Articles Tagged ‘Driving for Zero - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake comments on increase in drink-driving deaths and injuries

News from Brake
Thursday, 9 August 2018
 
The Department for Transport has today (Thursday 9 August) published statistics on drink drive crashes in Great Britain for 2016 [1]. This shows drink-driving deaths and injuries are at the highest level since 2012 and that there has been an estimated increase in the number of road deaths, the number of injuries, and the total number of crashes relating to at least one driver being over the alcohol limit. 
 
Commenting on the statistics, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns at road safety charity Brake, said:
“How many more lives must be needlessly lost before the Government acts on drink-driving? Today’s figures show that drink-driving is an increasing blight on British roads and yet the Government sits on its hands and refuses to address the issue. The Government should put its money where its mouth is and align the law with the message from its 'Think!’ campaign: “if you’re driving, it’s better to have none for the road”. Only this zero-tolerance approach can create the change required to rid our roads of the menace of drink-driving.”
 
“The current drink-driving limit gives a false impression that it is safe to drink and drive – this is a dangerous message and one that couldn’t be further from the truth. Research has shown even very small amounts of alcohol dramatically affect safe driving - drivers with levels of alcohol in their blood just half the current legal limit are at least twice more likely to die in a crash than those with no alcohol at all.”
 
“Our current drink-driving law lacks clarity, is badly understood and supports the perception that mixing alcohol and driving is acceptable – this needs to change. Brake is calling for the Government to implement an effective zero tolerance drink-drive limit of 20mg per 100ml of blood, making clear to drivers that not a drop of alcohol is safe.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors
 
 

Final estimates of casualties in accidents involving at least one driver or rider over the drink-drive limit in Great Britain for 2016 show that:

  • between 220 and 250 people were killed in drink-drive accidents, with a central estimate of 230 fatalities
  • the increase in drink-drive fatalities since 2015 is not statistically significant, continuing a period of stability recorded since 2010
  • an estimated 9,040 people were killed or injured in drink-drive accidents, a rise of 7% since 2015
  • the total number of drink-drive accidents rose by 6% to 6,070 in 2016
 
[2] Brake ‘Driving for zero’ campaign
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake comments on Spurs' Captain, Hugo Lloris, guilty plea to drink driving charge

News from Brake
Wednesday 12 September
 
Tottenham Hotspur Goalkeeper and Captain, Hugo Lloris, has today pleaded guilty to drink driving after being stopped by Police in West London last month.
 
The case comes only weeks after figures published by the Department for Transport showed that the number of people killed or seriously injured in drink drive crashes in 2016 is at the highest level since 2012.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
“It is disappointing to see that someone who is a role model to many thousands of football fans has admitted breaking the law by drink driving. We expect the captain of Tottenham Hotspur and his national team to be setting a good example, not flouting the law in such a manner. This kind of dangerous behaviour is selfish, illegal and puts lives at risk.”
 
“Drink driving is an increasing menace on our roads. The current limit gives a false impression that it is safe to drink and drive – it is not. It is high time that the Government takes decisive action before any more lives are needlessly lost and implements an effective zero tolerance drink-drive limit of 20mg per 100ml of blood, making clear to drivers that not a drop of alcohol is safe.”
 
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors:
About Brake
 
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake comments on Wayne Rooney's guilty drink driving plea

News from Brake
Monday, 18 September 2017
news@brake.org.uk

Wayne Rooney has this morning pleaded guilty at Stockport Magistrates' Court to a charge of drink driving. Reacting to the news, Jason Wakeford, Director of Campaigns for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Drink driving is an abhorrent crime which can end innocent lives and inflict unimaginable trauma. Public figures should be setting a positive example of safe driving behaviour.

"Any amount of alcohol seriously affects the chances of being involved in a potentially deadly crash. The drink drive limit in England and Wales is the second highest in the European Union and must be lowered to a zero-tolerance, to help reduce needless deaths and serious injury on our roads."

[ENDS]

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Driving for zero: alcohol and drugs

Despite decades of campaigns, one in eight road deaths still involves a driver over the limit. Because the UK's drink drive limit is high, there will be more, unrecorded, casualties involving drivers impaired by alcohol but under the current limit - all countries in Europe apart from Malta have a lower drink drive limit than the UK (excepting Scotland which reduced its drink drive limit in December 2014).  

Drug driving is also a widespread menace: since the introduction of a law in March 2015, allowing police to test and arrest in England and Wales for certain illegal and legal drugs, there has been an 800% increase in arrests despite limitations in testing equipment and levels of policing. Get more facts on drink driving and drug driving and scroll down for what we need, how to take action, and more campaign news. 

However, despite the legislation that the government has put in place in 2015, the police have been limited in their ability to detect drug-driving at the roadside. This is due to the absence of Home Office type-approved roadside drug-screening devices. The type approval procedure aims to ensure devices meet government standards. Currently, there are only two devices that have type-approval, and they are only capable of screening for cannabis (THC) and cocaine. Other commonly detected drugs (notably MDMA /ecstasy) have no type-approved testing device. 

What are we calling for?

  • An effective zero-tolerance drink-drive (20mg alcohol per 100ml of blood), in line with evidence even one small drink affects driving. It should be none for the road.
  • The extension of the England and Wales drug driving law to Scotland and Northern Ireland.
  • Stepped-up and targeted enforcement, giving police the strategies, staffing and equipment to test and convict at effective levels to deter.
  • Type-approved roadside screening devices for all banned drugs, with priority given to a device that screens for MDMA (ecstasy). 

Take action

Campaign news

Brake's Roads to Justice campaigners hand in petitions at Downing Street calling for stronger criminal driving laws, 25/10/2016
Brake joins road safety groups and emergency services to call for lower drink-drive limits
, 10/10/2016
Urgent action needed as drink-drive death figures stall
, 04/08/2016
Just one shot could ruin your tournament
, 09/06/2016 
Brake responds to Northern Ireland drink-driving consultation
, 26/05/2016
Convictions up, but shocking numbers still drug-driving
, 29/02/2016  
No one loves a drunk driver, 11/02/2016
Government must learn from Scottish drink drive laws, 10/02/2016
New laws catch more reckless drug drivers than ever, 28/01/2016
Shocking numbers of drivers risked lives in Scotland last Christmas, 21/01/2016
Brake urges rugby fans to kick the risk of drink-driving into touch, 18/09/2015
Britain still struggling to break the drink drive habit, 01/08/2015 
Brake urges drivers: 'not a drop not a drag', as police launch drink and drug drive crackdown, 01/06/2015 
Brake backs Police Federation plea for lower drink drive limit, 19/05/2015 
Drug drivers beware: zero-tolerance law in force today welcomed by campaigners, 02/03/2015
Myth-busting 'sober up' e-learning resource launched, 22/01/2015
Brake echoes police calls, warning young people of dangers of drink and drug driving, 21/01/2015
Charity welcomes reduction in Scotland's drink driving rates, 09/01/2015

End notes

[1] Provisional estimates involving illegal alcohol levels2014 (final figures) and 2015 (provisional figures), Department for Transport, 2016
[2] David Phillips et a, University of California, No safe combination of drink driving, British Medical Journal, Injury prevention, January 2014
[3] ETSC, BAC drink driving limits across Europe, June 2016
[4] www.gov.uk, Drug drive arrests on the rise, February 2016
[5] Preliminary Drug Testing Devices A Guide to Type Approval Procedures for Preliminary Drug Testing Devices Used for Transport Law Enforcement in Great Britain, Home Office, 2012
[6] Approved drug-testing devices, Home Office, 2015

DVLA eyesight awareness campaign not enough to tackle issue of poor driver vision

News from Brake
Monday 23 July 2018
 
 
The DVLA has today launched a new national eyesight awareness campaign reminding drivers of the need to regularly check their eyesight. All drivers must, by law, meet the minimum eyesight standards at all times when driving - including being able to read a number plate from 20 metres.

Brake, the road safety charity, has been working with Vision Express through the ‘Driving for Zero’ campaign, to raise awareness of the dangers of poor eye health and to call for more to be done to tackle the issue of defective driver vision.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
“Any campaign to remind drivers to check their eyesight is welcome, however, awareness raising falls far short of tackling the true problem of poor driver vision, where a change in legislation is clearly required. Brake is calling for the law to be strengthened, to require drivers to prove to the DVLA they have had a recent, professional vision test when they take their driving test; and be required to have regular tests during their driving life on a regular basis. It should be obvious to all that the ability to see clearly is fundamental to safe driving and so we urge the Government to act to address the shortfall in the law and introduce mandatory eye tests for drivers now.”
 
“At present, driver eyesight is only checked through a 20-metre license plate reading before the driving test, after which a driver may never again be required to prove that their vision is fit for driving. With eye specialists stating that the 20-metre test is inadequate in assessing driver vision, and research showing someone can lose up to 40% of their vision without being aware, it is time for mandatory eye testing to be introduced.”
 
Commenting,Jonathan Lawson, CEO at Vision Express said:
"It's a positive first step to see the DVLA is spearheading a public awareness campaign to encourage drivers to take their eye health seriously - something Vision Express has been campaigning for. It is estimated that as many as 1.5m UK licence holders have never even had an eye test and road crashes caused by poor driver vision are estimated to cause 2,900 casualties. However, the 'number plate' test was introduced over 80 years ago before the Second World War and eye testing has advanced significantly since then. The NHS recommends people should have an eye test every two years, so we would encourage the DVLA to remind drivers that whilst passing the number plate might be the legal limit, the Government's own advice is to have a full eye health check with a qualified optometrist." 
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors:
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

New road safety laws a big step in the right direction for Northern Ireland

News from Brake
13th January 2016

news@brake.org.uk

Tougher drink drive laws, increased police powers, and restrictions on new drivers a big step in the right direction for road safety in Northern Ireland

Brake, the road safety charity, is welcoming the new Road Traffic (Amendment) Bill in Northern Ireland which has passed its final stage at the Assembly.  When the Bill becomes law, which should be in a matter of weeks, it will see tougher drink driving laws, tougher police powers for breath tests, night restrictions on young drivers carrying passengers and a mandatory minimum period for learning to drive before taking the test.

74 people lost their lives on the roads in Northern Ireland in 2015. That’s 74 families and communities devastated and Brake understands the far reaching impact of these deaths from its extensive work with road crash victims’ families. This new legislation is a vital tool for Northern Ireland as it strives for the goal of not one single person killed on its roads.

Young drivers are a shocking three times more likely to be killed on the roads in Northern Ireland and four times more likely to be responsible for fatal crashes than drivers over 25. We strongly support the Assembly’s aim to reduce the number of young fatalities on its roads by 55% and are urging the rest of the UK to reintroduce casualty reduction targets.  

Brake’s director of campaigns and communications, Gary Rae said: “This is a Bill designed to save lives and we welcome it. The reduction of the drink drive alcohol limit to 50mg/100ml for all drivers and 20mg/100ml for those newly qualified will help save more lives.  We would prefer the lower limit to be enforced for all drivers, but this is a step in the right direction.”

Too many young drivers are losing their lives – shockingly, three times as many are likely to be killed on the roads in Northern Ireland, and four times as many are more likely to be responsible for fatal crashes than drivers over 25.  We strongly support the introduction of what looks like the beginnings of a Graduated Driver Licence scheme, with a minimum learning period and restrictions on passenger numbers for new drivers. Northern Ireland is once again leading the way in the UK when it comes to road safety legislation and we would urge other governments to look closely at this Bill and follow suit to keep all road users safer.”

[ENDS]

Notes to Editors:

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

 

Our campaigns and how you can help

Brake campaigns nationally and regionally, and raises awareness among the public, to stop road deaths and injuries, make our communities safer and greener, and improve support for crash victims. We won't stop until the carnage ends. But we need your help..

There are many ways to support our campaigns, such as dropping a quick note to your MP, signing a petition or running activities in your community. Each page below has simple actions you can take. You can also find advice on campaigning in your community here.

Keep up to date with our campaigns through our monthly bulletin, on TwitterFacebook and the Brake blog, or browse our recent news releases in our media centre.

Campaigns:

Driving for Zero
A campaign to deliver zero tolerance for impaired and distracted driving including the menace of drink and drug driving, vision, health and tiredness.

Know it & Solve it
A campaign for government to establish an independent Road Collision Investigation Branch to improve road crash investigation.

L for Later
A campaign to help young people be safer as drivers and passengers. 

Pace for People
A campaign to reduce and enforce the speed limit in our towns, in order to reduce casualties, reduce fear of cycling and walking, reduce pollution and improve health through active travel.

Place for People
A campaign to give people in the UK space to move in ways that are safe, green, healthy and fair.

Phone Smart
A campaign to stamp out deadly driver distraction by texts, emails and calls.

Modern Vehicles
A campaign that embraces developments in vehicle technology that can save both lives and the planet, and calls on developments to be implemented in line with Brake's vision of safe, sustainable, healthy and fair transport.

A campaign for better justice and support services for people bereaved and seriously injured by road crashes.

Safer fleets
A campaign which seeks to improve the safety of at work drivers. 

 

About our campaigning:

Parliamentarian road safety awards
Recognising MPs campaigning for road safety nationally and in their constituencies

Consultation responses, speeches and policy papers
Library of Brake consultation responses, key speeches and policy papers

Our vision
Our long-term vision for a world where no one is killed or seriously injured in preventable road crashes, and communities are safe, sustainable places