Articles Tagged ‘children - Brake the road safety charity’

A road safety policy for your school or nursery

Below is a template road safety policy that schools and nurseries can use and adapt according to your needs. It provides a bedrock on which you can build a range of road safety initiatives to help pupils and others in your community to be safe. Use our guide to teaching road safety to develop your initiatives.

OUR SCHOOL/NURSERY ROAD SAFETY POLICY

  1. The safety of our children will always come first. Our most important priority is to prevent the death or injury of a child while in our care.

  2. If out and about with pupils on foot, we will always prioritise walking safely, in line with the latest safety advice.

  3. If transporting pupils by vehicle, we will always prioritise doing so safely, in line with the latest safety advice.

  4. We will teach road safety within the classroom, integrating into project work in a range of curriculum lessons as well as teaching separately in safety and citizenship lessons, and reviewing the amount and quality annually.

  5. (For establishments with available safe road environments.) We will teach practical pedestrian and cycle training at the roadside in line with best practice advice.

  6. We will get involved in useful awareness-raising initiatives that promote road safety in our wider community, such as Road Safety Week, Beep Beep! Day for pre-schoolers and Brake's Giant Walk for primary pupils.

  7. We will aim to improve the safety and environmental standards of transport to and from our premises by having a School Travel Plan that aims to reduce use of cars and improve the safety of children on foot or bikes and that we implement and update annually.

 

Advice for parents and families

As a parent, you will have understandable road safety concerns for your child which are likely to change as your child gets older. Road crashes are the biggest cause of death among 5-25 year-olds. But there are key steps you can take to help protect your child. This page provides simple advice from your child's birth to reaching the age when they may start learning to drive or be a passenger with other young drivers.

You can also read our advice for children and teenagers.

And why not make the Brake Pledge as a family, to show your commitment to road safety?

If you work with infants, either as a childminder, in a pre-school, play group or nursery, you might be interested in running a Beep Beep! Day. Find out more.

KIDS IN CARS

Child seats

✔ Never hold a child in your arms in a vehicle - use a modern child seat suitable for their size and weight. Keep using a child or booster seat appropriate for your child’s size until they’re 150cm tall. Buy one with the United Nations E mark or BS Kitemark and don’t use second-hand.

✔ Follow the fitting instructions exactly. If possible, fit the seat in the middle of the back of your car. If you need to use a taxi, book one you can fit your baby seat into.

à Take a look at our letter to parents on 2017 car seat law changes.

à Read more advice on baby seats and child restraints.

Safe vehicles and safe driving

✔ The safety of your child in cars also depends on the protection provided by the vehicle. If you're buying a car, check out its crash test rating and buy the safest you can.

✔ The other critical factor is your driving. So stay well within speed limits, never drive after drinking any alcohol or when stressed, tired or distracted, and switch off your phone.

à Make the Brake Pledge to commit to safe driving.

Accepting lifts from friends and relatives

✔ It is just as important that your child is appropriately restrained in other people's cars, and driven slowly and safely. If you are unsure, don't let them go. In some situations it might be socially awkward, but the safety of your child must always be priority.

FAMILIES ON FOOT

Buggies and push chairs

✔ If you use a buggy or push chair, strap in your child securely and keep the buggy well back from the edge of the road when getting ready to cross. If you can carry the weight, front and back carriers are a safer way to carry babies near busy roads, and mean your hands are free.

✔ If you use a buggy on hilly streets, use a strap that goes around your wrist and the buggy handle; it means if you slip and let go, the buggy won't roll away.

GO20AlexRoadSideHolding hands

✔ When your child first starts to walk with you, talk to them about how they must always hold your hand. Make sure hand-holding is your number one rule your child always follows, especially when crossing roads. If your child is likely to pull away from you, use safety reins or a wrist strap.

Teach road safety

✔ Teach road safety to your child from the age of two using fun games and rhymes. You can use our Beep Beep! Day activities for fun ways to teach road safety. Make sure they understand the meaning of stop, go, traffic, danger, look, listen, walk don't run, and other key road safety words.

à Encourage your child's nursery, playgroup or school to run take part in a Beep Beep! Day or Brake's Kids Walk.

Nursery/school trips

✔ If your child is going on a nursery or school trip by coach or minibus, check if they are using a modern vehicle with three-point seatbelts.

à See our advice for teachers on school trips and check if the nursery or school is following this advice.

When to allow your child to walk on their own around local roads

✔ Children under eight should always be accompanied by and hold hands with an adult around roads, particularly when crossing.

✔ When your child reaches the age of eight, you should consider whether to allow them to walk independently. It can be a tough decision as you will need to consider their development and weigh up the benefits of them being active and healthy with traffic danger in your area.

✔ When you decide to let your child walk independently, remind them about the importance of crossing safely using the Green Cross Code, paying attention to the road, and help them to plan the safest possible route (along quiet, slow roads with pavements or traffic-free paths) to school, the park or their friends' houses.

✔ If you are concerned about traffic danger in your area, such as due to fast traffic or a lack of pavements, you could also start a campaign for a 20mph limit or pavements and crossings, or whatever your community needs, using Brake’s advice.

✔ You can also encourage your child's school to organise practical pedestrian training, which is usually offered by local authority road safety teams.

à Read our advice for teachers on pedestrian and cycle training.

CYCLING

Whether to allow your child to cycle on roads in your communityGO20FamilyCrossingRoadsmall

✔ Brake recommends that children under 10 don’t cycle on roads. Many roads are unsafe for children, particularly fast and bendy rural roads and busy town roads without separate space for cyclists.

✔ Happily, some communities now have great cycling facilities, including separate paths for cyclists, which can be a great way for children to start enjoying the benefits of cycling while they are safe from traffic.

à If your area doesn’t have cycling facilities, why not start a campaign.

✔ You can also help your child gain experience through cycle training arranged through their school or the local authority. Even if it's not safe for them to cycle on local roads, this is helpful for them starting to gain experience, and great if you are planning a cycling holiday.

✔ Make sure their bike is well-maintained with working brakes and lights, which they should use in poor visibility, although cycling in the dark is best avoided.

✔ If your child cycles on roads, help them plan the safest possible routes making use of traffic-free paths and quiet, slow roads. Tell them to get off and walk their bike on the pavement if they have to negotiate any busy junctions.

à Read more advice for cyclists.

TEENS AND YOUNG PEOPLE

Going to secondary school

✔ Your child's risk of being injured on foot or on a bicycle increases as they gain independence – far more teens are knocked down and hurt than younger children. Peer pressure can also cause children to behave unsafely. Keep talking about road safety with your child, ensure they know the importance of continuing to take great care when crossing including putting their phone away and taking earphones out, and help them plan the safest possible routes in your area.

à Teens can get advice and resources, and watch videos on road safety in Brake’s young people and road safety section.

2Y2DYoungDriver2Accepting lifts from mates

✔ Talk to your son or daughter about the dangers of accepting lifts from mates driving cars or motorbikes. Young drivers, young males in particular, are the highest risk group of drivers due to their age and inexperience: this means they are particularly likely to take risks and less able to cope with hazards.

✔ It’s safest to avoid lifts altogether with young drivers, or at least don’t get a lift with someone you don’t trust completely to drive under speed limits, completely sober, and focused on the road.

✔ Agree with your son or daughter that you will always pick them up if they are stuck and need you to, even if it's late at night. Make sure they're always able to get hold of you if they need to, and tell them they can call you any time, day or night. It might be an inconvenience, but better safe than sorry. If you don't drive, give your son or daughter emergency numbers and tell them you have cash in the house to pay for it in case they get stranded without a lift and need to get home.

Learning to drive

✔ Many young people see driving as their route to independence. But the younger someone learns to drive, the greater the risk of them crashing and being seriously hurt or killed.

✔ There is often no need for young people to drive or own a car; it's dangerous, expensive, and harmful to the environment. Help your son or daughter to look at the alternatives to driving and understand the benefits of not driving, especially the money they will save. If they are going on to further education, they will probably be living somewhere with access to public transport. Encourage them to spend their cash on something more constructive than a car, such as a great holiday.

✔ If they are determined to learn to drive, you could offer an incentive to delay, for example offering to pay for their driving lessons if they wait until they are 21, or funding their use of public transport in the meantime.

Advice for young people

à Young people who are non-drivers, learners or already driving, can read our advice, explore our young people and road safety section, and make the Brake Pledge.

Read more and take action:

   -   Make the Brake Pledge with your family
   -   Explore Brake’s training and resources for engaging young people 
   -   Check out Brake’s projects for schools and nurseries
   -   Get involved in Road Safety Week
   -   Get advice on running a road safety campaign in your area
   -   Donate to Brake or fundraise in your community

An introduction to teaching road safety

Engaged in the right way, children and young people can really enjoy studying and campaigning for road safety because it is an issue they can understand and that affects them. And teaching road safety is a great way for you to reach goals for citizenship, health and safety and across the curriculum. This page provides an introduction to teaching road safety effectively and why it is such an important topic to teach.

Sensitivity issues
Before teaching road safety, check whether any children have been bereaved by, or hurt in, or witnessed a serious a road crash, and be sensitive to their needs. Talk to them and their carers about whether they wish to be excluded from classroom lessons that discuss death or injury. Brake has developed resources for children bereaved by road crashes and their carers. Call our help line 0845 603 8570 to obtain these resources.

Why road safety is an important teaching topic
Every death of a child is devastating for a nursery, school or college. You can play a vital role in protecting children by incorporating road safety into lessons and engaging in activities to get life-saving messages across to pupils, parents and throughout the local community. You also have a responsibility to ensure high standards of road safety when on trips away from your school on foot or by vehicle. You are also at the heart of a community and therefore well placed to work with local government to implement necessary road safety engineering improvements, such as crossings or lower speed limits, on local roads.

Road safety also falls within curriculum requirements. It appears in different parts of the curriculum in different parts of Britain. In England, for example, road safety education is part of the statory frameworks for PSHE and citizenship at key stages 1 and 2. It also can be linked to the wider curriculum, in subject areas such as geography, maths and science. For more on prioritising road safety to meet curriculum requirements, see the Department of Transport's guidance on delivering road safety education in your early years setting or school.

When explaining to colleagues why you want to focus on road safety, you might want to mention these 7 important points:

  1. For every child killed, about ten more are seriously injured, causing brain injuries, paralysis and limb loss. These are horrendous, life-changing injuries for a child. Every community is affected by road death and injury at some stage.
  2. Many of these deaths and injuries will not hit the headlines, and only be reported in local press, so the problem is bigger than you may imagine; death on the road is the biggest killer of older children and young people in the UK.
  3. The UK has one of the worst child road death rates in Europe.
  4. It is particularly important to focus on road safety if you have busy fast roads in your community, or if you are based in an area with deprived families. Deprived children are much more likely to die on roads than more well-off children who have large gardens and cars.
  5. Poor road safety engineering (high speed limits, lack of cycle paths, lack of crossings) is one of the biggest causes of poor child health, because children and their parents choose, due to the danger, not to walk or cycle, and take the car instead.
  6. Boys are much more likely to die or be hurt than girls. They are more inclined to take risks on foot, bicycles, and when a novice driver.
  7. The older children get, the more at risk they become, as they gain independence. So road safety is not just a topic for young children.

Classroom teaching is more effective if combined with practical experiences and campaigning
Effective road safety learning involves three components: classroom teaching, roadside experiences and training and then, best of all, getting the children working within your community to campaign for road safety.

Effective road safety teaching needs to:

  • Build on existing knowledge, not preach
  • Require children to think for themselves
  • Be discussive and creative and related to real life

Children need to be taught their road safety ABC:

A is for awareness (traffic is dangerous and hurts people)
B is for behaviour (rules you must follow to stay safer)
C is for choice and community campaigning (how to make the safest choices and to help others make these choices too)

Under 8’s can be taught A and B from the age of two upwards. They can be taught rules and encouraged to follow them through practical training. However, under 8’s should never use roads without an adult, and adults should follow the Green Cross Code at all times when on foot with their children. Adults should, at all times, hold children’s hands or use reins with younger children because under 8’s:
-have difficulty judging speed and distance;
-are easily distracted and act on impulse;
-have difficulty understanding danger and death and are oriented around play;
-are small (so can’t see hazards) and are still developing eyesight and hearing;
-should never be allowed to walk near roads on their own for these reasons and more. -are carefree, not careless!

Over 8’s will have more ability to understand C, and make their own choices based on different options and assessment of risk. However, they need to have A and B re-emphasised to them because over 8’s:
-may walk on their own but make mistakes that can cost their lives because of lack of experience;
-are vulnerable to peer pressure from other children to make risky choices, such as running across a road.

The following sections list teaching topics within the road safety ABC.

A is for awareness: Traffic is dangerous and hurts people
You can teach, with increasing frankness as children get older, that:

  • Traffic hurts thousands of people every year.
  • People hurt by traffic are often killed and seriously injured. Injuries include paralysis and losing limbs. (Note: many children may think minor injuries such as breaking an arm are OK, or even fun, because it draws attention to them.)
  • Some people do dangerous things when walking or cycling, such as texting on their mobile while crossing a road. These people are more likely to be killed or hurt.
  • Some drivers break laws, which increases the chance of you being killed or hurt - for example, speeding, or driving when drunk. We have laws such as speed limits to stop people being killed or hurt in crashes, but some drivers break laws.

B is for behaviour: Rules you can follow to stay safe
Children need to be taught the language of road safety before they can understand the rules! For example, names of vehicles, names of street furniture such as pavements and kerbs, and an understanding of fast, slow, looking, listening and crossing. A well-educated reception age child should already have a grasp of fundamental road safety rules thanks to their parents. However, others may not have benefited from this care. Therefore, you will have to begin by checking that all children understand the following:

  • Pavements are for people; roads are for traffic.
  • Never go out near roads without a grown up. Hold their hand and don’t let go.
  • Stop at once if you are told. Never try to cross a road until you are told.
  • Never run or play near roads - play in a park or garden.
  • You can help grown ups look and listen for traffic.
  • Lollipop people, pelican crossings and zebra crossings help people cross the road. When a red man appears, it means you must stop.
  • You can wear bright clothes to be seen by traffic.
  • In a car, never undo your belt and don’t play with door handles or try to get out.

By the age of 5, children are ready to learn, in addition to the above:

  • The Crossing Code (find a safe place to cross, stop, look, listen, cross with care)
  • The safest places to cross: underpasses; footbridges; where there is a lollipop person; pelican and puffin crossings; zebra crossings.
  • In a car, only get out on the pavement side.
  • In a bus or coach or minibus, wear your seat belt if one is fitted. When getting off, never cross the road in front or behind the bus. Wait until it has pulled away so you can see in all directions.

By the age of 9 and upwads, depending on development, children are ready to explore:

  • Bereavement issues and the social and economic impacts of road crashes.
  • The responsibilities of drivers.
  • The dangers of giving in to peer pressure to take risks.

Read more about teaching older pupils further down.

C is for choice: How to make the safest choices and help others stay safe too
Under-8’s are ill-equipped to make their own choices. However, it is important that older children recognise their ability to make safe choices, recognise pressures they may come under to make dangerous choices and learn how to resist those pressures, and how to speak up for the safety of others too. Younger children can also be encouraged to think about choices, as long as they are not encouraged to make those choices on their own. All children can be encouraged to speak out against dangerous behaviour, such as children pushing each other into the road, or running across roads without looking, or drivers driving too fast, or people not doing up their seatbelts.

Teaching road safety to children and young people aged 11-20

Pupils aged 11-20 may initially think that road safety is for ‘babies’ and ‘boring’, but most young people have a lot to say about road safety and won’t find it boring as long as it’s taught well! In fact, effective road safety teaching with these age ranges enables you to explore challenging and worth-while areas, including:

  • Death and bereavement
  • Life-changing injuries (paralysis and brain injury) and how this affects people and their families
  • Taking responsibility for others in the context of good citizenship - particularly if we are driving
  • Our addiction to cars and how they affect communities
  • The battle of the sexes - differences in risk-taking behaviour among males and females
  • Alcohol and drugs - the rise in binge-driving and drug use among young people, linked with the issue of drink-driving
  • The power of adrenalin and testosterone to negate concerns for personal safety

There are a number of reasons that pupils may not initially be receptive to road safety teaching because of poor attitudes. For example, they may:

  1. Think they ‘know it all’ and road safety is for ‘babies’;
  2. Already be taking extreme risks on roads (for example, mucking about on foot on busy roads, driving without a licence or taking illegal drugs and driving);
  3. Feel invincible - road crashes happen to someone else, not them. They think their youth and fast reaction times will keep them out of trouble;
  4. Have a misunderstanding of the true extent of deaths and injuries on roads and just how at risk they are, particularly as young people.

On the positive side, young people are likely to:

  • Have witnessed risky behaviour on roads and grasp road safety issues easily as they deal with roads every day;
  • Have experienced, or heard of, someone in their community being hurt or killed in a road crash, and therefore understand that death and serious injury is a reality on roads.

Effective road safety teaching for this age range should:

  • Build on pupils’ existing knowledge, not preach;
  • Require pupils to think for themselves and conduct original research;
  • Be discussive and creative, and related to pupils’ real lives;
  • Involve real-life projects (such as devising and running a campaign to get parents and pupils to ‘belt up’) not just class-room learning;
  • Explore the dangers of risk-taking;
  • Explain clearly that road safety is about stopping deaths and life-long serious injuries and therefore it is crucial to take it seriously - particularly as these pupils are in the highest risk group for dying on roads.

Now plan your lessons!
Go back to Teaching resources for lesson ideas, downloads, web links and more advice.

Beep Beep! Day

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Every year thousands of tots and infants aged 2-7 take part in a special Beep Beep! Day organised by their school, nursery, playgroup or childminder, to help save little lives. It's a great way to engage children with the road safety basics through fun activities, while raising awareness among parents and the wider community about protecting children on roads.

We produce brand new free and low-cost resources to help you run your events and reinforce those important road safety messages. Our national dates for 2019 are:

Wednesday 20 March
Wednesday 17 July
Wednesday 20 November, During UK Road Safety Week 2019

Use the button below to register for free. Everyone who registers will receive a free e-resource pack or for a small fee you can receive our Beep Beep! Day bumper resource pack!

REGISTER NOW

 
The Bumper Pack contains stickers and certificates for all children taking part, posters to promote your event to parents, a hand print poster for children to learn about holding hands, laminated activity and song cards, a large road map, activity poster with cut-out shapes, and even balloons!

Order your pack here for just £12.60 (per 50 children, including VAT) or email beepbeep@brake.org.uk.

If you have already purchased a bumper pack for a previous event, you can buy a replenishment pack to top up your stickers and certificates. These are just £6.60 ( per 50 children, including VAT) and also include our themed resources for your event. Please call us on 01484 550061 to pay by card or email us for any other method of payment.

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Running a Beep Beep! Day is also a great way to raise valuable funds for Brake's work, by inviting tots to come along to the day dressed in their brightest clothes in return for a donation to Brake. Funds raised go towards Brake's work supporting families bereaved by road crashes and campaigning for road safety. You can get some great ideas for fundraising here. For more inspiration take a look at what everyone got up to in 2017.

 

Already got a bumper pack?
If you have already bought a bumper pack and can reuse some of the resources, then why not add to it with our add-on bundle, which includes new resources on one of the four themes, plus extra stickers, certificates and balloons. Order this for just £6.60 (per 50 children and inclusive of VAT) or email beepbeepday@brake.org.uk.

You can also browse our online guides to teaching road safety to help you take action on road safety on any day of the year.

Do you know anyone else who would like to run a Beep Beep! Day? Share our marketing flyer with them!
Need it in Welsh? View our Welsh flyer.

Once you have run your Beep Beep! Day, please let us know how it went by filling in our online feedback form. Everyone who gives us their valuable feedback will receive a free thank you letter and certificate in the post. If you don’t have time to give us feedback you can still receive your certificate, just drop us a line to let us know your event took place.

If you would like to receive information about other opportunities and events please sign up at our preference centre.

Find out what happened in previous years:
 

A huge thank you to our Beep Beep! Day sponsor Churchill.
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Beep Beep! Day 2019

Fill out my online form.
PLEASE NOTE: If you are purchasing a bumper pack, it will be sent out around two weeks before your planned event.

Beep Beep! Day Resources

If you register to run a Beep Beep! Day we will send you some great resources such as posters, stickers and certificates for the kids, a giant poster for kids to put paint hand prints on, and sponsorship envelopes.

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Beep Beep! Day: fundraising

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. The money you raise supports this vital work.

Funds raised for Brake through events such as Beep Beep! Day help us to support bereaved and injured victims of road crashes, to campaign on various issues including for 20mph limits and crossings in communities.

Fundraising ideas for Beep Beep! Days

There are many ways you can raise money for Brake as part of your Beep Beep! Day event. Below are a few examples of fundraisers that other organisations have run and you can find more examples on our fundraising pages:

  • Have a bake sale! Baking is back in fashion and is an easy way for children to raise money for Brake. Make your favourite cupcakes or try our traffic light biscuit recipe and then sell them to parents, staff and pupils.
  • Hold a bring-and-buy sale or fun day and invite parents and local residents to have a stall or attend on the day, with proceeds going towards Brake.
  • Have a fun dress-down day! Encourage all the children to come to school dressed in bright clothes and donate a pound to raise money for Brake.
  • Play 'name the teddy' and give children the chance to win a cute teddy bear. Download our Name-the-bear Sheet; choose a name for the bear and seal it in an envelope. Charge £2 per guess. When the sheet is complete, announce the winner, who wins the teddy and donate the funds to Brake.
  • Guess how many sweets are in a jar.  Find a glass bottle; fill it with sweets of your choice, decorate
    with a ribbon and make it look attractive, count the sweets and seal the answer in an envelope. Charge £2 per guess. When the sheet is complete, announce the winner, who wins the sweets and donate the funds to Brake.

How your fundraising can make a difference:

£10 allows Brake to provide a free picture book for a child who has been bereaved in a road crash, to help them begin understand their loss, and guidance to their carers

£50 enables us to operate our helpline for an hour, supporting people affected by road crashes

£150 enables Brake to train 20 people to become campaigners for road safety in their community

£450 helps Brake to coordinate a road safety media campaign in a local community to help make their roads safer

pdf-bookFunds also help us produce resources such as our 'Someone has died in a road crash books' (pictured), which help children who have suffered the death of a loved one in a road crash. To order a copy, call 01484 559909 or email admin@brake.org.uk. You can also go to www.suddendeath.org, a Brake project committed to sharing best practice research and resources for professionals working with people affected by sudden bereavement. 

Return to the main Beep Beep! Day page.

 

 

Beep Beep! Days 2015 - what happened

 

Read on to find out about Beep Beep! Days that took part in 2015, helping children aged 2-7 learn about road safety and raising valuable funds for Brake's work too. Find out more tips for your Beep Beep! Day.  

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DSC 0578crop CopyCopyCorrine Foster Childminding ran a Beep Beep! Day on our first national date in March 2015. Fifteen children from the childminders took part in the event learning road safety basics. Using support from Brake, including using our template press release, local papers The Dronfield Eye and The Dronfield Advertiser covered the event. 

 

 

 

Funkidoo Childminding in Bath ran a Beep Beep! DayDSC 0772 copycopy in March. Lucy Giffen from Funkiddo childminding chose to run a Beep Beep! Day fundraiser after a recent bereavement due to a road crash in the local area, to help support Brake's campaigns for safer roads to prevent future tragedies. 50 children took part in their event which was supported by the local fire and rescue service who bought a fire engine for the children to look at. 

 

IMG 2315Diana Pawsey ran a Beep Beep! Day on the second national date of the year in July at her childminding setting. Using one of Brake's new bumper resource packs they ran a range of events for the children, including using the activity cards to teach the children road safety songs, which they now sing on their walk to and from school. They also raised £20.00 to support Brake's campaigns and support services. 

 

 

 

 

Eardisley CE Primary SchoolIn March twent-six children from the nursery and reception classes of Eardisley CE Primary School ran a Beep Beep! Day. Using the bumper resource pack from Brake they ran a range of road safety activities, learning about being safe around roads in the school playground, creating posters to display in a 'road safety window' to show to parents, made traffic light biscuits, and learned road safety songs.

 

 

  

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 The children at Larbert Day Nursery in Falkirk enjoyed a whole week filled with activities for Road Safety Week. They were visited by the local lollipop lady, fire brigade and police to learn some road safety basics while engaging with their community. They ran a Beep Beep! Day on the final national event of the year, and enjoyed riding their bikes round the nursery gardens, while fundraising for Brake. 

Beep Beep! Days 2016 - what happened

In 2016 more than 240,000 children aged 2-7 registered to take part in road safety activities and raised valuable funds for Brake's work too. Beep Beep! Days took place on 9 March, 13 July and 23 November 2016, during Road Safety Week 2016. Click here to register now or find out the dates for 2017. You can email beepbeep@brake.org.uk for more information and to find out tips for your Beep Beep! Day.

 

 

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The whole nursery got involved in First Steps Nursery’s Beep Beep! Day. From the babies learning about the different colours such as red means stop and green means go, to the pre-school aged children making their own cars, all of the little ones were informed about how to be safe near roads. Everyone had lots of fun running around outside too, pretending to lollipop people and telling each other when to “stop” and “go”! They even had a working traffic light to understand when adults must stop for children and wore bright clothes to raise money for Brake.

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The fundraising efforts of Westfield School Junior House, in Newcastle, were fantastic, with children and staff raising an amazing £300 for Brake. The event was supported by a local traffic police officer who came and gave talks and interacted with the children promoting road safety. The younger children combined their Beep Beep! Day with other activities, such as outdoor role play, practicing holding hands and learning the Green Cross Code. Some of the Year 6 pupils organised a “Whacky Wednesday” theme to help the fundraising efforts too. In total 42 children participated throughout the school - helping reinforce those important road safety messages. 

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More than 50 children took part in Beecroft Academy’s Beep Beep! Day in Dunstable. They had lots of fun making traffic light biscuits and using the colouring sheets and resources from the e-pack.
The children practised crossing the road safely with adults and learned about the importance of keeping away from traffic. They also looked at the roles of traffic lights and a lollipop person. Beecroft Academy raised a fantastic £53 for Brake.

 

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Suzanne Preston from Corby Borough Council ran a fantastic day at Weldon Pre-School. The children talked about road safety, reinforcing the key messages about how to keep safe when near roads. They had lots of fun creating hand print posters to emphasise the importance of holding hands when crossing the road. Anita from Corby Police also paid a visit and brought a police van which the children loved looking at and even got to sit in! Their bumper pack gave them lots of ideas and resources for the future, supporting their programme of activities and workshops within the neighbourhood.

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In London, Packington Children’s Centre made lots of noise learning the road safety songs and singing about traffic lights. They also got their hands messy making red and green men out of dough and traffic lights out of different coloured card. They also used their creations to talk about the colour order of traffic lights and used role play in different situations, learning how important it is to be safe near roads. 

 

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The children at Beth’s Childminding in Kent had lots of fun during their Beep Beep! Day by using Brake’s bumper resource pack. Childminder Beth used our Road Activity Poster to help the children understand the language around road safety and got them talking about the importance of holding hands while creating their very own colourful Hand Print Poster. Beth used the other activity sheets and a Zak toy to help the children understand important road safety messages and even made yummy traffic light biscuits.
Beth said: “I was really impressed with the amount of resources in the bumper pack. The activity poster was the children's favourite activity to do from the pack, which they continued to play with during the week.”

 

 

road safety 15Our bumper pack was put to good use at Little Darling Childcare in London. The children learned about road signs, traffic lights and talked about how to use these to cross the road safely. They donned their aprons to make traffic light biscuits, took part in some colouring activities and even had a puppet story. They also made a video singing the Driver Song from one of Brake’s activity cards.
Take a look at their video!  

 

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The children at St Peter’s Catholic Primary School in Merseyside ran a Beep Beep! Day alongside lots of different activities throughout Road Safety Week 2016. Each day they focused on a different Brake Pledge element and talked about the importance of each aspect. The children also had a talk from a police officer and created some road safety drawings and models in class.

 

 

IMG 0855 SmallBrake mascot Zak the Zebra visited First Class Nursery’s Beep Beep! Day in Huddersfield. He helped the children with their activity poster, identifying safety elements around the road scene. The children also did some role play, learning how to cross the road safely with one of the children dressing up as a lollypop lady. It got very messy as the children covered their hands in traffic light coloured paint to learn the importance of holding hands while around roads. To finish off, Zak gave the children stickers and certificates to take home to parents.

Beep Beep! Days 2017 - what happened

In 2017, almost 19,000 children took part in road safety activities and raise valuable funds for Brake with events on Wednesday 15 February, Wednesday 10 May, Wednesday 27 September and Wednesday 22 November. Click here to register for our events in 2018. You can email beepbeep@brake.org.uk for more information and to find out tips for your Beep Beep! Day.

 

Havering1

The London Borough of Havering bought a whopping 250 Beep Beep! Day Bumper Packs from us so they could give them to their local nurseries for free. We even produced tailored resources with their logo on. The council is distributing them across the borough throughout 2017 to help nurseries improve road safety.

Work for a local authority or company? Why not do the same? It's a great initiative to involve your local community . Send us an email to find out how we can work with you. 

Outside 1Staff from Warburtons’ Basingstoke Distribution Centre, in Hampshire, ran a very busy Beep Beep! Day at Kempshott Infants School. The children heard about the importance of walking safely, using seatbelts and holding hands. Warburtons even took one of their lorries so the children could talk about stopping distances and the difference between the lorry being hard and children being soft, which means it can hurt them. Children also sat in the lorry to understand the basics of blind spots and the difficulties faced by drivers.

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Our bumper packs were put to good use at Drybrook Primary School in Gloucestershire. The school held a whole week of road safety activities, learning about how to keep themselves and their loved ones safe. The children had road safety assemblies, played games and took part in quizzes. They had a visit from the police and their school crossing patrol officer. The children were taught about the importance of staying away from traffic and how to cross the road safely with an adult. They also raised an amazing £185 by dressing in bright clothes and selling Brake badges and wristbands.
  

image1As well as taking part in Brake’s abseil, Michelle Ralph from Hampshire has been encouraging her children’s nursery/school to learn all about road safety. Michelle has been fundraising for Brake after her uncle was killed in a road crash in October 2016 and wants the children and parents to understand the importance of road safety. They took part in lots of fun activities by using our bumper pack. They also did a quiz on road safety, stop and go games, discussions about road safety and each child’s journey to school and how it can be safe. Along with her sister Danielle, Michelle is aiming to raise more than £1,500 for Brake!

IMG 1018 SMALLZak the Zebra visited Beaumont Primary Academy in Huddersfield to help the children with their Beep Beep! Day. They enjoyed using our global resources that were produced as part of UN Road Safety Week. The children got to see how other kids travel to school across the world by using our map and colouring sheets, and got very messy and colourful learning about the importance of holding hands with grown-ups by creating a hand print poster. Zak, teachers and children then walked to highlight safe routes and crossing places.

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William Fletcher School in Oxford had a very busy Beep Beep! Day. As well as using our resources, the school used other road safety books and presentations to build a day of activities. The children made road signs, traffic lights and lollipops so they could identify when cars need to stop and put their knowledge in to practice on a large road map. The children made traffic light biscuits, coloured in our colouring sheets and had lots of fun singing road safety songs. Important messages were then sent home to parents in the form of a road safety activity pack and guide for the children to continue their activities and share their knowledge. The children also raised £30 for Brake.

20170510 135343 SMALLAll year groups got involved at Broadfields School in London. The nursery children practised crossing the road on a zebra crossing, while reception class learned the importance of holding hands with an adult and made posters for their parents. Year One and Two classes went out to their school minibus and talked about the importance of wearing seatbelts, while children in Year Three learned about travel from around the world and the safest ways to get to school. Children in Year Four and Six discussed the importance of crossing the road safely and played road safety games. And Year Five pupils got creative and wrote poems to promote walking to school, road safety and reducing pollution. Due to the focus on road safety, the school had a record number of children on their walking bus as lots of children walked, cycled and scooted to school for the first time!

stoswald

Children and parents at St Oswald’s Praise & Play in Cheshire loved getting involved with their Beep Beep! Day. They worked together to learn about safe routes to walk and the importance of crossing the road safely when with adults. The group was visited by their local Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) to help run the activities, which included the children dressing up as a lollypop person. The group also raised more than £40 for Brake. The money will go towards the charity's work campaigning for safer roads and supporting bereaved and seriously injured road crash victims.

McGee

Brake corporate partner McGee visited Sir John Cass’s Foundation Primary School in the City of London to help them run a Beep Beep! Day in June. Alongside the City of London Corporation Road Safety Team, they engaged 240 children in the importance of road safety. The children learned about the dangers of adults speeding in their community and McGee staff delivered interactive workshops with the older children, using resources through Brake’s road safety poster competition.


RSW17 Lasswade Primary School
The children at Lasswade Primary School in Bonnyrigg, Scotland, loved their Beep Beep! Day event in November. They took part in lots of different activities including making great use of our bumper pack of resources. The children learned about the importance of holding hands with an adult when crossing the road and used our hand print poster to create colourful artwork. The nursery children took their hand print posters, certificates and stickers home with them, to help raise awareness to their grown-ups.

 

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Hexham Children’s Centre
in Northumberland had a busy Beep Beep! Day during Road Safety Week 2017 by incorporating activities within their ‘learning together through play’ session. The children, with help from their grown-up, made traffic light sandwiches and created collage car pictures. They played a game with playdough, matching red, yellow and green to traffic light pictures to identify when they need to stop and when it’s safe to cross the road with an adult. Their neighbourhood police officer also paid a visit and brought along a police van for the children to explore. The children centre made sure adults got involved with the event too, so they understood how they can help keep children safe on our roads.

Brake backs Walk to School Week – a healthier and happier start to the day for you and the planet

News from Brake

16 May 2016
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, is encouraging families to get out of their cars and on to their feet as part of Living Streets’ Walk to School Week.

Half of our children are driven to school, yet the average school run for primary age children is just 1.5 miles.[i]

Average walking trips per person have decreased by 27% since 1995, with walking now making up just over a fifth (22%) of trips in Britain.[ii]

In that time congestion and air pollution have increased, as have our waistlines, with childhood obesity being described be experts as an epidemic.

Driving less means there will be less harmful pollution pumped into our atmosphere and children and parents will get more exercise. There are financial benefits too. It’s estimated an average family can save £642 a year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling. [iii]

Regular walking, jogging and cycling can help guard against asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers.[iv]

Alice Bailey communications and campaigns adviser for Brake, the road safety charity, said: Walking to school, which was once so common place, seems to be the second option for most parents nowadays. We need walking to school to become the norm once again and events such as Walk to School Week and next month’s Brake’s Giant Walk can hopefully showcase the benefits of an active start to the day rather than jumping in the car.

Joe Irvin, Living Streets’ CEO said: “Not only are we experiencing a childhood obesity crisis, we’re also facing a rise in mental health and wellbeing problems. We know that keeping active is a major part of the solution.
“We must prioritise ways of encouraging physical activity if we want today’s children to become healthy adults. The walk to school is a free, easy and accessible way for parents and their children to achieve this. Sadly, just 46 per centof primary school children walk to school compared to 70 per cent of their parents’ generation. We must reverse this decline.”Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics (2011)

[i] Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics (2011)
[ii] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2013
[iii] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station (June 2014)
[iv] NHS http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx (2015)

Notes to Editors:

About Brake’s Giant Walk
Brake’s Giant Walk is an annual event in primary schools where children learn about traffic pollution and danger, and transport choices. Schools taking part get their pupils to walk (in a crocodile of supervised kids, holding hands on safe pavements, or around the school’s grounds) which gives children a voice, helping them tell drivers to slow down and look out for people on foot. Children can be sponsored to take part and schools can run fundraising events, helping fund Brake's campaigns and services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes.

About Walk to School Week

Walk to School Week 2016 will take place 16-20 May. For more information visit https://www.livingstreets.org.uk/what-we-do/projects/walk-to-school-week

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

Brake comments on new report that reveals road crashes are leading killer of children globally.

News from Brake
Friday 7 December
 
A new report published today by the World Health Organisation has revealed that road crashes are the leading killer of children and young adults (aged 5-29 years) globally.  The report on the global status of road safety also found that the total number of deaths from road crashes rose to 1.35million in 2016, up from 1.25million in 2013. Road crashes are now the eighth leading cause of death globally, surpassing HIV/AIDS and TB.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, the road safety charity, said:
 
“It is truly heart breaking that so many young lives are needlessly lost across the World in road crashes. Road deaths are entirely preventable tragedies and the solutions to tackle this carnage on our roads are with us today. Governments across the World need to act now to pass life-saving laws and invest comparatively small amounts of money in road safety compared with the enormous cost of loss of life.
 
“Every hour, 154 people are killed on the world’s roads. If a plane fell out of the sky every hour killing that many people, then all planes would be grounded immediately. The time for change to tackle this epidemic on the World’s roads is now and it needs to come from the top. The United Nations must lead the way, and governments must act.”
 
ENDS
 
Notes to editors:
  • Brake is a member of the UN Road Safety Collaboration - an informal consultative mechanism whose members are committed to road safety efforts and in particular to the implementation of the recommendations of the World report on road traffic injury prevention. The goal of the Collaboration is to facilitate international cooperation and to strengthen global and regional coordination among UN agencies and other international partners to implement UN General Assembly resolutions and the recommendations of the world report thereby supporting country programmes.
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across East of England is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the East of England every five minutes
  • Two in five (38%) primary school children in the East of England have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen daily on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. In the East of England region, 178 people were killed and 2,191 seriously injured last year.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, companies and communities will be raising awareness and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 98,084 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the East of England in 2013 – one every five minutes. 96,116 were for speeding and 1,968 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of 400 primary school children in the East region[4], released today, show:

  • three in five (63%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • two in five (38%) have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.” 

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0.These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 358 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the East of England participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 63% said yes, 37% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 38% said yes, 62% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across UK is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Note: this is the national version of this release. Click here for versions specific to your region or specialist audience.

  • Two fixed penalties for 'careless driving' or speeding issued every minute
  • Two in five (41%) UK primary school children say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen every day on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which police across the country will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of UK drivers senselessly risking lives by flouting traffic laws. Almost one million fixed penalty notices were issued for 'careless driving' and speeding offences in 2013 –almost two a minute. 950,505 were for speeding and 17,483 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by region and postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas [3].

This lack of patience and consideration towards other road users can and does result in tragedy (see case studies below). It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake's survey of 5,000 primary school children [4], released today, show:

  • two thirds (67%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • two in five (41%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

That's why Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect people on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for the look out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don't look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That's why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we're asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we're all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes."

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers' national lead for roads policing, added: "Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake's week."

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying: "Britain has some of the safest roads in the world and improving safety is an absolute priority for this government. Cycling and walking are both great exercise and benefit our environment and economy, and I want more people to feel safe on our roads.

"This is why we have made significant investments in road safety and improved education resources for schools, made it easier for councils to introduce 20mph zones and increased fixed penalties for driving offences."

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented: "A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says: "Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, 'look out for each other'. But 'looking out for each other' isn't just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it's about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road."

Facts and advice:

'Vulnerable road users' (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders) account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver's speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can't, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates [7], and drivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash [8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won't notice a difference in your journey time. You'll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it's safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it's a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer [13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error [14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, at www.brake.org.uk/pledge

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Week here.
Iris Yee and Gary Igoea will be at the national launch and available for interview. Caroline MacIntyre will be at the Edinburgh launch and is available for pre-recorded interviews.

Lidia Zoetemelk, 42, from London, was travelling to work on her 50cc scooter in south east London when she was hit by a turning truck. She was killed instantly. Find out more.

Lidia's partner, Iris Yee, says: "Lidia's death was a shock to everyone who knew her. To have someone so young, with such a vibrant zest and energy for life, die so tragically and unexpectedly, has been devastating. My world collapsed when she was killed. We were on the brink of starting the next chapter of our lives. We had so much to look forward to, with so many exciting plans and dreams. I have no anger towards the driver of the vehicle for what happened, but I do want to help prevent more tragedies. Lidia often commuted to work by moped or bicycle. She was one of many vulnerable road users. This is why I'm supporting Road Safety Week. More has to be done to prevent deaths like Lidia's, especially improving visibility for drivers of large vehicles, and persuading all drivers to slow down and keep careful look out for people on foot and bike. We all have a responsibility to look out for each other, especially the most vulnerable road users.''

 


Jason MacIntyre, 34, from Fort William, was a well-known Scottish racing cyclist. He was hit by a van while on his bike on 15 January 2008 and died on the way to hospital. Find out more.

Caroline MacIntyre, Jason's wife, says: "The crash has had a catastrophic impact on our lives; it is with us on a daily basis, not only for me, but for our daughters. It has been seven years since the crash and it never gets easier. I'm not sure it's fully sunk in for any of us yet. As an up and coming cycling star he had lots of supporters who were also devastated. He was the most incredible husband and father throughout the difficulties we had with our daughter Morgan being in intensive care, and he put his family above anything. It is devastating for me to be bringing up our children without their father. It takes just a few moments to double check for vulnerable road users like Jason on his bike, and a moment of impatience can cost someone their life. Is that something you can live with on your conscience? So my message to drivers is please, slow down and take your time to look out for people – don't risk destroying lives.''

 


Timothy Igoea, 44, from Heighington, Lincolnshire, was crossing the road on a spring day when he was hit on the back of the head by a van wing mirror. He subsequently died in hospital. Find out more.

Timothy's brother, Gary Igoea, lives in Lincoln. He says: "Tim's death affected everybody in so many different ways. He was a truly special man; there are not many people you will meet in life like him. There was a strength about him that would dumbfound anyone, especially after his first crash; he almost pushed his disabilities to one side in his determination. I am so proud to have had a brother like Tim – when most people would have crumbled, he stayed strong. He had an incredible passion for life and he was taken from us and his family too early. That's why, this Road Safety Week, I want to tell people that when you get into a car, it's like holding a loaded gun: you have the power to destroy both the life of the victim and the lives of their family and friends. So please, look out for each other, don't be complacent, and be courteous on the road."

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/ 

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 4,787 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools across the UK participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 67% said yes, 33% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 41% said yes, 59% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake partners with national fire and police chief councils on new road safety competition for schools

News from Brake

22 March 2017 
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has launched a brand new project for primary schools to help children spread important road safety messages in their community.

Brake’s road safety poster competition, sponsored by Co-op Insurance, is a fun, new project that aims to inspire and engage children, aged 4-11, about the need for drivers to slow down so kids can walk and cycle to school safely.

The competition, supported by the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) and National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), will see winning designs from two age categories (4-7, and 7-11) turned into professional banners that will go on display outside schools or in the local community. Children can also win prizes worth hundreds of pounds for themselves and their school.

To help emergency service professionals inspire pupils, Brake has produced a series of free resources, including assembly and workshop presentations that they can deliver to either the whole school or a single class on a day of their choice. Children can then create a poster about the dangers of adults speeding - something that puts kids' lives at risk every single day.

The theme of the competition coincides with the fourth UN Global Road Safety Week (8-11 May), which focusses on speed and what can be done to address this key risk factor for road traffic deaths and injuries. Speed contributes to around one-third of road deaths in high-income countries, and up to half in low- and middle-income countries.

Schools also have the opportunity to fundraise for Brake by holding a Wear Your Stripes Day. Inspired by the charity’s mascot Zak the Zebra, children and staff can dress in striped clothing in exchange for money to the charity that supports bereaved and seriously injured road crash victims.

The competition can be run on a day of the school’s choice, but entries need to be submitted to Brake by Friday 30 June 2017.

For more information and to register your school visit www.brake.org.uk/postercomp

Dave Nichols, community engagement manager for Brake, the road safety charity, said: “This is a fantastic opportunity for schools, children and parents to work together to help raise awareness about the dangers of speeding in their local community. At Brake, we recognise there is a significant need to help children deepen their knowledge about road safety, and teachers want to deliver lessons that they know will help. We’re sure our new resources and competition will inspire the next generation to be both creative and passionate about getting adults to protect all of us when using roads. I would encourage any school that works with children aged 4-11 to enter, and we look forward to seeing their designs.”

James Hillon, Director of Products at Co-op Insurance said: “At Co-op Insurance we want to support local communities in educating people of all ages on the importance of road safety. If done right, this could lead the way in improving road safety and make UK roads safer for years to come. We're really happy to be supporting Brake on such a worthwhile cause to get the message out to primary school children.”

Sean Bone-Knell, National Fire Chiefs Council Road Safety Lead, said: “The National Fire Chiefs Council is pleased to be working with children and parents across the country to highlight the issues of speeding and the impact this can have on people’s lives. Children are our future; and if we can help them understand the basics of road safety at an early age, we are hopeful this will help them stay safe on and around our roads.”

Chief Constable Anthony Bangham, National Police Chiefs’ Council Lead for Roads Policing, said: “Speeding is a significant factor in an unacceptable number of road collisions. Education is absolutely critical to improving the way people drive and so we are pleased to support this initiative. Parents and young people themselves need to understand the risks associated with excessive speeding. The earlier this conversation begins, the safer our roads can be for future generations.”

***Images available on request by emailing news@brake.org.uk***


[ENDS]

Notes to Editors:

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths, serious injuries and pollution occurring on our roads every day. We work to make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake's vision is a world where there are zero road deaths and injuries, and people can get around in ways that are safe, sustainable, healthy and fair. We do this by pushing for legislative change through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. 

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Co-op Insurance

Co-op Insurance is a UK-based general insurer that operates principally within the personal lines segments of the motor and home insurance markets. The Co op Insurance underwrites the majority of business written, supplemented with some small lines of business where The Co op Insurance acts as a distributor or has a 100% reinsurance arrangement in place.

With more than 1.18m customers, The Co op Insurance is committed to ‘Doing the Right Thing’ and always strives to treat customers and members fairly. The Co op Insurance pioneered the way in lowering the insurance premiums of young drivers as the first major insurer to launch a pay how you drive telematics insurance product for young drivers in 2011. Since launching the scheme, The Co op Insurance has saved its young drivers more than £7.2 million in their first year of driving.

About NFCC

The National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) provides clear, professional leadership while representing the wider sector on matters such as professional standards, operational guidance, research and sharing best practice. The NFCC also leads and delivers key national workstreams through its Coordination Committees and aims to drive improvement and development across UK Fire and Rescue Services, while supporting strong leadership.

About NPCC

The NPCC brings police forces in the UK together to help policing coordinate operations, reform, improve and provide value for money. Some of the biggest threats to public safety are national and international. We have a collective strength by coordinating the operational response across forces. Crime is changing and so are citizens’ needs and expectations of policing. We’re constantly adapting and reforming to keep people safe. Public confidence and support is essential. We're always striving to improve the way we work and learn from when things go wrong to build people's confidence in us. It’s more important than ever that our service is efficient and effective, providing best value for money.

Brake welcomes target to halve road casualties as 23,000 kids across London walk for road safety

Wednesday 10 June 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Brake, the road safety charity, has welcomed the target announced by Mayor of London Boris Johnson yesterday (9 June 2015) to halve road casualties in London by 2020. This would mean preventing more than 14,000 deaths and serious injuries in the next five years. This comes as 23,000 children across London are taking part in Brake’s Giant Walk, calling for safer streets to walk and cycle.

Brake particularly welcomed Transport for London’s (TfL) ‘vision zero’ approach, with an ultimate ambition of eradicating deaths and serious injuries on London’s roads completely, alongside their focus on protecting the most vulnerable road users including pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“The setting of this target for London is an important step towards eradicating needless tragedies on our roads, every one of which has a ripple effect of terrible suffering and trauma. Casualty reduction targets are proven to be effective in driving progress in preventing road deaths and serious injuries, which is why it was so disappointing that the last government abandoned them on a national level. We would like to see all levels of government, from local councils to Westminster, following London’s lead.

“It is especially encouraging that TfL has made a commitment to protect the most vulnerable road users – pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists – the victims of the majority of serious and fatal collisions in London. It’s a major step forward for them to buy into a ‘vision zero’ ambition for a future entirely free of road death and serious injury. Increasingly, it is becoming recognised that all road casualties are preventable; they’re not inevitable chance ‘accidents’. We would like to see London setting even more challenging targets to achieve this, and all levels of government signing up to a ‘vision zero’.”

Brake works for a future completely free the preventable trauma of deaths and serious injuries on our roads. Find out more atwww.brake.org.uk.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog. Follow Julie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake's Giant Walk 2015 - what happened

On 10 June 2015 tens of thousands of children from hundreds of primary schools across the UK walked for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that in the UK every day four children are seriously hurt or killed while walking.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2015 did on the day, and see more pictures on our facebook page.

E Little Plumstead Primary School 2Little Plumstead Primary School in Norfolkhad a whole school assembly where they learned about car stopping distances and some road safety basics, before setting off on their Giant Walk. Older children paired up with the younger ones to walk through the streets around the school, and parents stayed to watch the very long crocodile of children carrying banners they had made at home. Over 200 children took part, and raised an amazing £507.50 on the day.

 

Ripley Junior School in Derbyshire had aEM Ripley Junior School 2 great afternoon of activities which included road safety talks in class, before hitting the streets with local police and parents also getting involved. They managed to raise a fantastic£668.03 to support Brake’s campaigns for safer roads and to support bereaved and injured victims of road crashes.

 

 

NE Barmston Village School 1 resizedBarmston Village Primary School in Sunderland incorporated their Giant Walk into their Health and Safety Week activities, where they learned how to keep themselves safe through road safety talks in class, and roleplaying in the playground. Children dressed as police officers and directed the others on bikes and scooters around road crossings drawn on the playground, baked traffic light biscuits, and drew pictures of all the fun things they had done to take home.

 

NW Trinity St Peters 2 resized250 children from Trinity St Peter's in Merseyside raised a brilliant £341.59, using their Giant Walk to initiate aparking pledge with the local community: allowing parents to park on unoccupied driveways. Alongside the walk and road safety talks in class, the children created and displayed a massive banner highlighting the importance of road safety outside their school.

SperrinviewSperrinview Special School in County Tyrone invited their local police officer to speak to children about the importance of road safety, who then escorted them on their Giant Walk. The school is on an extremely busy road, with many drivers going at 40mph, so the children made and carried posters encouraging them to GO20. The school also raised a fantastic £338 for Brake alongside their walk.

 

Aboyne Primary School in Aberdeenshire were the top fundraisers this year, raising an amazing £1296.34. They made banners to take on their Giant Walk, and calledfor safer roads in their community and around the school grounds when dropping off and collecting children.

SE Gresham Primary School 1Parents, volunteers and staff joined 240 children atGresham Primary School in Croydon for aRoad Safety afternoon packed with fun activities, including the local road safety officers from the council joining the children for an assembly. After roleplaying on road crossings they drew on the playground, the children headed out for their Giant Walk, chanting slogans and rhymes, and raising £65.30.

 

 

 

Children of all ages at Woolacombe School in Devon got involved in classroom activities before the Giant Walk, from Year 6 studying graphs in maths lessons, to Year 4 making road safety leaflets to share with the younger children. The older children also joined thePolice Liaison Officer for a speed workshop, using a speed gun outside the school to stop speeding drivers. Younger children made placards and banners for the walk, and the school raised £94.60 on a 'Wear Something Bright' day.

WM St Brigids Catholic Primary School 3 resizedSt Brigid's Catholic Primary School in Birmingham used their Giant Walk as an opportunity to involve the whole school community in the School Council's ongoing campaign for a reduced speed limit outside the school. Before the walk, the school councillors conducted a road safety survey and collected signatures on a petition to enforce a 20mph speed limit. They also held a protest which was supported by local councillor Steve Booton, and representatives from their MP Richard Burden's office. On the day of their Giant Walk, the children made banners and posters to carry, and were joined by their local community police officer, and raised a brilliant £430.14.

Shortbrook Primary School in Sheffield invited parents to join their children on a walk to the local park, where they hada huge family picnic. The fantastic event got the whole school involved, with children from nursery to Year 6 joining the Giant Walk, and raised an amazing £806.83 for Brake.

Brake's Giant Walk 2016 - what happened

On 15 June 2016 over 25,000 children from schools across the UK walked for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that in the UK every day four children are seriously hurt or killed while walking.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2016 did on the day, see more pictures on our facebook page and follow @Brakecharity and use #BrakesGiantWalk on Twitter!

Read our full report on Brake's Giant Walk 2016

 

 

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The children at St John the Baptist C of E Primary School in Penistone had lots of fun showing off their posters as they walked around the local village. A local councillor and staff from their local Tesco store also joined them, encouraging drivers to slow down and supporting their message of not driving to school. Check them out in action in our 2016 video.

 

  

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Pupils and parents from St John’s C of E Primary School in Harrow, London, joined forces to campaign for safer roads in their community. The children made their own placards and raised awareness in their local community, encouraging drivers to slow down. Teachers said they found it a really positive experience, bringing the school communities together to help raise awareness of road safety. Fantastically, alongside all of their hard work they raised more than £1000 for Brake!

 

 

 

  

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Brake’s mascot Zak the Zebra joined more than 300 children from Neilston Primary School in Scotland. They learned about how to be safe on their walk before meeting up with another school and holding a mini road show. A local police officer talked about the importance of road safety and school principal teacher Jane McDermott said “Watching the children out in the village gives a great feeling of togetherness and community as well as promoting the importance of road safety.

 

 

giantwalk dunstableAt St Augustine’s Academy, Bedfordshire, in partnership with Dunstable Town Council, the children played road safety games and discussed how to be safe when crossing the road. They then created their own posters and used these, along with Brake’s, to take to the streets during a long two-mile walk to raise awareness of road safety in their local community. The children enjoyed using their posters to communicate important messages about slowing down to drivers and the young people who participated on the walk continued to learn about road safety at Junior Wardens - an after school programme.

  

 

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Lots of laughs and fun was had at the 11th Walsall Rainbows in West Midlands. The girls really enjoyed learning about road safety all term and completed their road safety badge. They also made posters which they showed their parents and told them the importance of being safe on the roads. They loved getting their stickers for completing the walk and found the resources really informative.

  

 

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River Beach Primary School didn’t let the soggy weather dampen their walk as they met in the morning and all walked to school together, campaigning for drivers to slow down. They were met at the school gates by their teachers, congratulating them on their walk before dispersing into class to continue their school day.

 

 

 

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400 children took part at Carnmoney Primary School in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, who managed to raise a wonderful £381.60! Alongside their walk around the community where they campaigned for safer roads, they held different road safety activities within class. They also had a poster colouring competition and the winner got theirs made into a placard to carry on their walk!

 

 

 

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Barmston Village School went on their walk outside of their school gates so that the local community in Durham could notice them. They took their ‘slow down’ banners, having lots of fun spreading the message of being safe around roads. In class they made their own posters on the different issues surrounding road safety and the importance of drivers slowing down on their roads.

 

 

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In Liverpool, over 1000 children took part in road safety activities which emphasised the importance of St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Infant and Junior School’s Giant Walk. School Council Representatives met and discussed ideas to raise awareness of road safety prior to the event. A competition was launched to design the best road safety poster; these posters were used on the day to encourage drivers in their community to slow down. The children also had lots of fun chanting and making their voices heard. They even had their parents out campaigning while they stood opposite the school with their own posters and banners and invited families to complete a ‘Family Road Safety Pledge’ to show how everyone works together to ensure their children’s safety.

 

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Red Oaks Primary School in Wiltshire took what they’d learnt throughout the year on road safety and incorporated it into their walk. Alongside their lessons on road safety and discussion on how to be safe and be seen in assembly, they took to the streets to tell drivers to slow down. They also raised £209.92 to help continue Brake’s work.

 

 

 

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Local police officers visited Gayton Junior School in Derby on their Giant Walk to help their 360 children cross the road. The children’s parents also joined in, helping to raise awareness of the importance of slowing down. In preparation for their walk, the children made informative posters and discussed road safety in class. They raised a fantastic £115.15 for Brake!

Brake's Kids Walk

kids walk web

Brake’s Kids Walk, previously known as Brake's Giant Walk and Walking Bus, is back!

On Wednesday 12 June 2019, more than 100,000 children, aged 4-11, will put their best feet forward to promote road safety and the health and planet-saving benefits of walking. Supervised walks will take place at or around schools and nurseries, with children walking in a crocodile formation and holding hands to promote the importance of kids being able to walk without fear or threat from traffic.

 

ALL KW STUFF

Everyone who registers will receive a free action* pack full of posters, banners, lesson plans, assembly presentations and activities.
We also have resources translated into the Welsh language.

*Pack subject to change.
  

Kids walk register button

 

Global 5 calls to safer roads imageLike you, Brake is passionate about the safety and welfare of children. We believe it's every child's right to be able to walk in their communities without fear of traffic and pollution. But to do this, we need to make sure their journeys to school, home and shops are safe. This project aims to inspire and engage children about the dangers they face and help Brake call on grown ups to make their streets safer. We can do this by having footpaths, cycle paths, safe places to cross, slow traffic and clean traffic. We believe these 5 messages are important so we can stop the 5 children who are being killed or hurt on our roads every single day!

WYSD

 

Brake's Kids Walk also provides a fantastic opportunity to raise valuable funds for Brake. Take a look at Zak's fundraising page for lots of fun ideas on how your school can get involved. From running a Wear Your Stripes Day to baking delicious treats to sell to parents.

You could also run your Kids Walk as a sponsored walk using the sponsorship form in the action pack.

If you aren't able to fundraise, a donation to cover the cost of your resources would be greatly appreciated.

As a charity we rely heavily on fundraising and donations to aid our work in supporting road crash victims and campaigning for safer roads.

 

Do you know anyone else who would like to take part? Share our marketing flyer with them!
Need it in Welsh? View our Welsh flyer.

For more information email kidswalk@brake.org.uk, call the team on 01484 550061, or check out our teaching road safety guide.

 

If you would like to receive information about other opportunities and events please sign up at our preference centre

 

Find out what primary schools have done before:

 

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