed, you’re far more likely to crash.

The laws of physics mean that going even a bit faster makes a big difference to your stopping distance and therefore your ability to react and stop. For example, increasing your speed by 25%, from 40mph to 50mph, increases your stopping distance by 47%, from 36m to 53m. Learn more about stopping distances.

In short, slowing down is vital to safety, especially in protecting our most vulnerable road users like children, and enabling people to walk and cycle without fearing for their lives. And it’s not a big ask. All drivers should be able to keep an eye on their speed, and protecting people should always be the priority over getting there a few minutes faster.

  • Read our factsheets on speed for more information
  • Back our GO 20campaign for lower speed limits in towns, cities and villages
  • How much do you know about stopping distances?Use Brake's stopping distance tool
  • Pledgeto always drive below the limit and slow down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops 
aaronthumb Aaron was just 12 years old when he was knocked down and killed by a speeding car.
emmathumb

Emma was tragically killed by a speeding car that crashed into oncoming traffic.

Visit Brake's Youtube channel for more videos.


 

Page updated June 2016

East England schools join national march for drivers to slow down to save kids’ lives

15 June 2011
Brake, the road safety charity, PO Box 548, Huddersfield, HD1 2XZ
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

4,576 children from schools in the East of England will be marching from their school gates at 10am on Wednesday 15 June to call for safer roads for children and make an attempt on the world record for the largest 'walking bus'. They will be appealing to local drivers to slow down to 20mph or below in built-up areas to protect children on foot.

 

The children are joining tens of thousands more across the UK taking part in the Giant Walking Bus, co-ordinated by road safety charity Brake and sponsored by leading fuel brand Jet. The event aims to raise awareness of the appalling number of children killed and hurt on roads, help schools to teach children about road safety, and appeal to drivers to slow down in communities. A list of schools in the region who have invited media to attend is available from Brake (contact below).

Shockingly, 657 children are hurt or killed each year while on foot on East of England roads.[1]

As well as calling on drivers to help protect children by driving at 20mph or below in communities, Brake is calling for widespread 20mph limits in built-up areas. 20mph limits are shown to deliver significant community benefits, including reduced casualties, particularly among children.[2] Many local authorities are implementing 20mph limits as the norm in built-up areas; Brake is appealing to more to follow suit, creating a safer environment for children to walk and cycle.

A survey of nearly 1,200 parents across the UK by Brake, released today, found widespread concern about the threat of fast traffic. Nearly six in 10 (57%) said they need a 20mph limit outside their home while nearly half (49%) said the road where they live is plagued by speeding drivers.

The Giant Walking Bus is expected to involve more than 125,000 children from nearly 600 schools around the UK. They aim to break the current record of 119,697 children taking part in a walking bus, and raise £35,000 for Brake's work, including its helpline for bereaved and injured families.

At the same time, Jet is backing the campaign by aiming to get thousands of drivers to make a pledge to drive at 20mph or below in built up areas, which they can sign up to at participating Jet fuel stations around the country.

Julie Townsend, Brake's campaigns director, says: "Brake supports families whose children have been killed or maimed on roads – so we know the terrible devastation these tragedies cause. Yet many could be prevented by drivers taking the simple step of slowing down in communities. You never know when a child might make a mistake and run out; your slower driving could save their life. At 20mph or lower, you stand a good chance of stopping in time if a child runs out three car lengths ahead. At 30mph or more, you would barely slow down before hitting them, potentially with catastrophic results. Please back our campaign for safer roads for children by pledging to drive at 20mph or below in communities."

Wendy Logan, whose son Gordon was knocked down and killed, aged 10, by a speeding driver says: "Children are so precious and yet so many children are killed or horrendously injured in the UK by dangerous driving. I support this event to raise awareness of the importance of driving slowly in communities and to raise funds for such an important charity that providing vital support to road crash victims."

Tony Conway, Marketing Manager at Jet, comments: "Jet is delighted to be sponsoring Brake's Giant Walking Bus event this year. As a company that puts safety at the heart of its operations and runs a number of educational safety initiatives, this sponsorship is very much in line with Jet's aim of supporting the local community. Our link with Brake goes back a number of years and we continue to be impressed with the level of enthusiasm and commitment shown by the Brake team, both for the annual event and the many other ongoing projects the charity operates."

For interviews with Brake call Katie Shephard on 01484 559909, or email brake@brake.org.uk.

Facts about children's road safety and 20mph limits:

  • Traffic is the biggest 'accidental' killer of children in the UK.[3]
  • In 2009, 54 under-18s were killed and 1,930 more were seriously injured while on foot in the UK.[4]
  • The UK's child pedestrian death rate per population is worse than 10 other EU countries, and eight times higher than Sweden's.[5]
  • Children in the lowest socio-economic group are more than four times more likely to be killed as pedestrians than their counterparts in the highest socio-economic group. A report published last year mapped out the parts of the UK where children are most at risk. [6]
  • Parents are more and more likely to take their child to school by car than let them walk or cycle. The 'school run' now accounts for 21% of car trips in urban areas at peak times.[7]
  • A walking bus is a healthy and environmentally-friendly way for children to get to school, with adult supervision to ensure children can negotiate dangerous roads safely. Many schools have set one up as part of their School Travel Plan.
  • A range of evidence is available on the effectiveness of 20mph limits in improving safety, especially for children. For example, see research on the impact of 20mph zones in London and Hull, an initial evaluation of city-wide 20mph limits in Portsmouth, and research into 30km/h limits (about 19mph) in the Netherlands.
  • For a factsheet explaining why 20mph is the most appropriate limit in built-up areas, and beneficial for children's safety, see www.brake.org.uk/speed-in-towns-and-villages.
  • For information on areas around the UK implementing widespread 20mph limits, and the benefits of this, see www.20splentyforus.org.uk.

[1] Statistics are given for children aged under 18 from Road Casualties Great Britain 2009, Department for Transport, 2010, and Annual Statistical Report 2009 No. 6 Reported Injury Road Traffic Collisions & Casualties, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2010

[2] For example, see research on the impact of 20mph zones in London and Hull, an initial evaluation of city-wide 20mph limits in Portsmouth, and research into 30km/h limits (about 19mph) in the Netherlands.

[3] Deaths by age, sex and selected underlying cause, 2008 registrations: England and Wales, Office for National Statistics, 2009 and Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, 2008 registrations, Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, 2009 and Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, Vital Events Reference Tables 2008, General Register Office for Scotland, 2010

[4] Road Casualties Great Britain 2009, Department for Transport, 2010, and Annual Statistical Report 2009 No. 6 Reported Injury Road Traffic Collisions & Casualties, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2010

[5] Road Casualties 2009, Department for Transport, 2010

[6] A study into resident risk of children on roads in Great Britain 2004-08, Road Safety Analysis, 2010, see http://www.roadsafetyanalysis.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Child-Casualty-Report-2010.pdf

[7] National Travel Survey 2009, Office for National Statistics, 2010

Educators urged to join the GO 20 campaign for a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling

As survey shows 7 in 10 kids are prevented from walking and cycling by traffic danger


19 November 2012

Brake, the road safety charity
t: 01484 559909 e: news@brake.org.uk  

Schools are being urged to get involved with a national campaign launched today (19 November) appealing to drivers and authorities to GO 20, to bring about a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling for everyone. Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on all educators to support the campaign as a survey released today shows that more than half of children worry about being hurt by traffic when out and about.

Thousands of schools across the UK are appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph or below in communities, and calling for 20mph limits across built up areas, so children, families and adults can walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment, and as a cheap and sustainable travel choice, without being endangered.

Brake is encouraging schools to teach children and teenagers about the benefits of 20mph limits and staying safe when walking, cycling and in cars, and also to engage pupils in raising awareness among local drivers about the need to slow down to protect children. Educators can access guidance on this at www.roadsafetyweek.org.

Schools can also report their concerns about pupils' safety on local streets by calling Brake's Zak the Zebra hotline on 08000 68 7780 to receive a campaign action pack.

As the GO 20 campaign is launched at the start of Road Safety Week through street parties and demonstrations across the UK (see below), a survey of more than 8,000 children [1] age 7-11 by Brake and partners Brain Injury Group and Specsavers reveals how the majority of children are being prevented from leading active, healthy lifestyles by traffic danger:

  • Seven in 10 (70%) say they would be able to walk and cycle more if roads in their neighbourhood were less dangerous
  • More than three-quarters (77%) say drivers need to slow down around their home and school
  • Four in 10 (43%) say they have been hit or nearly hit while walking or cycling, and more than half (54%) worry about being hurt by traffic when out and about

A further survey of 280 [2] teachers across the UK reveals that the vast majority believe more should be done to keep children safe on the roads:

  • Nine in 10 (94%) believe roads around their schools and routes connecting their schools with local homes should be made safer for children walking and cycling.
  • Four in five believe roads around their school and routes connecting their schools with local homes would benefit from 20mph limits.

Brake is highlighting that slower speeds in towns, cities and villages can help deliver a post-2012 legacy of active communities, and prevent devastating casualties among pedestrians and cyclists, which increased in 2011 (see below). Many local authorities are recognising the benefits by implementing town and city-wide 20 limits. Brake is calling for: more authorities to follow suit; the government to work towards 20mph being the norm in communities; and drivers to pledge to GO 20in built up areas, even where 30 limits remain.

Why GO 20:

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have much more time to react, to help them stop in time if they need to, like if a child runs out. Studies show that when 20 limits replace 30, it means fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [3].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [4].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution: GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [5]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [6]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [7]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [8]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

Read more about the case for GO 20.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive of Brake, says: "Everyone should be able to walk and cycle in their community without fear or threat: it's a basic right, and GO 20 is about defending that. The 2012 Games helped us all realise the importance of being able to live active lifestyles. Critical to this is making our streets and communities safe places we can use and enjoy. Anyone who drives can help bring this about: pledge to GO 20 in communities, even where the limit's still 30: you'll be doing something good for people around you, and you'll hardly notice the difference to your journey. We're also calling on government and authorities everywhere to recognise the need for 20mph, and the huge demand for safe walking and cycling, and GO 20."

Danny Crates, Paralympics presenter, gold medal winner and GO 20 ambassador, says: "I am passionate about children being able to live healthy, happy, active lives: it's something all kids should be able to do, not just the privileged few. Bringing about the 2012 legacy we all want to see isn't only about providing sports facilities. It's also about making our towns, cities and villages places where kids and adults can get out and about – running, walking, cycling, visiting friends, going to the park – without being put in danger, or even being hurt or killed. That's why I'm behind GO 20, and appealing to everyone who's been inspired by the Games to get behind this important campaign."

Drivers and non-drivers can pledge their support for safer walking and cycling at go20.org.

More survey results

8,061 children age 7-11 gave their views through hands-up surveys in schools across the UK. As well as the results above:

  • 72% said they would like to walk and cycle more than they do at present
  • 75% would like more traffic-free cycle paths in their area, while 61% would like more footpaths, pavements and crossings, which they could use to get to school, the park, shops or to see friends
  • 38% said they are not allowed to walk unaccompanied and 47% said they are not allowed to cycle unaccompanied.

Compare results from different UK regions on this restricted-access web page.

Pedestrian and cyclist casualties

Every day in the UK, 19 adults and seven children are mowed down and killed or seriously hurt when on foot or bike.

In 2011 pedestrian deaths and serious injuries went up significantly, and for the first time in 17 years. Pedestrian deaths increased by 12%, while serious injuries increased by 5%. 466 people were killed on foot in 2011 and 5,654 were seriously injured. Of these victims, 31% (1,901) were children: 50 child pedestrians were killed in 2011 and 1,851 suffered serious injuries.

While cyclist deaths decreased by 2% in 2011, serious injuries increased by 16%. 109 cyclists were killed in 2011 and 3,132 suffered serious injuries. Of these victims, 16% (511) were children: 10 child cyclists were killed and 501 suffered serious injuries. [9]

Case studies

Aaron Britt, 16, from Mansfield, was knocked down and killed by a speeding driver outside his college in October 2011. Aaron suffered severe head injuries and died the next day. Read more. Sue Britt, Aaron's mum, said: "Aaron was our only son and we feel empty without him. He was an exceptional young lad; he knew exactly what he wanted to do with his life and had set about making it happen. I urge drivers to slow down to 20mph or less where people are so you have time to stop if someone steps out. Simply making a commitment to slow down will mean you're helping to make roads safer, and it could prevent more people losing their lives needlessly, and other families going through the pain and heartache we have. Aaron was kind and thoughtful and did not deserve to die for making a mistake."

Notes for editors

GO 20 is a partnership campaign being launched by Brake at the start of Road Safety Week 2012 (19-25 November). Find out more at www.go20.org.

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2012 takes place 19-25 November, with support from headline sponsors Brain Injury Group and Specsavers, plus regional sponsors Woop young driver insurance, Bubblebum UK Ltd, Fleet Support Group and Leigh Day & Co Solicitors.

Road crashes are not accidents; the use of the term 'accident' undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by drivers taking risks on roads.

End notes

[1] 8,061 children gave their views through 'hands-up' surveys in schools across the UK, Brake, 2012

[2] 280 teachers gave their opinions through written surveys in schools across the UK, Brake 2012.

[3] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[4] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[5] Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999

[6] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[7] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[8] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation's Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012. Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers' speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy. Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[9] These figures are from Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2011, and Police recorded injury road traffic collisions and casualties Northern Ireland annual report 2011, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2012. Figures for children were requested from the Department for Transport and Police Service for Northern Ireland and are for children aged 0 – 17.

 

Five Reasons To Drive More Slowly

Speeding is the biggest cause of road traffic collisions and we all know that exceeding the limit by even a few mph can have a catastrophic impact in a collision. What is less discussed is the impact of speeding on your driving behaviour in general – what happens to you and your car when you drive slowly? What are the benefits?

Octo Telematics, the number one global provider of telematics for the auto insurance industry, supports Road Safety Week and the pledges Brake has proposed on slow driving:

Drivers – I'll stay under limits, and slow down to 20mph around schools, homes and shops to protect others. I'll slow right down for bends, brows and bad weather, and avoid overtaking.

Everyone– I'll speak out for slowing down and help drivers understand that the slower they drive, the more chance they have of avoiding a crash and saving a life.

Here are five good reasons to drive slowly, for yourself and for all those around you:

  1. Safety – Driving more slowly is crucial to road safety. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds is estimated to lead to a 5% fall in crash rates. Police at crash scenes record breaking the speed limit or travelling too fast for conditions as a contributory factor in more than one in four (27%) fatal crashes in the UK.
  2. Wear and tear - Speed has a huge impact on wear and tear from the moment you start the car to the moment you put on the hand brake. It’s much kinder to your engine to start the car and move away slowly than to start the engine and wait for it to warm up before roaring away. Harsh braking and cornering at speed also take a toll on your tyres.
  3. Fuel costs - Once you’re on the road, slower driving means lower fuel costs – driving faster tends to burn more fuel and is a less efficient way to drive. It has a big impact on stopping and starting on your journey too – rapid acceleration and harsh braking also affect your fuel emissions.
  4. Awareness – Slower driving makes you more aware of and responsive to your environment, making you more likely to react safely to potential hazards. Take every opportunity to look, see and act on what's happening well ahead and around you. This pays off not only in terms of collision prevention, but also a more efficient and relaxing drive.
  5. Stress – Driving more slowly and carefully means less stress for you and for other road users around you. The desire to do get everywhere at top speed is a big source of stress – accept that you can’t control traffic flow.Simply observe your situation and then make your move... and save yourself and others from road rage.

Octo’s free smartphone app Octo U (iPhone and Android) collects, analyses and stores telematics data on your driving behaviour, giving you tips on how to improve and a score to motivate you. It detects, reconstructs and analyses all significant events that occur during a trip, such as harsh braking, rapid acceleration, speeding and how curves are negotiated. You can compare your score with friends and compete to be the best driver, as well as submit it to a panel of insurers to see if you could qualify for a discount.

Gisela Stuart, MP for Birmingham, Edgbaston, September 2008

sept08Gisela Stuart MP launched a Twenty’s Plenty campaign this month, which aims to tackle speeding traffic in the streets around schools in Bartley Green, Edgbaston, Harborne and Quinton.

After talking to parents, pupils and teachers in her constituency, Gisela launched the campaign to urge Birmingham City Council to introduce a mandatory 20mph speed limit around schools and to appoint more crossing wardens so that children have a safe spot to cross the road on their way to and from school.

With the cooperation of headteachers, Gisela has issued surveys to parents asking whether they would support the introduction of a zone in the area around their child’s school and what other road safety measures they would like to see.

Gisela says: “This is an urban community with extremely busy roads and making the school run safer for children is a major priority. I know that many constituents are keen to see more crossing wardens, especially on some of our busier roads. We will be using the findings of the survey to help put the case for action to the City Council”.

Brake will keep you up-to-date with the progress of this campaign which links in with Brake’s Watch Out, There’s a Kid About! campaign.

Earlier this year, Gisela also supported a resident-led campaign to improve road safety on Monument Road, a local traffic blackspot. The current crossing, located close to the junction with Plough and Harrow Road, was deemed unsafe by many residents and a cause of traffic congestion along this extremely busy road.

Gisela lobbied the Council’s Highways Department for action and the Council has now agreed to upgrade the zebra crossing on Monument Road, Edgbaston, into a pelican crossing. Work on the road will begin at the end of this year.

Gisela says: “Pelican crossings are far safer and it will enable residents and shoppers to cross this busy road far more easily.”

If you know of a dangerous road in your area, call Brake’s Zak the zebra hotline on 08000 68 77 80 or report the road online, and Brake could help you campaign for road safety improvements.

GO 20 campaign calls for 2012 legacy of safe walking, running and cycling

As survey reveals 9 in 10 runners worry for their safety

19 November 2012

Brake, the road safety charity
T: 01484 559909 E: news@brake.org.uk 

A campaign launched today (19 Nov) at the start of Road Safety Week is appealing to drivers and authorities everywhere toGO 20, to bring about a 2012 legacy of safe walking, cycling and running for everyone. Brake, the road safety charity, is appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph or below in communities, and calling for widespread 20mph limits in built up areas, so children and adults can run, walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment, without their lives being endangered.

The campaign is being backed by Paralympic gold-medal winning runner and TV presenter Danny Crates and a young woman who suffered horrendous injuries when she was knocked down while running (see below for quotes).

As theGO 20 campaign is launched through street parties and demonstrations across the UK, a survey of runners [1] by Brake reveals how they are being put at risk by fast traffic:

  • More than nine in 10 (94%) say they worry for their safety when out running because of fast traffic
  • Half (50%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle when running
  • More than nine in 10 (92%) say improvements are needed in their area to make roads safer for people on foot and bicycle;
  • More than eight in 10 (85%) say traffic is too fast on at least some roads in their area. One in four (25%) say it's too fast on all their local roads.

A survey of 8,000 children by Brake and partners Brain Injury Group and Specsavers also reveals that seven in 10 children (70%) are being prevented from getting out and about on foot and bike because of traffic danger (more results below).

Brake is highlighting that slower traffic speeds can help deliver a post-2012 legacy of active communities, and prevent devastating casualties among people on foot and bicycle, which increased in 2011 (see below). Many local authorities are recognising the benefits by implementing town and city-wide 20mph limits. Brake is calling for: more authorities to follow suit; the government to work towards 20mph being the norm in communities; and drivers to pledge to GO 20 in built up areas, even where 30 limits remain.

More than 6,000 organisations, schools and community groups around the UK are taking part in Road Safety Week to raise awareness so children, families and adults can walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment, and as a cheap and sustainable travel choice, without their lives being endangered.

Why GO 20:

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have much more time to react, to help them stop in time if they need to, like if a child runs out. Studies show that when 20 limits replace 30, it means fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists[2].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling[3].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution:GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [4]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [5]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services[6]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [7]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike. 

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive at Brake, says: “Everyone should be able to run, walk and cycle in their community without fear or threat: it’s a basic right, and GO 20 is about defending that. The 2012 Games helped us all realise the importance of being able to live active lifestyles. Critical to this is making our streets and communities safe places we can use and enjoy. Anyone who drives can help bring this about: pledge to GO 20 in communities, even where the limit’s still 30: you’ll be helping to protect others on foot and bike, and you’ll hardly notice the difference to your journey. We’re also calling on government and more local authorities to recognise the need for 20mph, and the huge demand for safe walking and cycling, and GO 20. Runners who care about their own and others’ safety on roads can back the campaign at go20.org.”

Danny Crates, Paralympics presenter, gold medal winner and GO 20 ambassador, says: “I am passionate about children being able to live healthy, happy, active lives: it’s something all kids should be able to do, not just the privileged few. Bringing about the 2012 legacy we all want to see isn’t only about providing sports facilities. It’s also about making our towns, cities and villages places where kids and adults can get out and about – running, walking, cycling, visiting friends, going to the park – without being put in danger, or even being hurt or killed. That’s why I’m behind GO 20, and appealing to everyone who’s been inspired by the Games to get behind this important campaign.”

Drivers and non-drivers can pledge their support for safer walking and cycling at go20.org.

Pedestrian and cyclist casualties

Every day in the UK, 19 adults and seven children are mowed down and killed or seriously hurt when on foot or bike. In 2011 across the UK pedestrian and cyclist deaths and serious injuries went up significantly, and for the first time in 17 years:

  • 466 people were killed on foot in 2011, up 12% from the previous year, and 5,654 were seriously injured, up 5%. Of these victims, 31% (1,901) were children: 50 child pedestrians were killed in 2011 and 1,851 suffered serious injuries.
  • 109 cyclists were killed, down 2% from the previous year, and 3,132 suffered serious injuries, up 16%. Of these victims, 16% (511) were children: 10 child cyclists were killed and 501 suffered serious injuries.[8]

Case study

Fenella Shelton from Southampton was knocked down and seriously injured in 2007, age 21 at the time. She was going for a run, crossing at a pelican crossing on the Avenue in Southampton, a 30mph road, when a car crashed into her, leaving her with serious long term injuries, requiring years of rehabilitation and nine operations.

Fenella is supporting the GO 20 campaign to encourage drivers to think about the awful consequences of driving too fast in communities. Read more.

Fenella says: “I’m so angry I lost three years of my life to recovering from a crash because a driver just didn’t think about his speed. People need to be more aware when they’re driving, but too many don’t think about the consequences. I’m lucky to be alive and I’m lucky I still have my leg, but others aren’t so lucky, and I wouldn’t wish my injuries on anyone. I’m supporting Road Safety Week and the GO 20 campaign to encourage drivers to think about the consequences of speeding, and commit to slowing down to 20 in towns to keep everyone safe. I think we all should be able to walk, cycle and run in our neighbourhoods without having to risk terrible injuries.”

Results from Brake’s survey of children

A survey of more than 8,000 children [9] age 7-11 by Brake and partners Brain Injury Group and Specsavers reveals how the majority of children are being prevented from leading active, healthy lifestyles by traffic danger:

  • Seven in 10 (70%) say they would be able to walk and cycle more if roads in their neighbourhood were less dangerous
  • More than three-quarters (77%) say drivers need to slow down around their home and school
  • Four in 10 (43%) say they have been hit or nearly hit while walking or cycling, and more than half (54%) worry about being hurt by traffic when out and about

Notes for editors

GO 20 is a partnership campaign being launched by Brake at the start of Road Safety Week 2012 (19-25 November). Find out more at www.go20.org.

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such asRoad Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake’s support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2012 takes place 19-25 November, with support from headline sponsors Brain Injury Group and Specsavers, plus regional sponsors Woop young driver insurance, Bubblebum UK Ltd, Fleet Support Group and Leigh Day & Co Solicitors.

The Brain Injury Group is the UK’s first national network of dedicated brain and head injury lawyers and expert specialists that provides a complete package of support for brain injured people and their families.  If you have been affected by brain injury, you can find a local, specialist, skilled brain injury lawyer and other associated support services to help you at www.braininjurygroup.co.uk

Good eyesight is imperative to road safety, which is why Specsavers has made a longstanding commitment to promoting the importance of clear vision behind the wheel, working alongside the national road safety charity Brake. The Specsavers Drive Safe road show tours events and town centres across the country with its specially designed trailer. Visitors to the trailer are invited to receive free vision and hearing screening, with experts on hand to answer any questions.


Road crashes are not accidents; the use of the term ‘accident’ undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by drivers taking risks on roads.

End notes

[1] 213 runners gave their views through an anonymous online  survey, promoted by Brake and Runner’s World, Brake, 2012

[2] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001;  20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[3] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[4] Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999

[5] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[6] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[7] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation’s Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012.  Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy.  Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[8] These figures are from Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2011, and Police recorded injury road traffic collisions and casualties Northern Ireland annual report 2011, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2012. Figures for children were requested from the Department for Transport and Police Service for Northern Ireland and are for children aged 0 – 17.

[9] 8,061 children gave their views through ‘hands-up’ surveys in schools across the UK, Brake, 2012

GO 20 campaign calls for a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling

Fleets urged to raise awareness among at-work drivers during Road Safety Week

19 November 2012

Brake, the road safety charity
19 november 2012 

A national campaign launched today (19 November) is appealing to drivers to GO 20, to bring about a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling for everyone. Brake, the road safety charity is appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops, and calling for 20mph limits in built-up areas, so children and adults can walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment, and for cheap and sustainable travel, without being endangered.

Fleet operators and suppliers nationwide are helping to promote the life saving slow down message by getting involved in Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), coordinated by Brake, and mobilising staff and communities in awareness-raising activities.

Thousands of organisations, schools and community groups around the UK are taking part in the Week to get the message across about how we can make roads safer and prevent needless tragedies.

Brake is encouraging companies, particularly fleet operators, to take advantage of the event to promote safe driving to staff and show their commitment to road safety in the wider community. Companies can still register on the Road Safety Week website to receive a pack of free electronic resources, including a guidance sheet by Brake's Fleet Safety Forum on managing driver speed.

As the GO 20 campaign is launched in Road Safety Week through street parties and events across the UK (see below), a survey of more than 8,000 children [1] age 7-11 by Brake, Brain Injury Group and Specsavers reveals how children are affected by danger from fast traffic:

  • Seven in 10 (70%) say they would be able to walk and cycle more if roads in their neighbourhood were less dangerous
  • More than three-quarters (77%) say drivers need to slow down around their home and school
  • Four in 10 (43%) say they have been hit or nearly hit while walking or cycling, and more than half (54%) worry about being hurt by traffic when out and about.

The GO 20 campaign is highlighting that slower speeds in towns, cities and villages can help deliver a post-2012 legacy of active communities, and prevent devastating pedestrian and cyclist casualties, which increased in 2011 (see below). Many authorities are already recognising the benefits of 20mph by implementing town and city-wide 20 limits. GO 20 calls for: more authorities to do this; the government to work towards 20mph being the norm in communities; and drivers to pledge to GO 20 around homes, schools and shops, even where 30 limits remain.

Why GO 20:

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have much more time to react, to help them stop in time if they need to, like if a child runs out. Studies show that when 20 limits replace 30, it means fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [2].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [3].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution: GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [4]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [5]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [6]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [7]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

Read more about the case for GO 20 here.

Companies getting involved in Road Safety Week:

Below are some examples of how fleets and fleet suppliers are getting involved in Road Safety Week.

Balfour Beatty Fleet Services are visiting three high schools in the Derby area, West Park School, Derby College and Friesland School to deliver interactive presentations which will encourage Year 11 and 12 students to drive safely.

Cardinus Risk Management are holding a cine racing event with a buffet, disco, charity auction and raffle, with all proceeds being donated to Brake to support their work preventing road crashes and supporting the victims.

Colas Limited are engaging their staff on the importance of slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops by running a Bright Day on 23rd November 2012 at their head office in Crawley and across the UK, where everyone will wear fluorescent clothing to work. This is particularly important message during the winter months as darker nights and worsening weather conditions reduce visibility and make it harder to see children and pedestrians.

Eddie Stobart employees will be working with pupils at West Haddon Primary School in Northamptonshire to deliver road safety messages to children around the importance of Be Bright Be Seen and the Green Cross Code.

Many of the organisations taking part are Brake partners and subscribers to Brake's Fleet Safety Forum, which provides advice, information and resources based around a programme of events for fleet professionals, sharing and promoting best practice and latest research. 2013 topics include Using in-vehicle technology to improve safety, Creating sustainable travel plans, and Blind spots & manoeuvring: preventing crashes with pedestrians and cyclists. Fleet operators can find out how they can benefit from this essential service at www.fleetsafetyforum.org.

A free copy of the Forum's guidance report for fleet managers on Managing driver speed is included in the e-action pack available by registering at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive of Brake, says: "GO 20 is all about enabling people to walk and cycle without fear or threat. If we are to bring about a 2012 legacy of more active communities, we need to make our streets and communities safer places. Fleet operators can play an essential role in bringing this about, by ensuring their drivers always put protecting people first, and understand the vital importance of slowing down. Our main message in Road Safety Week is appealing to drivers to stay well within limits, and slow down to 20 around homes, schools and shops. It makes roads safer for walking and cycling, and makes little difference to journey times. It's great so many fleet operators are getting involved and helping to communicate this and other life-saving messages this year. We urge other employers to register on the Road Safety Week website to get our free guidance on managing driver speed."

Anyone can pledge their support for GO 20 at go20.org.

Campaign launch events

GO 20 is being launched at a walking and cycling street party in Islington, London's first 20mph borough:
AT: 10.30am, Monday 19 November 2012
WHERE: Sable Street, Islington N1 2AF (at the back of William Tyndale Primary School)
FILMING/PHOTOS: children from William Tyndale Primary School will be hearing from Paralympian Danny Crates how great it is to be healthy and active, taking part in a safe cycling demo with Islington Council, carrying out speed checks with Met Police, and celebrating 20mph with their own banners and placards
INTERVIEWS: Brake deputy CEO Julie Townsend; Paralympian Danny Crates; bereaved parents Sue and Dave Britt; injured campaigner Tom Kearney; Chief Inspector Ian Vincent, Metropolitan Police; Cllr James Murray, Islington Council's executive member for housing and development; vox pops with kids

Other events are happening across the UK, in partnership with local authorities, emergency services and schools. Find out more from news@brake.org.uk / 01484 559909.

Pedestrian and cyclist casualties

Every day in the UK, 19 adults and seven children are mowed down and killed or seriously hurt when on foot or bike.

In 2011 pedestrian deaths and serious injuries went up significantly, and for the first time in 17 years. Pedestrian deaths increased by 12%, while serious injuries increased by 5%. 466 people were killed on foot in 2011 and 5,654 were seriously injured. Of these victims, 31% (1,901) were children: 50 child pedestrians were killed in 2011 and 1,851 suffered serious injuries.

While cyclist deaths decreased by 2% in 2011, serious injuries increased by 16%. 109 cyclists were killed in 2011 and 3,132 suffered serious injuries. Of these victims, 16% (511) were children: 10 child cyclists were killed and 501 suffered serious injuries. [8]

More survey results

8,061 children age 7-11 gave their views through hands-up surveys in schools across the UK. As well as the results above:

  • 72% said they would like to walk and cycle more than they do at present
  • 75% would like more traffic-free cycle paths in their area, while 61% would like more footpaths, pavements and crossings, which they could use to get to school, the park, shops or to see friends
  • 38% said they are not allowed to walk unaccompanied and 47% said they are not allowed to cycle unaccompanied.

Compare results from different UK regions on this restricted-access web page.

Case studies

Aaron Britt, 16, from Mansfield, was knocked down and killed by a speeding driver outside his college on 3 October 2011. Aaron suffered severe head injuries and died the following day. His mum Sue Britt is supporting Road Safety Week and the GO 20 campaign. Read more.

Sue Britt says: "Aaron was our only son and we feel empty without him. He was an exceptional young lad; he knew exactly what he wanted to do with his life and had set about making it happen. I urge drivers to slow down to 20mph or less where people are so you have time to stop if someone steps out. Simply making a commitment to slow down will mean you're helping to make roads safer, and it could prevent more people losing their lives needlessly, and other families going through the pain and heartache we have. Aaron was kind and thoughtful and did not deserve to die for making a mistake."

Tom Kearney, 47, of Hampstead, was struck by a bus as he was about to cross Oxford Street at a pedestrian crossing on the busiest shopping day of the year. He suffered severe injuries to his brain and lungs, and was in a deep near-death coma for two weeks. It took Tom two years to recover. Read more.

Tom said: "It took me about two years to rebuild my life because of being hit by a bus. I'm lucky to still be here at all; other people are not so lucky. Drivers can make a big difference in helping to prevent injuries, deaths and suffering by being more aware about the harm they can cause, and taking responsibility for the speed of their vehicles. Drivers should slow right down on shopping streets, in residential neighbourhoods and around schools. Vehicles have the right to be on roads, but so do pedestrians and other non-vehicle road users. If you are behind the wheel of a vehicle, you also have the responsibility to drive with lives outside your vehicle in mind."

Sponsor quotes

Dame Mary Perkins, founder of Specsavers, says: "We are proud to be backing Road Safety Week and joining Brake in calling for action to protect people on foot and bicycle and make our roads safer for everyone. At Specsavers we think protecting children, families and people of all ages when they walk and cycle is absolutely vital. Allowing more people to walk or cycle safely is good for health, the economy and the environment. Everyone can play a part in making this happen, but drivers in particular can take some simple steps, like committing to slowing down to 20mph where people live, and making sure they have crystal clear 20-20 vision too. If we all get behind this campaign, we can make a huge difference in preventing casualties and making our communities safer places."

Sally Dunscombe, operations director at Brain Injury Group says: "We are delighted to support Road Safety Week and to play our part in making roads safer for people to walk and cycle. We know from our work that motor vehicle crashes account for half of all traumatic brain injuries, causing terrible suffering and turns people's lives upside down. Slowing down to 20mph makes an enormous difference in preventing road casualties as it gives you a better chance of stopping in time in an emergency, such as if a child runs out. As well as preventing devastating casualties, if drivers slow down to 20mph it makes our communities more enjoyable places, where people – particularly children – can get out and about without being endangered. We all have a role to play in making this happen, and Brain Injury Group is committed to playing its part by getting behind this important campaign."

Notes for editors

GO 20 is a partnership campaign being launched by Brake at the start of Road Safety Week 2012 (19-25 November). Find out more at www.go20.org.

Brakeis an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support divisioncares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2012 takes place 19-25 November, with support from headline sponsors Brain Injury Group and Specsavers, plus regional sponsors Woop young driver insurance, Bubblebum UK Ltd, Fleet Support Group and Leigh Day & Co Solicitors.

The Brain Injury Group is the UK's first national network of dedicated brain and head injury lawyers and expert specialists that provides a complete package of support for brain injured people and their families. If you have been affected by brain injury, you can find a local, specialist, skilled brain injury lawyer and other associated support services to help you at www.braininjurygroup.co.uk 

Good eyesight is imperative to road safety, which is why Specsavers has made a longstanding commitment to promoting the importance of clear vision behind the wheel, working alongside the national road safety charity Brake. The Specsavers Drive Safe road show tours events and town centres across the country with its specially designed trailer. Visitors to the trailer are invited to receive free vision and hearing screening, with experts on hand to answer any questions.

Islington Councilis the first local authority in the country to introduce 20mph limits across its roads: main roads as well as side roads. All Islington's side streets became 20mph in 2010, and a year later the council agreed to introduce the same limit on main roads, to improve safety in the inner London borough. Work to install new signs and road markings is due to start later this year, to be completed by spring 2013. A small number of major roads in Islington, managed by Transport for London, will remain at 30mph.


Road crashes are not accidents; the use of the term 'accident' undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by drivers taking risks on roads.

End notes:

[1] 8,061 children gave their views through 'hands-up' surveys in schools across the UK, Brake, 2012

[2] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[3] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[4] Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999

[5] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[6] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[7] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation's Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012. Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers' speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy. Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[8] These figures are from Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2011, and Police recorded injury road traffic collisions and casualties Northern Ireland annual report 2011, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2012. Figures for children were requested from the Department for Transport and Police Service for Northern Ireland and are for children aged 0 – 17.

GO 20 fundraising

GO 20GO 20 in aid of Brake

GO 20 is a campaign by Brake and a coalition of charities calling for action to make walking and cycling safer. When communities 'GO 20? by adopting a 20mph speed limit, and drivers understand those limits and GO 20 or below, it makes our communities safer, healthier, nicer places, helping to bring about fewer casualties, more walking and cycling and less pollution.

You can get behind this important campaign and promote safer roads in your community by GOing 20 yourself in aid of Brake. It's an especially great way to give back to Brake and raise awareness if you're campaigning for 20mph limits in your area.

You could swim 20 lengths, run 20km, or get a team of 20 together to bungee, skydive, buggy-push or anything else! You'll be helping Brake campaign for safer streets and support families devastated by road crashes. Here are a few ideas:

GO 20 on foot or bike

Get sponsored to run, cycle or walk 20 miles or km. You can even join forces with friends or colleagues to do it as a relay, covering 1mile/km each.

GO 20 in the pool

Why not do 20 laps of your local pool? Or get 20 people to swim 20 laps each!

GO 20 as a dare-devil team

Got nerves of steel? Get a team of 20 thrill seekers together to parachute or bungee for Brake.

GO 20 with the kids

Arrange a sponsored toddle or walk – perhaps 20 laps of your local park with swings and ice creams at the end!

GO 20 cycling bonanza

Arrange to take an exercise bike into your workplace or club and run an all-day cycling relay, with each person cycling for 20 minutes.

Got your own GO20 idea?

Get your thinking cap on and come up with your own GO 20 idea! Brake can provide you with a GO20 fundraising pack, containing:

- a Brake t-shirt

- balloons

- sponsorship forms

- posters and leaflets

- fundraising hints and tips

Brake can write a press release to send to local media to help raise awareness about the GO 20 campaign and the wonderful fundraising you're doing for us.

If you're interested contact Lisa on 01484 687257 or email fundraise@brake.org.uk

Government red tape puts brakes on 20mph limits

Wednesday 30 September 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

news@brake.org.uk
 

Stronger national leadership needed to unlock full potential, report finds

A research report released today (30 September 2015) by Brake, the road safety charity, has called for the removal of unnecessary barriers faced by local councils in implementing 20mph speed limits to deliver safer walking and cycling. The report finds that moving to 20mph limits across built up areas would deliver significant safety benefits, especially for pedestrians and cyclists, and suggests red tape and a lack of strong national government leadership is at fault for the current UK postcode lottery when it comes to reaping the benefits of lower traffic speeds in communities.

A freedom of information request submitted by Brake to all 206 local traffic authorities in Great Britain regarding their decisions to implement 20mph limits or not identified some key stumbling blocks, including:

  • Cost. With local authority budgets under severe pressure, many councils view the cost of introducing 20mph limits as prohibitive, with much of the costs (75% in one case) spent on installing repeater signs in line with current regulation. Although many councils recognise this cost is likely to be outweighed in the long run by crash prevention, it is enough to discourage some councils. The government could reduce these costs by amending signage regulation.
  • Central government guidance. The government’s guidance on introducing 20mph limits states trouble-free compliance is likely on roads where average traffic speeds are already 24mph or below [1]. This has been misinterpreted by some councils as meaning 20mph limits should not be introduced on roads with higher average speeds, when doing so has been shown to achieve greater speed reductions. Brake argues the government can show stronger leadership and remove red tape by revising guidance to be less prohibitive.

With 20mph increasingly the norm in urban areas across the UK, Brake advocates making this the national default urban speed limit, alongside its 16 GO 20 coalition partners. This would avoid problems currently experienced by local authorities by only requiring them to spend money signing exceptional roads that are appropriate to remain at 30mph or higher. This would also be easier for drivers to understand and would likely increase compliance and speed reduction.

However, short of changing the urban default, Brake is recommending that major progress could be made in making walking and cycling safer, and big savings achieved, by relaxing regulations on repeater signs on 20mph roads and revising government guidance on setting local speed limits.

Small margins make a big difference

Reaffirming the wide-ranging benefits of 20mph limits, the report found that signs-only 20mph speed limits can be expected to achieve, as a minimum, a 1mph reduction of average traffic speeds, leading to a 6% reduction in collisions. Where limits are backed up with public awareness and enforcement campaigns, speed reductions could be as much as 4mph, reducing collisions by almost a quarter (24%). The report suggests this improvement in safety is likely to have a positive impact on walking and cycling levels, with significant health and environmental benefits.

Dr Tom Fisher, research manager for Brake, said: “At a time when local authority budgets are being slashed by central government, that government has a duty to do what it can to enable those authorities to spend that cash as efficiently as possible. However, when it comes to making streets in their communities safer, the government is tying the hands of cash-strapped councils with out-dated and unnecessary regulation.

“20mph limits are an effective and globally-recognised solution to unacceptably dangerous roads in our cities, towns, and villages. Ultimately, we would like to see 20mph become the default urban speed limit in the UK. In the meantime, the government can remove red tape and show stronger leadership by providing clearer and more positive guidance, and by doing away with the requirement for costly repeater signs.”

About Brake’s GO 20 campaign

Brake is part of a broad coalition of organisations calling for more local authorities to adopt widespread 20mph limits, and for the government to make 20mph the national urban default, through its GO 20 campaignTweet us: @Brakecharity, hashtag #GO20.

Why GO 20?

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have far more time to react in an emergency. Studies show when 20 limits replace 30, there are fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [2].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [3].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution: If more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [4]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [5]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [6]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

Notes for editors

About the report

GO 20: Towards changing the default urban speed limit to 20mph was produced by Brake, the road safety charity, in autumn 2015, with kind sponsorship from Bridgestone. The report is divided into two sections: a literature review exploring current evidence on 20mph limits and their effects, and results of a freedom of information request to local authorities exploring their implementation and experiences of 20mph limits. 122 of 206 local authorities in Great Britain provided a response. Read the full report.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1]Department for Transport circular 01/2013: setting local speed limits, Department for Transport, 2013

[2] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001;  20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[3] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[4] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[5] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[6] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation’s Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012.  Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, the effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy. Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

High profile local MP wins national award for campaign for 20mph speed limits

26 March 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Sadiq Khan, MP for Tooting, has been given a national road safety award by the charity Brake and Direct Line Group for his commitment to increasing the number of 20mph speed limits in his constituency.

Alongside a coalition of Labour councillors and local residents, Sadiq has been campaigning for 20mph limits on residential roads in Tooting for seven years, with the first petitions handed to Wandsworth Borough Council in 2007.

Sadiq has collected hundreds of signatures as part of the campaign, with an overwhelming response from local residents in support of 20mph limits. In June 2013, Sadiq wrote an open letter to the leader of council on residents' behalf, urging them to implement 20mph limits in a number of areas where demand is strongest.

At the start of 2014, Sadiq and local residents convinced Wandsworth Borough Council to consider implementing 20mph limits in areas where at least one in 10 residents are actively calling for it, making it much easier to secure a public consultation.

With his support and that of local councillors, residents of two wards in Sadiq's constituency then submitted a petition to the council asking for 20mph consultations in their areas, and in March 2014, the council agreed.

Up to 30,000 people in the wards of Furzedown and Bedford will now have their say on proposals for every road in their area, bar one or two major routes, to 'GO 20'. The consultation will run until Friday 4 April, and Sadiq is working hard to spread the word via social media and his weekly newsletter, to make sure as many people as possible are heard. So far, residents' responses have been extremely positive; a recent newspaper poll showed 65% in favour.

Road safety remains a big priority for Sadiq, who has a busy parliamentary life as shadow justice secretary and shadow lord chancellor. He says he will continue to push for Wandsworth Borough Council to extend 20mph limits to more wards in his constituency. Sadiq is also supporting a number of community campaigns for safe crossings, including outside Fircroft Primary School and Tooting Leisure Centre.

Find out more about Brake's national GO20 campaign for safe, active, happy communities.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "We are delighted Sadiq has shown such long-standing commitment to 20mph limits, and we hope his campaign will meet with further success. Ultimately, we would like everyone in Tooting, London as a whole, and other cities, towns and villages across the UK to reap the many benefits of 20mph limits. That's why we're campaigning nationally for all our communities to 'GO 20' and for drivers to slow down in built up areas, to make our streets safer and more pleasant for walking and cycling. We believe everyone should be able to walk and cycle in their area, for their health and enjoyment, and as a cheap and sustainable way to commute and get about, without being put in danger by traffic. 20mph limits help people to do just that."

Sadiq Khan, MP for Tooting, said: "Throughout my nine years as the local MP, I have campaigned alongside the local community to make our roads safer. Together we have successfully fought for more road safety measures outside local schools, more pedestrian crossings on dangerous roads, and we have long campaigned for more 20mph zones in residential areas. More 20mph zones would help reduce both the risk and severity of collisions as well as encouraging more people to walk and cycle.

"After many years and many petitions, this year we finally convinced Wandsworth Council to take action, which is a real testament to the hard work and determination of everyone involved in our campaign. The consultation is taking place in two wards in my constituency and I am working hard to spread the message to make sure local people have their say. Going forward, I also want to see the council consult on introducing them in the other five wards in my constituency; we can't allow the council to drag their heels on this any longer.

"Brake do a fantastic job of campaigning to make our roads safer all over the UK, and it is a real pleasure to win this road safety award."

Notes for editors

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or on-line.

Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. UK Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0845 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com.

Increase in road casualties should be wake up call for politicians, says charity

Thursday 5 February 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Road safety charity Brake has expressed dismay at an increase in road casualties announced today, and is calling on all political parties to commit to three vital road safety policies, especially to protect pedestrians, cyclists, children and young people. The figures show that deaths and serious injuries on UK roads increased by 4% in the year ending September 2014, with deaths up by 1%.

In total, 1,730 people were killed and 22,630 seriously injured on UK roads in the year ending September 2014, up from 1,711 deaths and 21,728 serious injuries in the previous year. Casualties of all severities are also up by 5%, from 184,087 to 192,910.

Casualties are up for all types of road user, with child and cyclist casualties of particular concern:

  • Child deaths and serious injuries are up by 3% to 2,060, with casualties of all severities up by 6% to 16,640 – the first rise in rolling year comparisons for 20 years.
  • Cyclist deaths and serious injuries are up 8% to 3,500.

Brake is calling on all political parties to make three, key general election manifesto commitments to get casualties falling again and enable everyone to get around safely, sustainably and actively:

  • Change the default urban speed limit to 20mph to protect people on foot and bike, and allow everyone to walk and cycle without fear. Read about the GO 20 campaign.
  • Introduce graduated driver licensing, to allow new drivers to build skills and experience gradually while exposed to less danger. Read about the too young to die campaign.
  • Introduce a zero-tolerance drink drive limit of 20mg per 100ml of blood, to stamp out the menace of drink driving once and for all. Read about the not a drop, not a drag campaign.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“These casualty increases are the tragic result of a failure of ambition. They come on the back of three years of flat-lining road death and serious injury figures, during which the government congratulated itself on having ‘some of the safest roads in the world’, rather than making forward thinking decisions and setting targets to secure further reductions. We need a commitment to a long-term vision of nobody being killed or seriously injured on our roads, rather than settling for the status quo. Every road casualty causes appalling suffering, and every one can be prevented, but only if we make the right moves.

“Global research and experience clearly points to the policies that prevent road casualties and the resultant suffering, and enable people to get around through healthy and sustainable means. Based on this evidence, we’re appealing to all political parties to include three key life-saving measures in manifestos: graduated driver licensing, a 20mph default urban speed limit, and a zero-tolerance drink drive limit. We’re in no doubt these measures would put us back on the path of stopping needless loss of life on our roads, and creating safer streets and communities for all.”

Brake provides support for people bereaved and injured in road crashes. Find out more atwww.brake.org.uk/support.

Notes for editors

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.