Articles Tagged ‘lorry - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake comments on 'self driving' lorry tests

News from Brake
Friday 25 August, 2017

The Government has today announced plans to test small convoys of partially driverless lorries by the end of 2018. Commenting on the news, Jason Wakeford, Director of Campaigns for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Rather than platooning lorries on already congested UK roads, the Government should instead cut emissions and improve public safety by moving more freight from road to rail. Each freight train takes around 60 HGVs off the road network.

"This rigorous trial is needed to prove whether this technology really can provide the safety and environmental benefits which are claimed."

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Notes to editors:
 
Statistics on rail freight: source Network Rail (https://www.networkrail.co.uk/industry-commercial-partners/rail-freight/)

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake condemns government decision to increase speed limit for lorries on single carriageways

Thursday 24 July 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Brake, the road safety charity, has expressed serious concerns about plans announced today by the Department of Transport to raise the speed limit for lorries on single carriageway roads to 50mph.

The announcement comes as a survey by Brake and Digby Brown solicitors reveals the extent of risky driving on country roads.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "We are disappointed and concerned by this announcement. Put simply, when vehicles travel faster, it takes them longer to stop, increasing risk. It is very well evidenced that increases in speed equal increases in crashes and casualties. At the same time, the road safety justification for this move is dubious: we are not aware of evidence it will help tackle risky overtaking, which should be addressed through other means. Pronounced speed differences between traffic can pose a risk, but the way to address this is by preventing car drivers going too fast, not speeding trucks up. The minister says she wants to get the country moving, but we ask at what cost to road users and the environment?

"Our own survey has just revealed the worrying extent of dangerous fast driving on country roads. We should be taking steps to address this, through driver education, lower speed limits and better enforcement. We are concerned for rural communities already blighted by fast traffic and for those who want to safely enjoy the countryside on foot, bike or horseback. This threatens to make these problems worse."

Brake campaigns for lower speed limits – 50mph maximum and 40, 30, and 20mph where there are particular risks – to save lives on country roads through its Rural roads not racetracks campaign. Tweet us: @Brakecharity, #RuralRoadsnotRacetracks.

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Charity raises alarm bells as higher lorry speed limits come into effect

Monday 6 April 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Brake, the road safety charity, has reiterated its concern as higher speed limits for large lorriescome into effect today (6 April 2015). As announced by the government last year, speed limits in England and Wales for HGVs over 7.5 tonnes will rise from 40mph to 50mph onsingle carriageways and from 50mph to 60mph ondual carriageways.

SeeBrake’s response to the government consultation on raising the dual carriageway HGV speed limit.

Gary Rae, campaigns manager for Brake, the road safety charity, said:“We are disappointed that the government has gone against the advice of road safety groups on this issue. The decision to increase HGV speed limits is short-sighted and runs against work to more effectively manage traffic speeds and reduce casualties on our roads. The relationship between speed and casualties is a proven one, so allowing the largest vehicles on our roads to reach higher speeds more often risks more deaths, serious injuries, and additional cost to the taxpayer.

“The government itself has admitted that this move will likely have no economic or road safety benefit. It is a move designed to legitimise the dangerous behaviour of those who already break the speed limit while putting the safety of the law-abiding majority second. It sets a dangerous precedent that if traffic laws are persistently flouted; the government would rather change them than enforce them.”

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on Twitter or Facebook.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Charity warns of danger posed by increase in lorry speed limit

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Brake, the road safety charity, has expressed disappointment at government plans to raise the speed limit for large lorries on dual carriageway roads to 60mph, despite serious concerns from a number of road safety groups. The move comes on the back of the government’s decision to increase the speed limit for HGVs on single carriageway roads earlier this year.

SeeBrake’s response to the government consultation on raising the dual carriageway HGV speed limit.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive for Brake, the road safety charity, said:“This decision runs against work to more effectively manage traffic speeds and reduce casualties and emissions on our roads. As with the decision to raise the HGV speed limit on single carriageways, the government is making a leap of faith in spite of the legitimate concerns of road safety groups. The government itself admits that, at best, there will be no economic or road safety benefit. At worst, it risks increasing deaths and serious injuries on our roads if the largest vehicles are allowed to reach higher speeds more often. The relationship between increased speed and increased casualties is a proven one, so why take the risk?

“Increasing the HGV speed limit on single and dual carriageways sets a dangerous precedent, sending a message that if traffic laws are persistently flouted, the government would rather change them than get tough with the law-breaking drivers putting everyone at risk.”

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Drivers raise motorway safety fears as lorry traffic hits record high

News from Brake
Friday, 13 July 2018
 
The amount of freight being transported on our motorways is making drivers fear for their safety, a new survey of over 1,000 drivers for Brake has found [1]. The findings come as the Government publishes figures which show that lorry traffic on motorways has increased more than 15% in five years, reaching a record high of 7.9 billion vehicle miles in 2017 [2].
 
More than three-quarters of drivers stated that too much freight is being transported on our motorways and have called for further investment in railways to alleviate the pressure on the network. Shockingly, more than a quarter of drivers thought it highly likely or likely that they would be involved in a fatal or serious crash on a motorway or dual carriageway at some point in the future. These findings come as the Government is introducing truck platooning trials and all-lane running on our motorways, leading road safety campaigners to decry the prioritisation of capacity over safety.

The Brake survey found that a significant majority of drivers, 77%, believe that truck platooning “sounds frightening”, even after having the nature of the technology explained to them, and that “if it went wrong the casualties could be very high.” Drivers also expressed doubt over all-lane running, as when asked if using the hard shoulder as a driving lane would improve safety, only a third agreed.
 
The Government’s “Road Traffic Estimates: Great Britain 2017”, published last week (5 July), shows that lorry traffic on motorways reached a new peak of 7.9 billion vehicle miles in 2017. The size and weight of lorries is also increasing - traffic of lorries with four or more axles was 44% higher in 2017 than in 1997, whereas for lorries with less than four axles it had fallen by 27%.
 
Joshua Harris, Brake’s director of campaigns, said:
“At a time when the traffic on our motorways is sharply increasing, these findings show that drivers have a deep-seated and genuine concern over their safety on these roads. Drivers are particularly wary over the increase in freight traffic and it’s clear that trials of truck platooning will only exacerbate this concern. We urge the Government to prioritise safety over capacity and to ensure that any change to our road environment, such as all-lane running, is robustly tested, and the public properly informed, before the roll-out on our roads.”
 
 Phillipa Edmunds, freight on rail manager, Campaign for Better Transport, said:
“Drivers’ fear of freight on our motorways is well founded, with the latest Government figures showing that HGVs are almost three times more likely than cars to be involved in fatal crashes on these roads. Transferring more freight to the railways is a key part of making our roads safer, cleaner and less congested so we urge the Government to take note of this report’s important findings.”
 
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Notes to editors: 
 
[1] Full survey data available in Brake report “Our Strategic Road Network - PT. 2: Smart roads: put safety first”.
 
[2] Road Traffic Estimates, Great Britain 2017, Department for Transport, 5 July 2018
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.  We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.