Articles Tagged ‘clock change - Brake the road safety charity’

Britain still in the dark as charity renews call to make the most of daylight and make roads safer

Friday 27 March 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

As the clocks spring forward this Sunday, politicians are being reminded that the way Britain sets its clocks is wasting hours of potentially productive daylight and creating unnecessary risk on our roads. Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on all political parties to commit to putting the clocks forward an hour year round, a move which would make the most of available daylight, and bring about lighter afternoons and evenings, and therefore safer streets, in the winter months.

With more people travelling in daylight rather than darkness, road journeys would become safer for all, especially vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists. It has been estimated that moving the clocks to GMT +1 in winter and GMT +2 in summer would prevent 80 deaths and hundreds of serious injuries on UK roads every year [1], preventing needless suffering and saving the NHS £138 million a year in the process [2].

Lighter, safer evenings could also encourage more recreational walking and cycling. Combined with Brake’s GO 20 campaign for 20mph limits in cities, towns and villages, this would mean a powerful boost for healthy, active lifestyles. Brake is reminding that at all times of year by slowing down to 20mph in built up areas, drivers can make a personal contribution to making roads safer for those on foot and bike.

Find out more about theLighter Later andGO 20 campaigns to make roads safer for people on foot and bike.Tweet us:@Brakecharity, hashtag #LighterLater.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, the road safety charity, said:“Putting the clocks forward by an hour year-round is a simple move that would have a wide range of benefits for society, including helping to cut devastating road casualties. With more daylight available in the afternoons and evenings, people would be safer and feel more confident getting out and about on foot or bike, whether to get back from school or work or for recreation. Our communities would be more social, enjoyable places. As British summertime gets underway, we’re calling on whoever forms the next government to waste no time, and implement these changes.”

About the Lighter Later campaign

Brake is part of a coalition of organisations campaigning for the clocks to go forward for an hour year round, making it GMT +1 in winter and GMT +2 in summer. This simple change would make our evenings lighter and give us more daylight during waking hours. It's estimated this would result in 80 fewer road deaths and hundreds fewer serious injuries each year [3], preventing unnecessary suffering and saving the NHS £138million annually [4].

It would also cut 447,000 tonnes of CO2 pollution [5], and save us all on our bills, because we would have to put our lights on less. Not to mention a big boost to leisure, tourism, and healthy life-styles because we get a bit more daylight to play with. Find out more at www.lighterlater.org.

In January 2012, despite widespread support from the Lighter Later coalition, MPs, and letters from 26,300 members of the public, a Daylight Saving Bill which would have compelled the government to review and act on the evidence for changing the clocks, ran out of time in the House of Commons, preventing more than 140 MPs who had stayed to vote from doing so.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on Twitter or Facebook. Follow Julie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Report 368, a new assessment of the likely effects on road accidents of adopting a GMT+1/GMT+2 regime, Transport Research Laboratory, 1998
[2] Department for Transport, A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain’s Roads the Safest in the World, 2009
[3] Report 368, a new assessment of the likely effects on road accidents of adopting a GMT+1/GMT+2 regime, Transport Research Laboratory, 1998
[4] Department for Transport, A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain’s Roads the Safest in the World, 2009
[5] Chong, Y. Garnsey, E. Hill, S. & Desobry, F. Daylight Saving, Electricity Demand and Emissions; Exploratory Studies from Great Britain, 2009http://www.ifm.eng.cam.ac.uk/people/ewg/091022_dst.pdf

Changing the clocks

The way the clocks are set in the UK means for much of the year, most of us waste daylight in the early mornings while we're asleep, and then have to make our way home in the dark in the evening.

In the UK, clocks follow Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) from October to March, and British Summer Time (BST), which is GMT + 1, from March to October. This means Britain is out of step with most European countries, which follow Central European Time (CET), which is always one hour ahead of the UK. It also means that in winter, it gets dark as early as 3.30pm in some parts of the UK [1].

Why are darker evenings dangerous?

During the week, casualty rates peak between 5pm-6pm for adults, and 3.30pm-4.30pm for children. There is another peak in the morning, 8-9am, but the afternoon peak is higher for all ages [2]. These times coincide with the morning and evening rush hours and school runs, which are already dangerous due to the volume of traffic, and even more so in the winter months when the evening journeys are made in the dark.

Road casualty rates increase with the arrival of darker evenings and poor weather. For example, in 2013 there were more than twice as many pedestrian deaths in December as in June [3]. It has been observed that each year from when the clocks go back in October, the peak in evening road casualties shifts so it falls in the hour after sunset [4]. Research has also found that serious and fatal pedestrian collisions increase 10% in the four weeks after the clocks go back [5].

There are several reasons for the increase in casualties in the darker winter evenings. First, pedestrians and cyclists, road signs, and other road users are simply harder to spot. Drivers also tend to be more tired after a day’s work, so concentration levels are lower in the evenings than in the mornings [6]. Finally, both children and adults tend to make social or leisure trips in the evening [7] (such as visiting friends, or children taking part in after-school activities), so in winter have to make these journeys after dark.

Take action: Make the Brake Pledge to minimise the amount you drive, or not drive at all, and get about by walking, cycling or public transport as much as possible, for road safety, the environment and your health.

How should the clocks be changed?

Brake is calling for the UK to change to Single/Double British Summertime (SDST), adjusting the clocks to GMT+1 in the winter, and GMT+2 in the summer. This would result in darker mornings but an extra hour of evening daylight throughout the year.

It is estimated this would prevent 80 deaths and more than 200 serious injuries on UK roads every year. The initial, one-off cost of making and publicising the change is estimated at about £5 million, which would be more than offset by the benefits of the change, amounting to £138 million per year [8]. Analysis has projected a net benefit of £2.5 billion over 20 years, from reduced casualties [9].

As well as reducing casualties, SDST would deliver a range of other benefits, to the environment, health and tourism:

  • Environment: switching to SDST would reduce CO2 pollution by at least 447,000 tonnes each year, due to reduced electricity demand for artificial light in the evenings [10].
  • Health: Longer evenings would encourage more people to be active, using the extra daylight hours for outdoor leisure and sporting activity [11]. Daylight is also known to reduce depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) [12].
  • Tourism: SDLT would allow an extended tourism season and longer summer opening hours of tourist facilities, boosting the UK tourism industry by £1bn every year [13].

Previous trials

From 1968 to 1971, the UK ran an experiment in which British Summer Time (GMT+1) was employed all year round. The clocks were put forward as usual in March 1968 and not put back until October 1971. 

Analysis of crash data [14] during this period showed that keeping BST during the winter months resulted in an 11% reduction in casualties in England and Wales during the hours affected by the time change. In Scotland, there was a 17% reduction in casualties. Although casualties in the morning increased slightly, the decrease in casualties in the evening more than outweighed this.

Overall, about 2,500 fewer people were killed or seriously injured during the first two winters of the experiment. The experiment coincided with the introduction of roadside breath tests and the 70mph speed limit, which may have also had an impact on the casualty reduction figures.

Despite the reduction in casualties, continuation of BST past the trial period was blocked by a vote in the House of Commons. The opposition was due to the small rise in early morning casualties (despite these being outweighed by the huge reduction in evening casualties), and concern over disruption to early-morning workers such as farmers and postal workers.

In 1989, researchers analysed casualty data from winter 1969/70, in the middle of the experimental period, and concluded that BST had resulted in 232 fewer deaths and serious injuries and 2,342 fewer overall casualties during that one winter, taking into account wider trends and other road safety factors like roadside breath testing. The study concluded that BST was effective in reducing casualties, particularly among children, pedestrians, and people in central England and southern Scotland [15].

Why not change to SDST?

In previous years, a move to SDST has been opposed on the grounds that it would disrupt industries that operate in the early hours of the morning, such as farming, milk delivery, and postal workers. However, there is increasing evidence that these objections are less relevant. For example, post deliveries now take place later in the day than when the 1968/71 experiment took place, and are usually staggered throughout the day [16]. Modern farming methods have reduced the impact on farmers, with many (including the National Farmers’ Union for Scotland [17], who previously opposed the change) now neutral or positive about a move to SDST.

There has also been opposition to the change from Scotland, due to a mistaken impression from misleading reports that the 1968/71 experiment increased casualties, and a perception that the change would only benefit England. This is untrue: the reduction in casualties during the 1968/71 experiment was greater in Scotland than in England and Wales. Due to its shorter daylight hours to begin with, Scotland would benefit disproportionately in safety, economic, health and all other measurable areas compared with England and Wales [18].


[1] Sunrise/set times for the United Kingdom, HM Nautical Almanac Office, 2014

[2] Single Double British Summertime Factsheet, RoSPA, 2013

[3] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014, table RAS30020

[4] Daylight hours, Road Safety Observatory, 2012

[5] Improving Road Safety for Pedestrians and Cyclists in Great Britain, National Audit Office, 2009

[6] Fatigue and Road Safety: A Critical Analysis of Recent Evidence, Department for Transport, 2011

[7] Single Double British Summertime Factsheet, RoSPA, 2013

[8] A Safer Way: Making Britain’s Roads the Safest in the World, Department for Transport consultation paper, 2009

[9] Policy briefing – single/double summertime, Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety, 2010

[10] Daylight saving, electricity demand and emissions: the British Case. In: The Future of Electricity Demand, Customers, Citizens and Loads, Cambridge University Press, 2011

[11] Daylight Saving Survey, YouGov, 2009

[12] Single Double British Summertime Factsheet, RoSPA, 2013

[13] The likely impact on tourist activity in the UK of the adoption of DST, Policy Studies Institute, 2008

[14] Review of British Standard Time, Home Office, 1970

[15] The potential effects on road casualties of Double British Summer Time, Transport Research Laboratory, 1989

[16] Why do I receive my mail at different times? Royal Mail, undated

[17] “We're not against moving clocks forward an hour, say Scottish farmers, The Guardian, 2010

[18] Single Double British Summertime Factsheet, RoSPA, 2013


Page last updated: September 2014

Darker evenings spell danger for road safety

News from Brake
Thursday 25 October 2018
 
With the end of British Summer Time (BST) bringing in darker evenings, Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the Government to commit to moving to Single/Double Summer Time (SDST) to help save lives on the road. 
 
SDST would move our clocks forward an additional hour all year round and so would create lighter evenings, allowing many road users, especially cyclists and pedestrians, to take advantage of the benefits of natural light to remain safe and be seen during evening rush hours. Lighter winter evenings could also have life-saving implications - the number of pedestrians killed jumped from 46 in October 2017 to 63 in November 2017, the first month after the clocks went back, a consistent trend over recent years [1]. 
 
Studies have found that moving the clocks to an hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT+1) in winter, and two hours ahead (GMT+2) in summer, would prevent 80 deaths and hundreds of serious injuries on UK roads every year [2,3]. There are also significant environmental benefits to be gained from implementing SDST as it has been estimated that the switch would reduce CO2 pollution by up to 447,000 tonnes each year [4].
 
Commenting Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
“With summer time ending, and the nights closing in, the danger facing cyclists and pedestrians on our roads increases. At a time when the UK is struggling to move the dial on road safety, a move to SDST offers a glaringly simple and effective way to reduce deaths and injuries on our roads and so must be considered seriously by the Government. Lighter evenings can bring so many benefits, not only to road safety but through reducing carbon emissions and encouraging more people to be active and use the extra daylight for outdoor leisure activity – it really is a win-win for the Government.”
 
ENDS
 
Notes to editors:
 
[4] Yu-Foong Chong, Elizabeth Garnsey, Simon Hill and Frederic Desobry “Daylight Saving, Electricity Demand and Emissions; Exploratory Studies from Great Britain”, October 2009
 
About Brake
 
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on Twitter, Facebook, or The Brake Blog.
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

David Kidney, MP for Stafford, February 2007

feb07David Kidney, MP for Stafford

David Kidney has sponsored and supported a Private Members Bill calling for time to be advanced for one hour throughout the year to create lighter evenings. He has spoken at length about the benefits of introducing such a bill, particularly on the probability of road casualties being reduced if time were advanced and evenings made lighter. Click here to read the Second Reading of the bill. He has also campaigned for action to ensure safer driving for work, and has tabled two written questions on the issue. Click here and here to read these questions and the Government’s response.

David Kidney says: ‘Putting the clocks forward by one hour has the potential to save about 130 lives a year?the equivalent of an average-sized primary school in my constituency? by making evenings lighter. Since we stopped the British Summer Time experiment in 1971, more than 3,000 lives have been lost on the roads that might not have been lost had we carried on with the experiment. I believe it is time to take the simple step of advancing time by one hour in order to make the roads safer for vulnerable road users in the evenings.’

Click here to read Brake’s fact sheet Time to put the clocks forward’.

Go bright and go 20, says charity, to prevent road casualties as evenings get darker

Friday 24 October 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

As the clocks go back this Sunday, people on foot and bike become more vulnerable on our roads, as afternoons become darker and they are harder for drivers to spot. The charity Brake, in partnership with Autoglass, is calling on drivers to slow down and take extra care to prevent casualties, and inviting community groups and organisations to take part in its Bright Day initiative to raise awareness.

Last year in the UK 518 people were killed and 8,345 seriously injured while walking and cycling [1], and the risks are heightened on dark winter evenings. Drivers can do their bit to protect people on foot or bike by pledging to slow down to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops, giving themselves a far better chance of stopping in time in an emergency, such as if a child steps out from the darkness unexpectedly. Find more driver advice at www.brake.org.uk/driveradvice and read about Brake's GO 20 campaign www.brake.org.uk/go20

Schools, community groups, organisations, and anyone passionate about walking and cycling are encouraged to sign up now to run a Bright Day during Road Safety Week (17-23 November). Bright Days are fun dress down days where everyone wears their brightest clothes to raise awareness of the risks faced by people on foot and bike and the importance of drivers slowing down and looking out. They raise funds for Brake's work caring for people bereaved and injured in road crashes and campaigning for safer roads.

Last year, hundreds of groups and organisations took part in the Bright Day initiative, raising almost £12,000 to support Brake's work. For instance, junior road safety officers at Bellfield and Crosshouse primary schools in Ayrshire raised £150 and £100 respectively on their Bright Days, which included classroom activities about being bright and seen and prizes for students with the brightest outfits.

To run your own Bright Day, register now for your free resource pack, including posters, flyers and donation bucket stickers, at www.brake.org.uk/brightday

The increased danger people on foot and bike are exposed to during the dark winter months could be reduced by putting the clocks forward by an hour year round, which is why Brake is part of the Lighter Later campaign, calling for this common sense change. It's estimated this would prevent 80 deaths and hundreds of serious injuries every year [2], preventing unnecessary suffering and saving the NHS £138million annually [3]. Find out more at www.brake.org.uk/lighterlater

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "As the clocks go back and afternoons get darker, people on foot and bike are more at risk, so it's a time when drivers needs to be extra vigilant – and that includes slowing down, and going 20 or below in towns and villages. It's also an ideal time for schools, organisations and community groups to help raise awareness and prevent casualties by getting involved with Brake's Bright Day initiative. Bright Days are a fun, simple way to promote vital road safety messages while raising funds to support Brake's work supporting families coping with the devastation of a death or serious injury in a road crash. Brake also continues to campaign for the government to take a positive step to stop preventable casualties by changing the clocks for good."

Neil Atherton, sales and marketing director at Autoglass, said: "Road safety and respect for pedestrians is something that we have always championed at Autoglass, so we are extremely proud to be supporting Brake's Bright Day campaign again this year. Participating in a Bright Day is a great way for organisations to raise road safety awareness and understand the importance of being seen on the roads, especially at this time of year when the clocks change. Awareness has a crucial role to play in keeping people safe on the roads, which is why we're supporting Brake's vital campaign and planning our own Bright Day to raise money and help Brake make a real difference."

Notes for editors

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Autoglass®
Autoglass® is the UK's leading vehicle glass repair and replacement service, serving close to 1.5 million drivers a year. For details of your nearest centre, call 0800 36 36 36 or visit www.autoglass.co.uk

End notes
[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014

Keep our roads lighter and brighter

News from Brake

22 March 2017 
news@brake.org.uk

As we prepare, this weekend, to turn the clocks forward and welcome the start of spring, Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the UK government to commit to moving to Single/Double Summer Time (SDST), a change that would require us to move our clocks forward an additional hour all year round.

The change would create lighter evenings all year round and would allow many road users, especially cyclists and pedestrians, to take advantage of the benefits of natural light to remain safe and be seen during the busiest hours on our roads. Travelling in daylight during the winter months could have particular life-saving implications: UK statistics show that pedestrian deaths and the vehicle casualty rate both increased during the winter months of 2015, a consistent trend over recent years [1].  

Previous studies have estimated that moving the clocks to an hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT+1) in winter, and two hours ahead (GMT+2) in summer, would prevent 80 deaths and hundreds of serious injuries on UK roads every year [2,3]. There are also significant environmental benefits to be gained from implementing SDST, it has been estimated that the switch would reduce CO2 pollution by up to 447,000 tonnes each year [4].

Introducing SDST to the UK would encourage more people to walk or cycle to and from their destination rather than travelling by car. This would be a powerful boost to the wellbeing of local communities, promoting safer, more sustainable transport and healthier lifestyles for many individuals. 

Gary Rae, campaigns director for Brake, said: “Brake has been campaigning for the clocks to be changed for good for many years. It is such a simple and effective way to reduce deaths and injuries on our roads, and carries so many other benefits, like increased daylight leisure time, and reduced carbon emissions. I want the government to look at this much neglected issue again.”

ENDS

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties. 

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016
[2] Report 368, a new assessment of the likely effects on road accidents of adopting a GMT+1/GMT+2 regime, Transport Research Laboratory, 1998 
[3] Department for Transport, A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain’s Roads the Safest in the World, 2009
[4] Yu-Foong Chong, Elizabeth Garnsey, Simon Hill and Frederic Desobry “Daylight Saving, Electricity Demand and Emissions; Exploratory Studies from Great Britain”, October 2009

Lighter later

lighter-later-logoThe way our clocks are set in the UK means for much of the year, most of us waste daylight in the early mornings while we're asleep, then have to make our way home in the dark in the evening. This creates extra problems for road safety because of the dangers faced by people on foot and bike on dark winter evenings, when they are harder for drivers to spot. By changing our clocks for good, we can prevent many needless deaths and injuries.

Get the facts on changing the clocks.

What needs to be done?

Brake is part of a coalition of organisations calling for our clocks to be put forward by an hour year-round – to GMT+2 in summer and GMT+1 in winter. This would make our evenings lighter and give us more daylight during waking hours. It would be a life saver, making vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists easier to spot in the evenings – it's estimated this would stop 80 deaths and hundreds of serious injuries every year, preventing unnecessary suffering and saving the NHS £138 million annually.

Putting the clocks forward would also have plenty of other benefits. It's predicted it would cut 447,000 tonnes of CO2 pollution, and save all of us money on our energy bills, because we would have to put our lights on less. There would also be a big boost to leisure, tourism, and healthy life-styles because we would all get that bit more daylight to play with.

What can I do?

Find out what you can do to help our other campaigns.

Campaign news

Britain still in the dark as charity renews call to make the most of daylight, 27/03/2015
Go bright and go 20, says charity, to prevent road casualties as evenings get darker, 24/10/2014
Time to change: Brake renews call to make the most of daylight hours and help save lives, 28/03/2014
Charity appeals for action to prevent pedestrian and cyclist casualties as clocks go back, 26/10/2012
Charity renews calls for clocks to be changed year-round to make roads safer, 23/03/2012
Daylight Savings Bill stalls at 3rd reading, 27/01/2012
Brake responds to consultation on Changes to Daylight Saving, 15/12/2011
Brake urges government to change clocks for good, and calls for driver vigilance, 27/10/2011
Brake calls on Government to save lives by making it Lighter Later year-round, 23/03/2011
Clocking up success! 06/12/2010

Rebecca Harris, MP for Essex Castle Point, June/July 2010

rebecca-harrisRebecca Harris, Conservative MP for Essex Castle Point, has been awarded Parliamentarian of the Month by Brake, the road safety charity, and Direct Line. In June this month, Rebecca tabled a Private Members’ Bill to get the Secretary of State to conduct an analysis of the costs and benefits of introducing daylight saving time and then act on the results.

Daylight saving time means putting the clocks forward by one hour to make the days lighter. It would make journeys home from schools much safer for children during the winter months. It’s estimated that this could save 100 lives each year on our roads, and prevent many more serious injuries. [1]

Brake has been calling for action from policy makers to bring the clocks forward for years. During the winter, darkness may come as early as 3pm in some parts of the UK, meaning drivers, pedestrians and cyclists have no option other than to travel in the dark. Pedestrians and cyclists become harder to see, which puts them at much greater risk. Each year the number of deaths and injuries on our roads increases sharply as we put the clocks back at the end of summer and the evenings become darker earlier. A simple solution, like putting the clocks forward an hour could make all the difference to children walking home from school.

Read Brake’s fact sheet ‘Time to put the clocks forward’.

The environmental campaign group 10:10 brought together charities to campaign together on this issue under the banner of the ‘Lighter Later’ campaign. They have highlighted evidence that as well as improving road safety, putting the clocks forward has the potential to significantly reduce the amount of energy we use in the winter months, cutting carbon emissions by an estimated 447,000 tonnes, [2] and offer other social and economic benefits.

Rebecca Harris MP has been a supporter of putting the clocks forward for many years so she was very excited when she heard that so many charities had grouped together to move forward the campaign. Rebecca shared the public’s concern for children travelling home from school in the dark. Rebecca has used her influence as an MP to help her constituents to campaign for road safety improvements such as pedestrian crossings in her local area. As a mother herself, she understands other parents’ justifiable fears for the safety of their children on the roads. Rebecca is also committed to cutting carbon emissions and has supported the ‘Lighter Later’ campaign as an opportunity to both improve safety and help protect the environment.

Rebecca was one of a small minority of MPs who won a ballot to put forward a Private Members’ Bill. She seized this opportunity to sponsor a bill to introduce daylight saving hours. The Daylight Saving Bill 2010-11 had its first reading on 30 June 2010. Her bill and support for the ‘Lighter Later’ campaign has already had significant media coverage, boosting public support for the campaign.

The bill is due to have its second reading on 3 December 2010 and Rebecca is working hard to make sure that supportive MPs attend the reading and help to push the bill through to the next legislative phase.

Rebecca Harris MP said:

"I am delighted to be selected as Brake’s Parliamentarian of the Month. As a mother I want Britain’s roads to be as safe as possible. I am very proud to be putting forward a bill that has the potential to help save lives on our roads, as well as help us meet our commitments to cut carbon.

I encourage all those who support the cause to contact their local MP and encourage them to attend the Second Reading of my Bill on 3rd December".

Ellen Booth, Brake’s campaigns officer, said:

"We are delighted that the campaign to get the clocks put forward is taking off following years of campaigning on this issue. This is an opportunity to make a huge difference to road safety and carbon emissions through one and we are eagerly awaiting news of the success of Rebecca’s Bill’s second reading in December. Rebecca’s firm commitment to road safety and the environment are commendable and we are very pleased to award her with our ‘Parliamentarian of the Month’ award for road safety."

Time to change: Brake renews call to make the most of daylight hours and help save lives

28 March 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

As the clocks go forward this Sunday, Brake, the road safety charity, is renewing calls for government to make roads safer by putting the clocks forward by an hour all year-round. This would mean making the most of available daylight, with lighter afternoons and evenings in the winter months, reducing danger to pedestrians and cyclists.

Moving the clocks to GMT+1 in winter and GMT+2 in summer would save an estimated 80 lives a year and prevent hundreds of serious injuries on the roads [1], preventing needless suffering and saving the NHS around £138 million a year in the process [2].

Safer, lighter evenings would also encourage more recreational walking and cycling. Combined with Brake's GO 20 campaign for 20mph limits in cities, towns and villages, this would mean a powerful boost for healthy, active lifestyles. By slowing down to 20mph in built up areas, night and day, drivers can make a personal contribution to making roads safer for those on foot and bike.

In 2012, despite widespread support from the Lighter Later coalition, MPs, and letters from 26,300 members of the public, a Daylight Saving Bill which would have compelled the government to review and act on the evidence for changing the clocks, ran out of time. Now Brake is renewing its calls for government to make this common sense change.

Find out more about the Lighter Later and GO 20 campaigns to make roads safer for people on foot and bike. Tweet us: @Brakecharity, hashtag #LighterLater.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "Putting the clocks forward by an extra hour throughout the year is a simple change that would make a huge positive difference to society, giving us all more daylight to play with. With lighter afternoons and evenings, many more people would be able to get out and walk and cycle, to get to school or work, or simply for their health and enjoyment. People on foot or bike would be easier for drivers to see, many devastating road casualties would be prevented, and our communities would be more social, enjoyable places. As British summertime gets underway, we're also appealing to drivers to make their own change to protect people on foot and bike, by slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops."

As British summertime starts, Brake is also appealing to schools, employers and community groups to support Brake's work and help raise awareness of pedestrian and cyclist safety by holding a Bright Day. These fun dress-down days promote the importance of drivers looking out for people on foot on foot and bike while raising vital funds for Brake's work supporting families devastated by road death and injury.

About the Lighter Later campaign
Brake is in a coalition of organisations campaigning for the clocks to go forward for an hour year round, making it GMT+2 in summer and GMT+1 in winter. This simple change would make our evenings lighter and give us more daylight during waking hours. It's estimated this would result in 80 fewer road deaths and hundreds fewer serious injuries each year [3], preventing unnecessary suffering and saving the NHS £138million annually [4].

It would also cut 447,000 tonnes of CO2 pollution [5], and save us all on our bills, because we would have to put our lights on less. Not to mention a big boost to leisure, tourism, and healthy life-styles because we get a bit more daylight to play with. Find out more at www.lighterlater.org.

In January 2012, the Lighter Later Bill ran out of time on the House floor, meaning MPs couldn't vote to put it through to its third reading, despite over 140 MPs staying to vote.

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes
[1] Report 368, a new assessment of the likely effects on road accidents of adopting a GMT+1/GMT+2 regime, Transport Research Laboratory, 1998
[2] Department for Transport, A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain's Roads the Safest in the World, 2009
[3] Report 368, a new assessment of the likely effects on road accidents of adopting a GMT+1/GMT+2 regime, Transport Research Laboratory, 1998
[4] Department for Transport, A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain's Roads the Safest in the World, 2009
[5] Chong, Y. Garnsey, E. Hill, S. & Desobry, F. Daylight Saving, Electricity Demand and Emissions; Exploratory Studies from Great Britain, 2009 http://www.ifm.eng.cam.ac.uk/people/ewg/091022_dst.pdf