Articles Tagged ‘pedestrians - Brake the road safety charity’

Barbara Keeley, MP for Worsley, February 2009

feb09Barbara Keeley, MP for Worsley, is stepping up her campaign for urgent improvements to pedestrian safety on the A580 East Lancashire Road as she is concerned that proposals suggested by Wigan and Salford Councils do not go nearly far enough.

Katie Gallagher, 14, became the third young pedestrian to die on the road in recent years when she was hit by a car on 14 January 2009. Barbara has joined with Katie’s friends and family to campaign for Wigan and Salford Council to take steps to improve safety on the dual carriageway.

Barbara is calling on Wigan Council to introduce a filtered pedestrian crossing at the Chaddock Lane junction, where Katie was killed, and is urging both councils to introduce an enforced 30mph speed limit along those stretches of the road in the more built-up areas where Katie’s death occurred. Barbara is also calling on both councils to undertake a full investigation into pedestrian safety measures and identify road safety hotspots on the A580 where improvements, such as pedestrian push-button facilities, can be introduced.

She has also taken her fight to local newspapers, Manchester Evening News and Wigan News, in order to highlight the importance of the campaign and gain extra support.

As a result of the campaign, the councils have promised to reduce speed limits from 60mph to 50mph, but Barbara has pledged to continue to lobby the councils stating that their proposals do not go nearly far enough. During the last five years there have been 172 collisions resulting in 11 serious injuries and one death on the Salford section of the road and so Barbara is calling on both councils to look more widely at crashes and fatalities and consider what improvements can be made.

Brake will keep you updated with the progress of Barbara’s campaign.

Barbara Keeley MP said: “I want to see speeds along the built-up sections of this road brought down to 30mph. A pedestrian hit by a vehicle travelling at 30mph has an 80% chance of survival, whereas a pedestrian hit by a vehicle travelling at 40mph has a 90% chance of being killed.

“It is the responsibility of both Wigan and Salford councils to protect pedestrians crossing the East Lancashire Road. I want both councils to conduct urgent investigations to see where pedestrian safety can be improved.”

If you know of a dangerous road in your area, call Brake’s Zak the zebra hotline on 08000 68 77 80 or report the road online, and Brake could help you campaign for road safety improvements.

Brake backs Walk to School Week – a healthier and happier start to the day for you and the planet

News from Brake

16 May 2016
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, is encouraging families to get out of their cars and on to their feet as part of Living Streets’ Walk to School Week.

Half of our children are driven to school, yet the average school run for primary age children is just 1.5 miles.[i]

Average walking trips per person have decreased by 27% since 1995, with walking now making up just over a fifth (22%) of trips in Britain.[ii]

In that time congestion and air pollution have increased, as have our waistlines, with childhood obesity being described be experts as an epidemic.

Driving less means there will be less harmful pollution pumped into our atmosphere and children and parents will get more exercise. There are financial benefits too. It’s estimated an average family can save £642 a year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling. [iii]

Regular walking, jogging and cycling can help guard against asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers.[iv]

Alice Bailey communications and campaigns adviser for Brake, the road safety charity, said: Walking to school, which was once so common place, seems to be the second option for most parents nowadays. We need walking to school to become the norm once again and events such as Walk to School Week and next month’s Brake’s Giant Walk can hopefully showcase the benefits of an active start to the day rather than jumping in the car.

Joe Irvin, Living Streets’ CEO said: “Not only are we experiencing a childhood obesity crisis, we’re also facing a rise in mental health and wellbeing problems. We know that keeping active is a major part of the solution.
“We must prioritise ways of encouraging physical activity if we want today’s children to become healthy adults. The walk to school is a free, easy and accessible way for parents and their children to achieve this. Sadly, just 46 per centof primary school children walk to school compared to 70 per cent of their parents’ generation. We must reverse this decline.”Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics (2011)

[i] Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics (2011)
[ii] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2013
[iii] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station (June 2014)
[iv] NHS http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx (2015)

Notes to Editors:

About Brake’s Giant Walk
Brake’s Giant Walk is an annual event in primary schools where children learn about traffic pollution and danger, and transport choices. Schools taking part get their pupils to walk (in a crocodile of supervised kids, holding hands on safe pavements, or around the school’s grounds) which gives children a voice, helping them tell drivers to slow down and look out for people on foot. Children can be sponsored to take part and schools can run fundraising events, helping fund Brake's campaigns and services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes.

About Walk to School Week

Walk to School Week 2016 will take place 16-20 May. For more information visit https://www.livingstreets.org.uk/what-we-do/projects/walk-to-school-week

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

Brake calls for reintroduction of casualty reduction targets, as road deaths and serious injuries rise

Thursday 24 September 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the government to show strong leadership and reintroduce casualty reduction targets as the Department for Transport publishes its Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain Annual Report for 2014. It shows that 1,775 people died on the roads (a 4% increase on the year before). 22,807 more were seriously injured (a 5% annual increase).

Casualties of all severities rose to 194,477 in Great Britain in 2014, an increase of 6% from 2013, interrupting what was a steady downward trend since 1997.

Brake believes the reintroduction of ambitious casualty reduction targets, axed in 2010, must be a key first step in an urgently needed fightback against road danger, alongside a ‘vision zero’ approach that acknowledges that any number of road deaths is unacceptable.

People on foot and bike bore the brunt of the rise:

  • Pedestrian deaths rose by 12% to 446, accounting for three quarters of the overall rise in fatalities.
  • Serious injuries to cyclists rose by 8% to 3,401, continuing a long term trend that has been ongoing since 2004.

Worryingly, traffic levels in 2014 were 2.4% higher than in 2013. Air pollution is estimated to cause 24,000 deaths a year in the UK, half attributable to road transport [1].  The number of cars is set to increase by 43% by 2035 and traffic delays by 50% [2].

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: “We should be under no illusions as to the seriousness of these figures. The government needs to get a grip of this situation, and it can start by reintroducing ambitious casualty reduction targets, with an ultimate aim of reducing deaths and serious injuries on our roads to zero. We know from running our helpline for devastated road crash victims that every road death causes unimaginable human suffering, and every one is preventable. The increases in serious casualties among pedestrians and cyclists are especially horrifying, given the importance of protecting vulnerable road users and enabling people to walk and cycle more.

“At a time when car manufacturers have serious questions to answer on vehicle emissions, it is worrying to see a growth in vehicle traffic. The price for this is being paid by individuals, families and the planet, and it’s not a price worth paying. That’s why our theme for this year’s Road Safety Week, Drive less, live more, is focused on encouraging people to think again about why, when and how we drive private vehicles.”

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

 [1] The Cost of Air Pollution, OECD (2014)

 [2] Keeping the Nation Moving – Time to face the facts, RAC Foundation (2011)

 

Brake comments as Britain’s road safety record stagnates

News from Brake
Thursday 27 September
 
Improvement in Britain’s road safety has stagnated, with the number of people killed and seriously injured on Britain’s roads increasing marginally from 2016 - 2017, according to Government statistics published today [1].
 
Figures from the Department for Transport show that 1,793 people were killed in collisions last year,  the highest annual total since 2011 but with just one additional road death on 2016.
 
A total of 24,831 people were seriously injured last year - a rise of three per cent (from 24,101 in 2016), which has been attributed by the Government at least in part due to changes in the way many police forces now report collision data [1].
 
The figures also reveal that motorcyclists now make up 19% of all road deaths in Britain, up 9% on 2016 to 349 deaths, and pedestrian fatalities increased by 5% to 470.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
Today’s figures highlight the shocking lack of progress on road safety improvement in Britain. This stagnation must be arrested and yet the Government sits on its hands and rejects the introduction of policies which are proven to save lives - for the individuals, families and whole communities devastated by road crashes, this is simply not good enough.”
 
“Our most vulnerable road users, pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists, remain at dangerously high risk on our roads, paying the price for the dominance of the motor car in our lives. Pedestrian deaths increased to their highest level this decade whilst motorcyclists now account for nearly a fifth of all road deaths, despite their small numbers. The Government must invest in active travel to give people safe and healthy ways to get around and focus on improving the safety of our roads – starting with lower speed limits.”
 
“Our laws are only as strong as their enforcement and roads policing is fundamental to improving UK road safety. Shockingly, the number of traffic officers fell 24% from 2012-2017 and the stagnation in road safety performance shadows this trend. We urge the Government to make roads policing a national investment priority, with a visible police presence catching and deterring illegal driving and cameras preventing the scourge of speeding.”
 
“Casualty reduction targets are a proven catalyst for road safety improvement and yet, since 2010, the UK Government has rejected this approach. With the UK’s deterioration in road safety showing no signs of abating, we urge the introduction of national road casualty reduction targets as a priority. The Government must have its feet held to the fire on road safety.”
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors:
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across East Midlands is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the East Midlands every six minutes
  • One third (32%) of primary school children in the Midlands have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen daily on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The campaign is being backed by a bereaved family from the East Midlands, where 148 people were killed and 1,731 seriously injured last year. See case study below.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, companies and communities will be raising awareness and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 89,829 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the East Midlands in 2013– one every six minutes. 88,499 were for speeding and 1,330 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of over 400 Midlands primary school children[4], released today, show:

  • four in five (82%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • one third (32%) have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

 Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.”

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other; being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Weekhere.

Timothy Igoea, 45, from Heighington, Lincolnshire,was crossing the road on a spring day when he was hit on the back of the head by a van wing mirror. He subsequently died in hospital. Find out more.

Timothy’s brother, Gary Igoea, lives in Lincoln. He says:“Tim’s death affected everybody in so many different ways. He was a truly special man; there are not many people you will meet in life like him. There was a strength about him that would dumbfound anyone, especially after his first crash; he almost pushed his disabilities to one side in his determination. I am so proud to have had a brother like Tim – when most people would have crumbled, he stayed strong. He had an incredible passion for life and he was taken from us and his family too early. That’s why, this Road Safety Week, I want to tell people that when you get into a car, it’s like holding a loaded gun: you have the power to destroy both the life of the victim and the lives of their family and friends. So please, look out for each other, don’t be complacent, and be courteous on the road.”

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Thereforeit is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 433 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the Midlands participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 82% said yes, 18% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 32% said yes, 68% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across East of England is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the East of England every five minutes
  • Two in five (38%) primary school children in the East of England have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen daily on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. In the East of England region, 178 people were killed and 2,191 seriously injured last year.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, companies and communities will be raising awareness and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 98,084 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the East of England in 2013 – one every five minutes. 96,116 were for speeding and 1,968 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of 400 primary school children in the East region[4], released today, show:

  • three in five (63%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • two in five (38%) have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.” 

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0.These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 358 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the East of England participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 63% said yes, 37% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 38% said yes, 62% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across North East is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the North East every 11 minutes
  • Half (49%) of primary school children in the North East say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen every day on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The campaign is being backed by a bereaved family from the North East, where 76 people were killed and 726 seriously injured last year. See case study below.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, communities and companies will be raising awareness, and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 46,359 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the North East in 2013– one every 11 minutes. 45,823 were for speeding and 536 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of 400 primary school children in the North East[4], released today, show:

  • three in five (59%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • half (49%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

That’s why Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.”

Cllr Michael Mordey, portfolio holder for city services at Sunderland City Council, added:“While the number of road casualties year on year has remained similar, a key indicator of road safety is the number of serious casualties – and in Sunderland, we have seen some pleasing reductions recently. However, as we can see from Steven's tragic story, there is no room for complacency. We are working with our partners in the emergency and health services and other stakeholders and interest groups to learn what we can from the causes and trends in order to ensure we reduce casualties further. Safety is the responsibility of every road user, so we remind all drivers, riders, passengers, pedestrians and professional drivers to think about safety at all times.”

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Weekhere.

Steven Atkinson, 12, from Sunderland, was pushing his bike across Chester Road in 2009 when he was hit by a speeding driver. He was rushed to hospital, where he died from his injuries.Find out more.

 

Violet Atkinson, Steven’s mother, says:“After everything Steven went through, I am so proud of him. He never looked at his health as a problem and lived every day to the full. No words can describe the grief our family has gone through since his death. There’s a piece of us missing and there’s no way to escape that. My son is gone. I will never see him again, and it will never get easier. I don’t want another mother to experience the pain of seeing her child die. People need to wake up to the consequences of driving irresponsibly. This year’s Road Safety Week, I’m asking everyone to look out for each other on the road, and in particular for drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities, look twice and take it slow at junctions and bends, and give pedestrians and cyclists plenty of room.’’

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 417 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the North East participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 59% said yes, 41% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 49% said yes, 51% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across UK is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Note: this is the national version of this release. Click here for versions specific to your region or specialist audience.

  • Two fixed penalties for 'careless driving' or speeding issued every minute
  • Two in five (41%) UK primary school children say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen every day on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which police across the country will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of UK drivers senselessly risking lives by flouting traffic laws. Almost one million fixed penalty notices were issued for 'careless driving' and speeding offences in 2013 –almost two a minute. 950,505 were for speeding and 17,483 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by region and postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas [3].

This lack of patience and consideration towards other road users can and does result in tragedy (see case studies below). It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake's survey of 5,000 primary school children [4], released today, show:

  • two thirds (67%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • two in five (41%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

That's why Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect people on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for the look out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don't look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That's why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we're asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we're all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes."

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers' national lead for roads policing, added: "Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake's week."

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying: "Britain has some of the safest roads in the world and improving safety is an absolute priority for this government. Cycling and walking are both great exercise and benefit our environment and economy, and I want more people to feel safe on our roads.

"This is why we have made significant investments in road safety and improved education resources for schools, made it easier for councils to introduce 20mph zones and increased fixed penalties for driving offences."

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented: "A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says: "Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, 'look out for each other'. But 'looking out for each other' isn't just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it's about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road."

Facts and advice:

'Vulnerable road users' (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders) account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver's speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can't, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates [7], and drivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash [8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won't notice a difference in your journey time. You'll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it's safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it's a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer [13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error [14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, at www.brake.org.uk/pledge

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Week here.
Iris Yee and Gary Igoea will be at the national launch and available for interview. Caroline MacIntyre will be at the Edinburgh launch and is available for pre-recorded interviews.

Lidia Zoetemelk, 42, from London, was travelling to work on her 50cc scooter in south east London when she was hit by a turning truck. She was killed instantly. Find out more.

Lidia's partner, Iris Yee, says: "Lidia's death was a shock to everyone who knew her. To have someone so young, with such a vibrant zest and energy for life, die so tragically and unexpectedly, has been devastating. My world collapsed when she was killed. We were on the brink of starting the next chapter of our lives. We had so much to look forward to, with so many exciting plans and dreams. I have no anger towards the driver of the vehicle for what happened, but I do want to help prevent more tragedies. Lidia often commuted to work by moped or bicycle. She was one of many vulnerable road users. This is why I'm supporting Road Safety Week. More has to be done to prevent deaths like Lidia's, especially improving visibility for drivers of large vehicles, and persuading all drivers to slow down and keep careful look out for people on foot and bike. We all have a responsibility to look out for each other, especially the most vulnerable road users.''

 


Jason MacIntyre, 34, from Fort William, was a well-known Scottish racing cyclist. He was hit by a van while on his bike on 15 January 2008 and died on the way to hospital. Find out more.

Caroline MacIntyre, Jason's wife, says: "The crash has had a catastrophic impact on our lives; it is with us on a daily basis, not only for me, but for our daughters. It has been seven years since the crash and it never gets easier. I'm not sure it's fully sunk in for any of us yet. As an up and coming cycling star he had lots of supporters who were also devastated. He was the most incredible husband and father throughout the difficulties we had with our daughter Morgan being in intensive care, and he put his family above anything. It is devastating for me to be bringing up our children without their father. It takes just a few moments to double check for vulnerable road users like Jason on his bike, and a moment of impatience can cost someone their life. Is that something you can live with on your conscience? So my message to drivers is please, slow down and take your time to look out for people – don't risk destroying lives.''

 


Timothy Igoea, 44, from Heighington, Lincolnshire, was crossing the road on a spring day when he was hit on the back of the head by a van wing mirror. He subsequently died in hospital. Find out more.

Timothy's brother, Gary Igoea, lives in Lincoln. He says: "Tim's death affected everybody in so many different ways. He was a truly special man; there are not many people you will meet in life like him. There was a strength about him that would dumbfound anyone, especially after his first crash; he almost pushed his disabilities to one side in his determination. I am so proud to have had a brother like Tim – when most people would have crumbled, he stayed strong. He had an incredible passion for life and he was taken from us and his family too early. That's why, this Road Safety Week, I want to tell people that when you get into a car, it's like holding a loaded gun: you have the power to destroy both the life of the victim and the lives of their family and friends. So please, look out for each other, don't be complacent, and be courteous on the road."

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/ 

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 4,787 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools across the UK participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 67% said yes, 33% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 41% said yes, 59% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across West Midlands is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the West Midlands every six minutes
  • A third (32%) of primary school children in the Midlands say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen every day on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The campaign is being backed by bereaved families from the West Midlands, where 156 people were killed and 1,642 seriously injured last year. Case studies below.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, communities and companies are raising awareness, and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers senselessly risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 94,225 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the West Midlands in 2013– one every six minutes. 92,732 were for speeding and 1,493 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of 400 primary school children in the Midlands[4], released today, show:

  • four in five (82%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • a third (32%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.”

Ross Stephenson, road casualty reduction team manager, West Midlands Fire Service, said:“Our main aim is to reduce the number of people, especially young people, being killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions across the West Midlands. Over the past few years, West Midlands Fire Service has fully supported Brake’s Road Safety Week and we are pleased to have been given the opportunity to launch this year’s event in the West Midlands. We want the ‘look out for each other’ message to educate as many drivers, passengers and pedestrians as possible. We are urging drivers to slow down and for pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists to be fully alert to what is happening around them at all times.”

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Weekhere.

Sarah Child, 26, from Great Barr, Birmingham, a daughter, sister and aunt-to-be, was killed by a speeding driver while crossing the road with her heavily pregnant sister, Claire. Find out more.

Avril Child, Sarah’s mother, says: ‘’Sarah was a kind, beautiful daughter, who loved life and had lots of things she wanted to do. She loved her family more than anything. She lived with Claire in a house divided into two flats – so Claire not only lost her sister, and was herself seriously injured, but she also lost her home – all before having her daughter, Evie Mae. This tragedy has turned our world upside down, all because of somebody not taking the care and attention to slow down or see my poor daughters crossing the street. There is nothing that can bring Sarah back, but I hope just one person reads this and it makes them re-think how they drive to prevent more road casualties. I hope that everyone looks out for each other following this year’s Road Safety Week, and in particular that drivers will slow down to 20mph in communities, look twice and take it slow at junctions and bends, and are considerate to vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists.’’


 

Nicholas Andrews, 17, from Redditch,was hit by a car while walking along a grass verge to go to the shop. Hesuffered serious head injuries and died in hospital five days later. Find out more.

Helen Andrews, Nicholas’ sister, says:“Nicholas’s death has been horrendous for me and my family. We think about him every day. He was the best big brother anyone could ever ask for. He was so popular, funny and kind, and he could always make you laugh even if you felt like the world was ending – which, for me, it did when he died. The house was so empty and silent. I hated it. This huge personality, this beautiful person with the most wonderful smile, was gone. This Road Safety Week, we are asking all drivers to be as vigilant as possible to protect others. I always take care to look out for cyclists and pedestrians when I am driving as they can easily make mistakes, which they don’t deserve to die for.”

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and people around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 433 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the Midlands participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 82% said yes, 18% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 32% said yes, 68% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake responds to Cycling and Walking consultation.

Department for Transport consultation on cycling and walking investment strategy

Response from Brake, the road safety charity, May 2015

Brake’s position on cycling and walking investment

Brake welcomes this consultation and its acknowledgement that further investment in cycling and walking is essential. Currently a quarter of car journeys (23%) are less than two miles[i], a distance which can easily be covered on foot or by bike.

Brake believes road safety isn’t solely about driving safely and within the law. It’s also about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing everything we can to protect ourselves and people around us, especially vulnerable road users. A big part of that is providing infrastructure that not only encourages active travel but also protects those who walk and cycle from the dangers on our roads.

Brake has more than 20 years’ experience in the road safety and sustainable transport field and can point to policies that can be deployed to try to increase the numbers walking and cycling address the issue of inactivity and.

On the basis of Brake’s experience in road safety, Brake recommends

• Reducing the urban speed limit 20mph, instead of 30mph. This is in line with evidence that shows reducing speed limits lowers casualty numbers amongst those who cycle and walk.
• Implementing more segregated cycle ways. This is in line with evidence that shows that the injury risk to cyclists reduces significantly.
• Create and invest in improved infrastructure that benefits cycling and walking both in the long term and the short term.
• Create new routes that encourage cycling and walking.

Some key evidence supporting these recommendations includes:

• The implementation of bike lanes has been shown to cut injury risk to cyclists by 50%, dedicated bike lanes cut injury risk to cyclists significantly more, by 90%[ii].
• A trial of 20mph limits in Warrington, Cheshire, found pedestrian and cyclist casualties dropped 36%[iii] and analysis of 75 20mph limit sites in Scotland found casualties dropped 42%[iv].
• Walking and cycling levels rose by up to 12% in Bristol after a 20mph limit was introduced[v].
• 20mph limits boost the economic sustainability of local areas. Safer areas for walking and cycling are seen as more desirable areas to live, boosting local businesses and increasing the value of homes in these areas[vi].
• Fear of traffic can also discourage people from walking or cycling. A Brake survey found one in three non-cyclists (35%) would cycle their commute if routes were safer[vii].
• A YouGov poll commissioned by British Cycling revealed that 71% of people support building cycle tracks on main roads[viii].

Question One: The Government would be interested to hear views on the approach and actions set out in section 8 of this strategy

The three themes mentioned in section 8 which will deliver the ambition of the government, could be improved significantly. On Better Safety, there needs to be more done to ensure policing of speed limits are enforces by the police – this is proving to be more difficult as numbers of traffic offices have decreased significantly since 2008, by nearly 12% in the United Kingdom[ix]. With better policed roads and lower limits – cyclists and pedestrians would feel safer and more inclined to choose forms of active travel than using their cars.

On Better Mobility, more needs to be done to integrate all forms of transport to promote active travel. Not only does the Government have to do more to promote cycling and walking – more needs to be done to integrate public transport with active travel with all public transport stations requiring more cycle spaces and the right environments that makes active travel more appealing.

Finally, with Better Streets, there needs to be serious thought given to town and street planning, to create an environment for all road users and not just cars as there has been in the past.

The most important point to take from the strategies outlined in section 8 is that what has been outlined requires appropriate funding nationwide. The United Kingdom has one of the lowest usages of cycles in Europe as the main mode of transport, only six nations in Europe rank lower[x]. Without appropriate funding, more than the £316million[xi] promised over the next five years, then it is likely that the targets outlines will be missed and the United Kingdom will continue to lag behind the more forward thinking European nations.

Question Three: The Government would be interested to hear suggestions and evidence of innovative projects and programmes which could be developed to deliver the objectives outlined in Section 4.

For the objectives set out in section four to be achieved, the focus must be on consulting local residents and those who cycle and walk on their own needs. There certainly is an appetite for cycling and walking, especially on shorter journeys. In recent surveys conducted by Brake we found that three in four parents (74%) say their family would walk more if the safety of nearby roads was improved[xii] and three in four school children (76%) would like to walk and cycle more, but more than half (56%) worry they might be run over when walking or cycling on roads[xiii].

A recent survey by Churchill Insurance indicated 35% of parents felt road safety at their local school had worsened in the past five years. To improve safety on roads around schools, through cycle lanes, 20mph speed limits and improved crossings would ensure that more school children would use active travel in their daily routine to get to school.

Furthermore, Britain ranked 23rd for progress in tackling cycling deaths over the period between 2003 and 2013, seeing a fall of less than 3%[xiv]. Without appropriate funding, planning and strategy the desire to double cycling activity by 2025 will falter. Whilst the appetite is there for an increase in participation in active travel, the funding is not and perhaps more of the funding that has been ring-fenced for road projects needs to be redistributed to ensure a safer environment to encourage walking and cycling.

Question Four: The Government would be interested to hear your views on how to increase cycling and walking in typically under-represented groups (for example women, older people, or those from black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds

Brake believes that participation in walking and cycling by under-represented groups would be increased by making urban speed limits 20mph. As evidence mentioned earlier shows, roads are safer for cyclists and pedestrians with the lower limit and more people are inclined to walk or cycle more as they feel safer. This is especially the case among the most vulnerable in our society such as older people, children and parents with young children.

As for targeting those from different ethnic backgrounds the impetus should be on getting underrepresented groups into cycling and walking when they are young; educating them on the benefits and in the case of cycling – teaching them in schools. The Bikeability scheme, which has seen nearly two million people trained, would be the ideal resource to use as it could be rolled out to schools with a diverse ethnic background.

One further way that under-represented groups could be encouraged into cycling is through Bike Libraries. The scheme that was launched in Yorkshire as part of the legacy of the Grand Depart of the Tour de France in 2014 has seen 31 bike libraries created across the county, providing a place where people can give away their old and unused bikes to be loaned out to those who need them. This would be ideal in deprived areas and in areas from differing background who may not get an opportunity to own, use or learn to ride a bike.

[i] National Travel Survey 2014, Department for Transport, 2015
[ii] American Journal of Public Health, 2012.
[iii] 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[iv] 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001
[v] Greater Bristol Cycling City, Bristol City Council, 2011
[vi] Motor Vehicle Speeds: Recommendations for Urban Sustainability, Transportation Research Board, 2012
[vii] Commuters call for safer streets for cycling, to enable more to get on their bikes, Brake 2015
[viii] New poll reveals overwhelming public support for new cycling infrastructure, British Cycling 2016

[ix] Research briefing: levels of traffic police 2008-2012 in GB, Brake, 2013
[x] UK ranked Europe's 10th Most Cycle Friendly Nation, Road.cc, 2013
[xi] Time for action on clean air, Sustrans, 2016
[xii] Bereaved family back Beep Beep! initiative for safer roads for kids as survey reveals parents’ fears from fast traffic, Brake and Churchill, 2012
[xiii] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake and webuyanycar.com, 2014
[xiv] Making Walking and Cycling on Europe’s roads safer, European Transport Safety Council, 2015.

 

Brake's Giant Walk 2015 - what happened

On 10 June 2015 tens of thousands of children from hundreds of primary schools across the UK walked for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that in the UK every day four children are seriously hurt or killed while walking.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2015 did on the day, and see more pictures on our facebook page.

E Little Plumstead Primary School 2Little Plumstead Primary School in Norfolkhad a whole school assembly where they learned about car stopping distances and some road safety basics, before setting off on their Giant Walk. Older children paired up with the younger ones to walk through the streets around the school, and parents stayed to watch the very long crocodile of children carrying banners they had made at home. Over 200 children took part, and raised an amazing £507.50 on the day.

 

Ripley Junior School in Derbyshire had aEM Ripley Junior School 2 great afternoon of activities which included road safety talks in class, before hitting the streets with local police and parents also getting involved. They managed to raise a fantastic£668.03 to support Brake’s campaigns for safer roads and to support bereaved and injured victims of road crashes.

 

 

NE Barmston Village School 1 resizedBarmston Village Primary School in Sunderland incorporated their Giant Walk into their Health and Safety Week activities, where they learned how to keep themselves safe through road safety talks in class, and roleplaying in the playground. Children dressed as police officers and directed the others on bikes and scooters around road crossings drawn on the playground, baked traffic light biscuits, and drew pictures of all the fun things they had done to take home.

 

NW Trinity St Peters 2 resized250 children from Trinity St Peter's in Merseyside raised a brilliant £341.59, using their Giant Walk to initiate aparking pledge with the local community: allowing parents to park on unoccupied driveways. Alongside the walk and road safety talks in class, the children created and displayed a massive banner highlighting the importance of road safety outside their school.

SperrinviewSperrinview Special School in County Tyrone invited their local police officer to speak to children about the importance of road safety, who then escorted them on their Giant Walk. The school is on an extremely busy road, with many drivers going at 40mph, so the children made and carried posters encouraging them to GO20. The school also raised a fantastic £338 for Brake alongside their walk.

 

Aboyne Primary School in Aberdeenshire were the top fundraisers this year, raising an amazing £1296.34. They made banners to take on their Giant Walk, and calledfor safer roads in their community and around the school grounds when dropping off and collecting children.

SE Gresham Primary School 1Parents, volunteers and staff joined 240 children atGresham Primary School in Croydon for aRoad Safety afternoon packed with fun activities, including the local road safety officers from the council joining the children for an assembly. After roleplaying on road crossings they drew on the playground, the children headed out for their Giant Walk, chanting slogans and rhymes, and raising £65.30.

 

 

 

Children of all ages at Woolacombe School in Devon got involved in classroom activities before the Giant Walk, from Year 6 studying graphs in maths lessons, to Year 4 making road safety leaflets to share with the younger children. The older children also joined thePolice Liaison Officer for a speed workshop, using a speed gun outside the school to stop speeding drivers. Younger children made placards and banners for the walk, and the school raised £94.60 on a 'Wear Something Bright' day.

WM St Brigids Catholic Primary School 3 resizedSt Brigid's Catholic Primary School in Birmingham used their Giant Walk as an opportunity to involve the whole school community in the School Council's ongoing campaign for a reduced speed limit outside the school. Before the walk, the school councillors conducted a road safety survey and collected signatures on a petition to enforce a 20mph speed limit. They also held a protest which was supported by local councillor Steve Booton, and representatives from their MP Richard Burden's office. On the day of their Giant Walk, the children made banners and posters to carry, and were joined by their local community police officer, and raised a brilliant £430.14.

Shortbrook Primary School in Sheffield invited parents to join their children on a walk to the local park, where they hada huge family picnic. The fantastic event got the whole school involved, with children from nursery to Year 6 joining the Giant Walk, and raised an amazing £806.83 for Brake.

Brake's Giant Walk 2016 - what happened

On 15 June 2016 over 25,000 children from schools across the UK walked for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that in the UK every day four children are seriously hurt or killed while walking.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2016 did on the day, see more pictures on our facebook page and follow @Brakecharity and use #BrakesGiantWalk on Twitter!

Read our full report on Brake's Giant Walk 2016

 

 

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The children at St John the Baptist C of E Primary School in Penistone had lots of fun showing off their posters as they walked around the local village. A local councillor and staff from their local Tesco store also joined them, encouraging drivers to slow down and supporting their message of not driving to school. Check them out in action in our 2016 video.

 

  

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Pupils and parents from St John’s C of E Primary School in Harrow, London, joined forces to campaign for safer roads in their community. The children made their own placards and raised awareness in their local community, encouraging drivers to slow down. Teachers said they found it a really positive experience, bringing the school communities together to help raise awareness of road safety. Fantastically, alongside all of their hard work they raised more than £1000 for Brake!

 

 

 

  

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Brake’s mascot Zak the Zebra joined more than 300 children from Neilston Primary School in Scotland. They learned about how to be safe on their walk before meeting up with another school and holding a mini road show. A local police officer talked about the importance of road safety and school principal teacher Jane McDermott said “Watching the children out in the village gives a great feeling of togetherness and community as well as promoting the importance of road safety.

 

 

giantwalk dunstableAt St Augustine’s Academy, Bedfordshire, in partnership with Dunstable Town Council, the children played road safety games and discussed how to be safe when crossing the road. They then created their own posters and used these, along with Brake’s, to take to the streets during a long two-mile walk to raise awareness of road safety in their local community. The children enjoyed using their posters to communicate important messages about slowing down to drivers and the young people who participated on the walk continued to learn about road safety at Junior Wardens - an after school programme.

  

 

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Lots of laughs and fun was had at the 11th Walsall Rainbows in West Midlands. The girls really enjoyed learning about road safety all term and completed their road safety badge. They also made posters which they showed their parents and told them the importance of being safe on the roads. They loved getting their stickers for completing the walk and found the resources really informative.

  

 

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River Beach Primary School didn’t let the soggy weather dampen their walk as they met in the morning and all walked to school together, campaigning for drivers to slow down. They were met at the school gates by their teachers, congratulating them on their walk before dispersing into class to continue their school day.

 

 

 

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400 children took part at Carnmoney Primary School in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, who managed to raise a wonderful £381.60! Alongside their walk around the community where they campaigned for safer roads, they held different road safety activities within class. They also had a poster colouring competition and the winner got theirs made into a placard to carry on their walk!

 

 

 

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Barmston Village School went on their walk outside of their school gates so that the local community in Durham could notice them. They took their ‘slow down’ banners, having lots of fun spreading the message of being safe around roads. In class they made their own posters on the different issues surrounding road safety and the importance of drivers slowing down on their roads.

 

 

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In Liverpool, over 1000 children took part in road safety activities which emphasised the importance of St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Infant and Junior School’s Giant Walk. School Council Representatives met and discussed ideas to raise awareness of road safety prior to the event. A competition was launched to design the best road safety poster; these posters were used on the day to encourage drivers in their community to slow down. The children also had lots of fun chanting and making their voices heard. They even had their parents out campaigning while they stood opposite the school with their own posters and banners and invited families to complete a ‘Family Road Safety Pledge’ to show how everyone works together to ensure their children’s safety.

 

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Red Oaks Primary School in Wiltshire took what they’d learnt throughout the year on road safety and incorporated it into their walk. Alongside their lessons on road safety and discussion on how to be safe and be seen in assembly, they took to the streets to tell drivers to slow down. They also raised £209.92 to help continue Brake’s work.

 

 

 

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Local police officers visited Gayton Junior School in Derby on their Giant Walk to help their 360 children cross the road. The children’s parents also joined in, helping to raise awareness of the importance of slowing down. In preparation for their walk, the children made informative posters and discussed road safety in class. They raised a fantastic £115.15 for Brake!

Brake's Kids Walk 2018 What Happened

On 13 June 2018 over 120,000 kids from schools across the UK walked for safer roads and to help Brake call for footpaths, cycle paths, safe places to cross, slow traffic and clean traffic; five important road safety messages so we can stop the 5 children who are being killed or hurt on our roads every single day! The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling to school within their community.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to engage pupils with road safety and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

You can read our evaluation report here.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2018 did on the day. Follow @Brakecharity on Twitter and use #BrakesKidsWalk for more pictures.

 

BKW2018 YH Penshurst Group 2More than 450 children from Penshurst Primary School walked around their community in Hessle, Hull. They held a school assembly the week before the walk, ensuring the kids were engaged with road safety. The pupils then made their own banners, including Kids Walk placards, to take on the walk along with the Brake posters from the action pack. Pupils from Hessle High School, Brake mascot Zak the Zebra and a safety officer from Humberside Fire and Rescue Service joined the walk and helped the children to campaign for safer roads. Their activities were captured by ITV Calendar and many local radio stations. The children also raised £1,000 for Brake through sponsorship.

BKW2018 E Arthur Bugler BrakePupils at Arthur Bugler Primary School in Essex raised £1,200 for Brake by getting friends and family to sponsor them for their Kids Walk. The school used the template sponsorship form in their action pack to encourage parents to give generously and support Brake’s work supporting road crash victims and campaigning for safer roads. The children carried banners and posters from their action pack during the walk, to show residents the things they need to keep them safe near roads. Brake mascot Zak the Zebra visited the school after the event to thank the children.

BKW2018 Rockingham Primary School 2

Corby Borough Council’s rural pride officer Suzanne Preston helped the children at Rockingham Primary School run their Brake’s Kids Walk. She was joined by their local neighbourhood wardens to talk to the kids about road safety. They ran an assembly for the school, talking about the health and planet-saving benefits of walking. During the walk, the kids were encouraged to hold up their hand when they spotted a road safety object.

“Brake’s Kids Walk provided a great way for us to discuss road safety from a different perspective and we helped make it relevant to the children's local area.” – Suzanne Preston, rural pride officer, Corby Borough Council.

BKW2018 SW The Castle Primary School 2Around 300 pupils from The Castle Primary School walked in crocodile formation around the school grounds to raise awareness of road safety in Tiverton, Devon. Children had banners and posters as they called for safer roads, so they can walk in their communities without fear of traffic and pollution. The school featured on their local BBC Spotlight evening news programme and also raised £217.34 for Brake.

“We have really appreciated having the opportunity to join in with such a worthwhile campaign. Keeping our children safe is paramount and this includes road safety.” - Sue Palk, high-level teaching assistant, The Castle Primary School

BKW2018 Wales St Helens 6Children at St Helen’s Catholic Primary School in Barry, Wales, made full use of the bilingual resources provided in the Kids Walk action pack. They proudly held up banners and posters in Welsh and English to make sure the whole community was aware of what they want to keep them safe. The children also made their own banners, calling on adults to keep them safe when using roads. Posters about the benefits of walking to school were displayed around the school. While on the walk, children talked to residents about why they were taking part and the importance of road safety.St Christophers School Wales


In Wrexham, St Christopher’s School held a Wear Your Stripes Day to raise funds for Brake. They also made traffic light biscuits and stripy cupcakes and collected sponsorship money for their walk, raising a fantastic £157 for Brake. In class they completed the action pack resources, to ensure that they were focused on road safety issues during their walk and made zebra masks to wear to look like our mascot Zak the Zebra.

BKW2018 London Salisbury Primary School2
The children and staff at Salisbury Primary School in London dressed in their stripiest clothes as they combined their Kids Walk with a Wear Your Stripes Day. The pupils designed their own banners and posters during classroom activities, before taking them on their walk to call for safer streets. They walked around the community close to their school to promote road safety measures such as 20mph speed limits and safe crossing places. Their fundraising activities helped raise £150 for Brake.

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Pupils from St Colm’s High School in Draperstown, Northern Ireland, teamed up with their local primary school – St Mary’s Primary School – to help them with their walk. Pupils involved in both schools used the resources from the action pack to help inspire other pupils and the local community about what they want to see to make their roads safer. They organised a walk around the local town, displaying banners to help raise awareness of important road safety issues. They even helped out the community by carrying out a clean-up of the town, litter picking as they went on their walk and the school donated £50 to Brake.

Zak 1PC Michael Goldie, school campus officer for Police Scotland, took Brake mascot Zak the Zebra on a tour of primary schools in East Renfrewshire. He visited Hillview, Neilston, St John’s, St Mark’s, and St Thomas’ primary schools, ensuring that more than 1,000 kids put their best feet forward to promote road safety and the health benefits of walking. PC Goldie delivered a number of assemblies before the pupils made their own posters and banners to take on the walk. Parents, volunteers from the local high school, school crossing officers from East Renfrewshire Council and emergency services joined the schools on their walks through the community. They walked to their local park to celebrate their achievements, where the police and fire services talked to the kids about road safety.

BKW2018 O Save Life Gambia 7
In Serrekunda, The Gambia, Save Life Gambia partnered with Maarif Turkish International School, the police and the WHO Country Office to run Brake’s Kids Walk. Parents joined the schoolchildren on their walk around the community, engaging them with road safety messages and calling for better safety measures to keep them safe from traffic. They printed out posters and banners from the online action pack and delivered an assembly, inspiring the children to talk more to adults about how they can keep them safe.

This project is kindly sponsored by: Co op

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Cambridge MP wins prestigious award for outstanding contribution to road safety

15 January 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, has been given a prestigious national award for his successful campaign for widespread 20mph limits in his Cambridge constituency, to make roads safer and encourage more people to walk and cycle.

Julian received the 'Parliamentarian of the Year: Community Campaigner' award at road safety charity Brake's annual reception at the Houses of Parliament last night, sponsored by Direct Line Group (photo attached).

Julian's campaigning for safer roads for walking and cycling spans back to 2006, when as leader of the Liberal Democrats in Cambridgeshire County Council, he demanded the council reconsider its negative position on 20mph limits in light of Portsmouth's decision to implement widespread 20mph limits. After three years of campaigning, the council agreed to trial 20mph limits in small areas of Cambridge city centre.

In 2010, Julian led a committee of MPs, the All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Group (which he later joined as an MP), on a tour of Cambridge to show them the benefits of 20mph limits for cyclists. Shortly after this, Julian was elected as MP for Cambridge, and once again took up the mantle of campaigning for safer streets. He began calling for widespread 20mph limits across Cambridge, to make the entire city safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

In March 2013, Cambridge City Council announced it will implement 20mph limits on most residential and shopping streets, which will be phased in from January 2014. Read about the Council's plans.

Julian has been a vocal advocate of 20mph limits in the media as well as in Parliament, as co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cycling. The group's Get Britain Cycling report, published in 2013, called for 20mph limits to become the default on urban streets alongside a host of other measures to make streets safer and encourage greater levels of cycling.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Brake believes everyone has the right to walk or cycle safely, without fear from fast traffic, and we know that 20mph limits are a critical step towards this. By speaking out for walking and cycling, successfully campaigning for widespread 20mph limits in Cambridge, and raising awareness in media and Parliament about the benefits, Julian has brought this vision a little closer. We're delighted to be giving Julian recognition for his dedication to making streets safer for people to walk and cycle in Cambridge and the rest of the UK."

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, said: "I am delighted and honoured to have won this award from Brake. We do need to make roads much safer for people to walk and cycle, and 20mph limits will help to do that. I am really pleased that Cambridge City Council has taken such bold steps to make sure this becomes a reality."

Tim Ward, Cambridge City Executive Councillor for Planning and Transport, said: "A city-wide 20mph scheme has many potential benefits, including reducing the number of crashes, reducing congestion, and improving people's health as they feel more confident to cycle and to let their children cycle. Large scale 20mph schemes are the most cost-effective way of getting more people to cycle; the total cost of the Cambridge scheme is similar to that of re-designing one major road junction. Local residents have campaigned for years for small 20mph schemes, so I thought it best to meet this and future demand by implementing 20mph limits in residential streets across the whole city, which will work out cheaper than doing a handful of streets at a time."

Read about Brake's GO 20 campaign, calling for 20mph limits to be the norm in our cities, towns and villages.

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Direct Line Insurance Group plc (Direct Line Group) is headquartered in Bromley, Kent; it has operations in the UK, Germany and Italy.

Through its number of well known brands Direct Line Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include; Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. It also offers insurance services for third party brands through its Partnerships division. In the commercial sector, its NIG and Direct Line for Business operations provide insurance products for businesses via brokers or direct respectively.

In addition to insurance services, Direct Line Group continues to provide support and reassurance to millions of UK motorists through its Green Flag breakdown recovery service and TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery and telematics business.

Charity calls for safer streets for families, as survey reveals walking and cycling worries

Friday 26 September 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

The charity Brake and Churchill Insurance are appealing for safer streets for families, as their survey out today finds two thirds (64%) of the driving public think local roads are at least partially unsafe for families to walk and cycle. The findings come as thousands of tots across the country gear up to take part in Brake and Churchill's national road safety project for nurseries and pre-schools, Beep Beep! Day, as part of a campaign to save little lives.

Brake and Churchill's survey of 1,000 drivers also finds:

  • Almost one in six (16%) have had a near miss with someone on foot or bike in the past 12 months;
  • More than three in five (62%) themselves worry about being hit by traffic when they're on foot in their area.

As thousands of youngsters start learning about the risks on roads, Brake and Churchill are issuing an appeal to drivers to realise that children's safety is in their hands and join their movement to save little lives. In particular, they are highlighting that drivers can make a huge difference to the safety of families on foot and bike by slowing down to 20mph around nurseries, homes, schools and shops.

Beep Beep! Days involve children aged two to seven at pre-schools, nurseries, and children's centres learning the road safety basics through fun activities, and raising awareness among parents and drivers about keeping kids safe, using advice and resources from Brake. Most Beep Beep! Days happen in the autumn, and more than 32,500 children are registered to take part over the coming months. Nurseries can find out more and register at www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday

Concerns about family road safety are justified: traffic is the second biggest killer of children in the UK, and the biggest non-medical killer [1]. In 2013, 48 children were killed and 1,932 seriously injured on UK roads: that's five under-16s seriously hurt or killed each day [2]. The overwhelming majority of children killed or seriously injured on roads (83%) are on foot or bike [3].

As well as calling on drivers to slow down to help protect families, Brake is also campaigning for a safer road environment for kids and adults on foot and bike through its GO 20 campaign.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "It's vital we make our roads safer for families and people of all ages to walk and cycle, and drivers can help bring this about. It is unacceptable that five children are seriously injured or killed each day on our roads, and it is unacceptable to deny any child a healthy, active upbringing because of local dangers. Our survey reveals that drivers acknowledge the risks families face on roads – but we also need drivers to realise the difference they personally can made, and always drive as though a child could run out unexpectedly. As thousands of tots gear up to take part in a Beep Beep! Day this autumn, to start learning about dangers on roads, we're appealing to drivers everywhere to help reduce those dangers: slow down to 20mph in communities to help save little lives. We're also urging more pre-schools and nursery to register to be part of this important project."

Gus Park, director of Churchill Car Insurance, said: "We are very proud to be supporting Beep Beep! Day once again this year. Too many children die or are seriously injured on our roads each day. Beep Beep! Day is a great way of starting to educate young children on road safety, as well as raising awareness among drivers, including parents and grandparents, of the need to drive with extreme care when young children are about."

REGISTER! Nurseries, playgroups, childminders, infant schools and children's centres can sign up now to run a Beep Beep! Day and receive a FREE bumper resource pack, including posters, stickers and activity ideas. Go to www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday, call 01484 550061 or email beepbeep@brake.org.uk

About Beep Beep! Day
In 2013, 27,000 children took part in a Beep Beep! Day. Nurseries, playgroups, children's centres and childminders can run a Beep Beep! Day on whatever day is best for them, although most take place during the autumn, including many in Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014). Nurseries receive a pack of resources to help them run road safety activities and promote road safety to parents and the community.

Beep Beep! Days involve activities such as creating a poster of hand prints saying 'We hold hands', experimenting with toy cars to learn the words stop and go, and singing road safety songs. Activities are designed to help children to start understanding road safety, and to emphasise to parents and other adults their responsibilities in protecting children.

Sponsorship raised by children taking part helps Brake provide support services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes and run community road safety campaigns.

Advice for parents
When your child starts to walk with you around your community, talk to them about how they must always hold your hand. If your child is likely to pull away from you, use safety reins or a wrist strap. Hold hands until your child is at least eight, or longer depending on their development.

Make sure they understand the meaning of stop, traffic, danger, look, listen, walk don't run, and other key words. Encourage your child's nursery or playgroup to teach road safety through a Beep Beep! Day. Your child's learning will be more effective if they are taught about road safety at school as well as at home.

Full results
These results, released today (Thursday 11 September 2014), are from a survey of 1,000 drivers conducted by Surveygoo.

Q1. Do you think families in your local area are able to walk and cycle without being endangered by fast traffic?

  • Yes - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 36%
  • Partly - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in some parts of the local area: 57%
  • No - it is not safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 7%

Q2. In the past 12 months, have you had a near miss or collision with a pedestrian or cyclist, including where you've had to stop or swerve suddenly?

  • I have not hit someone, but I have had at least one near-miss: 13% (18% male, 10% female)
  • I bumped into someone but they weren't hurt: 2% (3% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they suffered minor injuries: 1% (1% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they had to go to hospital, but recovered: 0%
  • I hit someone and they suffered serious or long-term injury: 0%
  • I've been hit while on foot or bicycle myself: 3% (4% male, 3% female)
  • No, never: 82% (75% male, 86% female)

Q3. When you are on foot in your area, do you ever worry about being hit by traffic?

  • I worry every time I walk in my area: 4%
  • I worry often, but not every time: 10%
  • I worry occasionally: 48%
  • I never worry when walking: 34%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - it is too dangerous: 1%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - for other reasons: 3%

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Churchill
Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Churchill and UK Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc.
Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0800 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com

End notes
[1] Death registrations in England and Wales: table 2: deaths by age, sex and underlying cause, 2013 registrations, Office for National Statistics, 2014
[2] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 report, Department for Transport, 2014
[3] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 tables (table RAS30002), Department for Transport, 2014

Charity calls on employers: take advantage of technology to protect pedestrians and cyclists

Thursday 28 May 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

A report released today (28 May 2015) by Brake, the road safety charity, and Licence Bureau, has found many employers with vehicle fleets are not taking advantage of new technologies to protect vulnerable road users. Despite the potential to help drivers see pedestrians and cyclists and reduce casualties, only one in five HGV operators surveyed (20%) have rear-facing cameras on all vehicles, one in 12 (8%) have side-facing cameras on all vehicles, and one in eight (12%) have side sensors on all vehicles.

Brake is appealing to employers to follow best practice advice and implement the latest safety technology suitable for their vehicles, to protect other road users and deliver the business benefits of reduced crashes, bumps and scrapes and lower insurance premiums.

The report found HGV safety technologies that are mandatory under European law, such as underrun protection and wide-angle lenses, are present on almost all vehicles. Hence Brake is calling for more comprehensive regulation to ensure the widespread take up of technologies such as automatically moving mirrors, side-view cameras and side sensors, which can be of benefit in preventing needless death and injuries yet are currently only present on a minority of vehicle fleets.

With at least a quarter (24%) of road deaths and serious injuries involving a vehicle being driven for work [1], there is a clear need for employers to do more to improve the safety of their vehicles. HGVs specifically make up only 5% of vehicles on UK roads, yet are involved in a quarter (23%) of cyclist deaths and one in seven (13%) of pedestrian deaths. In 2013, 78 people on foot or bike were killed by HGVs.

The report also indicates that while safety management technologies such as telematics are becoming widespread, there is scope for employers with fleets of all vehicle types to make far greater use of them. Half of operators surveyed (49%) do not use telematics at all, and many of those who do report not making full use of their systems. Brake is highlighting that while there is an initial cost for such measures, effective safety technology like telematics pays for itself through reduced incidents and insurance premiums: many report recouping costs within a year and seeing long-term gains.

The report also highlighted the negative impact of certain forms of technology, particularly the worrying prevalence of hands-free mobile phone kits in employer vehicles. Hands-free kits were present in some, most or all vehicles in two thirds (68%) of HGV fleets and four in five (80%) cars fleets surveyed. Only 4% of employers make use of apps that prevent mobile phone use behind the wheel. Brake warns that using a mobile at the wheel, even with a hands-free kit, has a similar effect on reactions to drink driving [3], and makes you four times more likely to be in a crash that causes injury [4].

Employers can access Brake’s expert guidance by ordering a copy of the report, which includes advice for companies, and becoming a member of Brake Professional at http://www.brakepro.org/survey2015pt1

Dr Tom Fisher, senior research and communications officer at Brake, said: “Employers whose staff drive for work have a duty of care both to their own employees and other road users. While not a panacea, technology can play a big part in helping them improve safety and exercise that duty, so it is disappointing to see that so many are not taking full advantage of new safety technologies on offer. Blind spot devices and safety management kit like telematics have huge potential to reduce crashes and casualties, and bring down associated costs for the operator. Brake urges all fleet operators to go beyond the bare legal minimum to ensure their vehicles and drivers are as safe as possible, especially in safeguarding our most vulnerable road users. We can offer support and advice, through our Brake Professionals scheme, on how best to do this. Brake is also urging government to put in place more comprehensive minimum safety standards, as it is clear this is the most effective way to ensure the widespread adoption of vital safety technologies.”

Les Owen, compliance consultant at Licence Bureau, said: “The Brake survey provides fleet operators with lots of good data and advice. Surely it is obvious that the cost of a crash (average in the UK is over £800 for all vehicles) makes it sensible to consider fitting some of the safety technology items. The key features for fleets must be to avoid drivers using mobile phones; telematics to provide fleet managers with data they can sample (rather than look at every one) to offer driving advice where needed; and safety standard mirrors with items for HGVs to reduce risks to vulnerable road users. One serious crash or fatal collision can lead to a lifetime of problems for drivers and managers alike so doing more to avoid them is a no-brainer. Finally, implementing good policies, which are reviewed with drivers to provide learning opportunities and reminders of company objectives, is good practice. Writing a policy and not doing anything with it is just as bad as not having one.”

Brake’s advice for employers

Technology alone is not a panacea for road safety; safe driver behaviour and risk management policies and procedures are essential within fleets. Yet technology can form a vital part of the road risk management mix, and greatly aid safe driving, vehicles and journeys.

Fleet operators should be aware of and comply with laws to help protect vulnerable road users. Under EU law, trucks weighing more than 3.5 tonnes are legally required to have some safety devices fitted, including extra mirrors and under-run guards. Similar requirements exist in many other jurisdictions worldwide.

Where safety devices are not legally required, fleet managers should still consider fitting them to ensure their vehicles are as safe as possible.

Wide-angle and blind spot mirrors, CCTV, rear, front and side sensors, automatic side mirrors, and reversing alarms are available for various types of vehicle. Fleet operators should implement devices suitable to their vehicle types.

When selecting vehicles to lease or buy, or advising employees who use their own vehicles for work, fleet managers should select vehicles with smaller blind spots or blind spot-minimising technology fitted, and features designed to minimise the harm to vulnerable road users in a collision.

Fleet managers should keep up-to-date with the latest technology in this fast-moving area, and implement new technologies where available and appropriate. Information on the latest research and developments is available through Brake’s fortnightly Target Zero email newsletter tosubscribers, and in Brake’sresearch library.

Brake’s survey report gives further guidance and information on technology. Employers can order the report at http://www.brakepro.org/survey2015pt1.

Brake advises and supports companies to manage their road risk through itsBrake Professionals scheme. The survey report is available for free tomembers, or can be purchased for £5 by non-members. Special offer: the first 25 non-members to request the report through ouronline form get a copy for FREE.

About the report

The survey results come from Brake and Licence Bureau’s Fleet Safety Survey Report Part One: Technology, released today (Thursday 28 May 2015). 131 organisations that employ drivers completed the online survey, representing nearly 26,000 vehicles and 40,000 people driving for work.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on Twitter or Facebook. Follow Julie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014

[2] Ibid

[3]Using a hands-free mobile whilst driving can be more dangerous than drink driving, Transport Research Laboratory, 2009

[4]Role of mobile phones in motor vehicle crashes resulting in hospital attendance: a case-crossover study, University of Western Australia, 2005

Cycling routes and cyclist safety

sustainablethumbtext

Key facts

  • In Great Britain only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [1];
  • In 2015, there were 100 cycling fatalities and 3,239 cyclist serious injuries on the roads in Great Britain [2];
  • Transport accounts for a fifth (21%) of UK greenhouse gas emissions [3];
  • Physical inactivity accounts for one in six deaths in the UK [4];
  • Deaths due to physical inactivity are believed to cost the wider economy £7.4 billion; [5]
  • Almost three quarters of collisions with cyclists occur at a junction [6].

Introduction

Cycling is one of the healthiest, cheapest, most environmentally-friendly forms of transport available. Unfortunately, the UK lags behind many other countries when it comes to cycling levels. A study by the European Commission in 2010 found that just 2% of people aged 15 and over in the UK use a bicycle as their main form of transport – the seventh lowest level in Europe [7]. In Great Britain only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike. A survey of UK teenagers by Brake and insurer RSA Group found that one in four (23%) never cycle, and only 9% cycle weekly or more [8].

A lack of safe cycling routes may be a key reason for the lack of cycling in the UK. A survey of UK drivers by Brake and Direct Line indicated that almost four in 10 (39%) non-cyclists could be persuaded to cycle if there were more cycle routes and trails connecting their home to local facilities [9]. Sadly, cycling on roads continues to involve risk: in 2014, 100 cyclists were killed and 3,237 seriously injured in Great Britain [10].

The benefits of safer cycling

Making cycling safer can encourage more people to get about by bike, which benefits the environment and communities, by reducing the number of cars and harmful vehicle emissions. Transport accounts for a fifth (21%) of UK greenhouse gas emissions, with road transport making up the most significant proportion of this [11].

Increased cycling can also significantly improve people’s health. Currently, physical inactivity accounts for one in six deaths in the UK, with half of women and a third of men damaging their health due to lack of physical activity. Public Health England advises that over a week, people should carry out at least 150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate intensity activity, separated into periods of over ten minutes each [12]. Regular cycling is suggested by the NHS as a means to lose weight, reduce stress, reduce the likelihood of depression and improve fitness: an 80kg (12st 9lb) person will burn more than 650 calories with an hour’s riding [13]. Improved health from cycling would also benefit the economy; deaths due to physical inactivity are believed to cost the wider economy £7.4 billion [14].

Encouraging more people to cycle could also improve safety further due to fewer motor vehicles. Almost all road deaths and serious injuries are caused at least in part by the actions of drivers [15], so if individuals drive less or not at all it means they pose less danger to others. There is also some international evidence for the “safety in numbers” theory that more cyclists on the roads creates a safer environment for cyclists. For example, cycling in London increased 91% between 2000 and 2009, and cycle casualties fell 33% in the same period [16]. European data shows that countries with high levels of cycling, such as Norway and the Netherlands, have lower cyclist death rates [17]. This is thought to be down to factors including: drivers become more used to sharing the road with cyclists, so are more careful around them; drivers are more likely to be cyclists themselves, so understand cyclist behaviour; more people substitute cycling for driving, meaning fewer cars on the roads; and more people cycling means more political pressure to improve road conditions for cyclists.

Preventing cyclist deaths and serious injuries means preventing needless and acute human suffering and carries a significant economic benefit: every road death is estimated to cost the British economy £1.8 million, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance pay-outs, and human costs [18]. This means that in 2014, cyclist deaths alone cost Britain £180 million, alongside thousands of families having to face the horror and trauma of a bereavement or serious injury.

Take action: Make the Brake Pledge to minimise the amount you drive, or not drive at all, and get about by walking, cycling or public transport as much as possible.The Pledge also asks drivers to stay well within speed limits and go 20 or below around homes, schools and shops, to protect people on foot and bike.

Protecting cyclists

Evidence shows that taking a concerted approach to encouraging cycling does make a difference: the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany have far higher rates of cycling compared to the UK, across all sectors of society [19]. A developed cycling infrastructure makes cyclists safer; as one of the most important factors affecting cycling levels is people’s perceptions of cyclist safety [20], improving the infrastructure increases the number of cyclists.

Safe routes

Improving cycling infrastructure is a key way of making it safer to cycle. These routes should form networks that are useful, joining places where people live and work, as well as giving access to public transport.

The safest routes for cyclists are where cyclists are physically separated from motor traffic. A Canadian study found that cyclists on these routes have one ninth the risk of injury compared to a busy road with parked cars [21]. The impact of a well-designed cycle route can be dramatic, and benefit all road users: building a cycling route along Prospect Park West in New York City reduced crashes resulting in injury by 68%, plus far fewer cyclists rode on the pavement inconveniencing pedestrians, and travel times for drivers did not increase [22]. Shared-use paths are shared between pedestrians and cyclists. If properly designed, and wide enough for both to use comfortably, these can also be a safe option [23].  

On-road cycle lanes, where there is no physical separation between cyclists and fast-moving traffic, can be of limited benefit, especially if used in isolation without other steps to reduce risks and hazards for cyclists, such as junction improvements. These can be considered a quick and cheap option, yet in fact need to be designed as carefully as any piece of infrastructure. Transitioning from a cycle path and entering traffic can be dangerous, and any design has to take this into account.

With three-quarters of collisions with cyclists happening at junctions [24], any cycling infrastructure must be designed with junctions particularly in mind. Care and attention must be given by councils and traffic authorities for designing infrastructure that is properly designed and effective in preventing casualties.

Speed limits

Lowering traffic speeds is one of the key ways our communities and country roads can be made safer for people walking and cycling (read our fact pages on speed in the community and speed on country roads to learn more). This is crucial alongside having traffic-free routes, especially so people feel able to cycle around their own neighbourhoods. In 2015, 80% of cycling collisions occurred on a 30mph road [25], this is why Brake campaigns for the national default urban speed limit to be reduced to 20mph and for lower speeds on country roads.

Take action: Campaign in your community for 20mph limits by downloading our GO 20 toolkit and using our community campaign guide.

Vehicle design

Cyclists are particularly vulnerable at junctions: three quarters of collisions involving cyclists are at or near a junction [26].

While all drivers must take care to protect vulnerable road users, larger vehicles pose a particular risk when turning and manoeuvring as a result of their larger blind-spots. There are technologies that can reduce blind spots on these vehicles, including sensors, and CCTV systems. In London, the CLOCS scheme has set standards for construction vehicles in the capital for protecting cyclists.

Read more: Advice for protecting vulnerable road users for employers with staff who drive for work is available for members of Global Fleet Champions.


End notes

[1] National Travel Survey 2015, Department for Transport, 2016

[2] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2015, table RAS20006

[3] 2012 UK Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Department of Energy and Climate Change, 2014

[4] Working together to promote active travel: a briefing for local authorities, Public Health England, 2016

[5] Working together to promote active travel: a briefing for local authorities, Public Health England, 2016

[6] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016, table RAS20006

[7] Future of Transport: analytical report, European Commission, 2011

[8] Make streets safer for cycling to build on Tour de France fever, Brake and RSA, 2014

[9] Brake and Direct Line Report on Safe Driving: A Risky Business, Brake, 2011

[10] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013, Department for Transport, 2014

[11] 2012 UK Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Department of Energy and Climate Change, 2014

[12] Working together to promote active travel: a briefing for local authorities, Public Health England, 2016

[13] Benefits of cycling,NHS Choices, 2014

[14] Working together to promote active travel: a briefing for local authorities, Public Health England, 2016

[15] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016

[16] Safety in numbers in England, CTC, 2009

[17] Pedalling towards safety, European Transport Safety Council, 2012

[18] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016, table RAS60001

[19] Making Cycling Irresistible: Lessons from The  Netherlands, Denmark and Germany, Rutgers University, 2008

[20] The Dutch Reference Study: Cases of interventions in bicycle infrastructure reviewed in the framework of Bikeability, Delft Institute of Technology, 2011

[21] Route Infrastructure and the Risk of Injuries to Bicyclists: A Case-Crossover Study, University of British Columbia, 2012

[22] Prospect Park West Bicycle Path and Traffic Calming, New York City

[23] Guidance on shared-use paths, Gov.uk 

[24] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016, table RAS20006

[25] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016

[26] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016, table RAS20006

Updated August 2016

Giant Walking Bus 2013 - what happened

On 12 June 2013 tens of thousands of children from hundreds of primary schools across the UK marched for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that every school day 23 children are knocked down and hurt walking or cycling to or from school.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what schools did on the day and feedback, and see more pictures on our facebook page.

Read our full report on Giant Walking Bus 2013.

The Giant Walking Bus is at the heart of Brake’s campaign for slower speeds in communities to enable children and adults to walk and cycle without fear or threat. Brake used the event to get the message out through the media to drivers to slow down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops. Brake also appealed to local authorities across the UK to implement more 20mph limits and other measures to protect people, like safe pavements, paths and crossings. Find out more about our GO 20 campaign.

Read about our star schools from 2013

Whittle le Woods Chorley3Whittle-le-Woods Primary Schoolin Chorley took part in the Giant Walking Bus for the third time, and had another memorable day. The children made posters, banners and signs to take with them on their march, conducted a traffic survey and also tested their road safety knowledge and practised taking safe routes to school using homemade road signs and marked-out roads in their playground. The school has campaigned for a 20mph limit outside their school which is now in place but were keen to get the message out to drivers to stick to it. Their march was attended by the mayor of Chorley, who led the countdown to the march, and the local councillor, police officers and parents. Children taking part also kindly fundraised for Brake.The event generated a great deal of media interest, with regional tv and radio and two newspapers in attendance, speaking to teachers, parents and staff about why the march was so important.

Teaching assistant Jennifer Hall said: ‘We had a fantastic day and were supported by local police officers, the local councillor and the mayor of Chorley. All staff supported the event and we had some parents walking with us too – even the reporter from the radio station joined the bus with us!  Through previous road safety events we now have a 20mph limit outside our school so what we need now is for all to abide by it and this was a great way to get that message across.’

Dormers Wells Junior School in Southall, London, ran lots of activities alongside their march. They held an assembly, used PowerPoint presentations and YouTube videos to aid road safety discussions and also made placards and posters bearing road safety slogans and messages. The children were dressed in bright colours on the walk and held banners and chanted slogans including 'Slow down - kill your speed!', 'Kids say slow down' and 'What do we want? Safe roads!' The children also fundraised to support Brake's work as part of their event.

Hafren Junior School in Newtown, Powys, teamed up with nearby Abermule Primary School and extended their Giant Walking Bus to a distance of five miles, linking the event to their Healthy Schools activities and promoting the benefits of walking to the children. The children also raised more than £220 for Brake. In addition to encouraging local drivers to slow down in their community via the Giant Walking Bus, the school has also been actively involved in other road safety initiatives. Following an observational study of local traffic, conducted by pupils from nine local schools, Mid and West Wales Fire and Resue Service, Powsy Road Safety and Powys Police joined the schools in launching a campaign promoting road safety for children. A junior road safety forum was set up with pupils from all nine schools helping to think of ways to tackle local issues such as parents not using appropriate child restraints and local resdients driving too fast within the community, and they were joined by Brake's mascot Zak the Zebra to help them raise road safety awareness locally.

St Josephs RCVA Primary CoundonSt Joseph's RCVA Primary School and Victoria Lane Academy in Coundon, Bishop Auckland, teamed up to hold an extra large Giant Walking Bus event this year and get the message out to local drivers to take care and slow down around the local community. The children made their own posters and banners in advance of the big day, and took whistles and drums with them to give their march extra impact. They were also joined on the day by local PCSOs who helped to teach the children about being safe when out and about near roads and walked with the children on their march. The march also attracted the attention of the regional tv news and a local radio station, which both sent reporters and cameras along.

Mel Hutchinson, learning mentor at St Joseph's RCVA Primary school, said: 'The kids really loved it and the Giant Walking Bus has definitely become an annual event for us now.'

St Michael's Primary School in Figheldean in Wiltshire used the Giant Walking Bus as a focal point for their campaign to introduce 20mph limits throughout the village, to make it safer for children to walk and cycle to and from school. The school council planned activities for the day and before the march each class had lessons themed on road safety to explain the significance of cars slowing down near schools and how to keep safe when walking and cycling. Pupils also designed posters highlighting why 20mph limits are important and these were affixed to the perimeter fencing around the school to spread the message to the local community. Earlier in the year, the school ran a Bright Day for Brake to emphasise the need for drivers to slow down around schools and look out for cyclists and pedestrians, and children fundraised for Brake during both events.

All pupils from Bedford Drive Primary School in Birkenhead took part in this year's Giant Walking Bus event. Children from every class made banners and placards in advance of the big day to take with them on their march. Children from each year group marched together and came up with their own road safety-themed chants, including 'Twenty's plenty, forty's naughty' and 'Slow down, keep us safe'. The school also held a celebration assembly to share photos and videos from the day, congratulate the children on taking part and reinforce important road safety messages.

Teacher Mrs Elizabeth Finnigan said, 'All staff and children really enjoyed it. Local police officers commented on the great work of the children as they walked past, and cars beeped in support. A wonderful day!'

Market Drayton Primary ShropshireMarket Drayton Primary School in Shropshire once again took part in the Giant Walking Bus and organised another very successful event. Their march took them through the centre of Market Drayton and helped them to spread the important 'slow down' message to local residents. The children, dressed in hi-viz vests, designed 20mph banners and posters to take with them and were joined on the day by the deputy mayor and the local PCSO. Ahead of the march they were also visited by their local road safety officer who helped to run road safety lessons for the 180 children taking part in the march. Pupils also raised an amazing sum of £1,131 for Brake.

Rushy Meadow Primary School in Carshalton, Surrey, take part in the Giant Walking Bus each year. This year, the children made posters and banners to take with them on their march and children and teachers were interviewed by a local radio station about why it is important to get the message out to drivers to slow down around schools. Once again, children were sponsored to take part in the march and managed to raise nearly £1,500 to support Brake's work.

St Mark's Primary School in Barrhead, Glasgow, combined their Giant Walking Bus event with their annual health week and sports day. Junior Road Safety Officers planned and led a road safety assembly, parents came along to support and supervise the march and brought younger children along to join in. The head teacher also donned his hi-viz jacket to lead the march, using a megaphone to encourage children to chant 'slow down!' as they marched and also took a collection bucket with him to encourage donations from local residents and raised £236 for Brake. The school plans to make the Giant Walking Bus a fixture in their school calendar.

YESsmethick2Mill O'Forest Primary School in Aberdeentakes part in the Giant Walking Bus each year, and their event was covered by the local radio station for the first time. They went to great lengths to make it a big community event, by marching through the city and meeting up with pupils from two other schools to run a road safety quiz hosted by the local radio station. They made posters, banners and road signs to carry with them and were joined on the day by teachers, parents, local councillors, police officers and traffic wardens.

YESsmethwick - a partnership between Shireland Collegiate Academy and a group of primary schools in Smethwick in the West Midlands - co-ordinated a Giant Walking Bus event involving seven local schools. The student council, made up of two students from each school, organised the march and associated activities themselves. Children designed banners and placards to take with them on their march, focusing on a range of key road safety themes including 'GO 20'. They were joined by local police, road safety officers from Sandwell Council, representatives from ASDA supermarket, while parents and teachers helped to supervise the children. The giant march took the children on an extended 4-mile route through Smethwick town centre to ensure that the 'GO 20' message was spread to drivers right across the town.

Nearly 450 children from Long Meadow Primary School in Milton Keynes marched for safer roads in their community. They all took part in road safety lessons and assemblies ahead of the march, including having discussions about why it was so important and watching a road safety dvd and adverts. The school also received support from local PCSOs, who attended and helped supervise on the day. The children also managed to raise more than £500 for Brake as part of their event.

170 children from Marshside Primary School in Southport made banners to carry with them on their march for safer roads, and received a visit from the local road safety team to help teach them road safety lessons and explain the importance of drivers slowing down around the school. The school has taken part for three years and the Giant Walking Bus has become an annual event and has provided a focus for a local campaign to introduce 20mph limits. The School Travel Action Group has been actively involved in campaigning for lower limits alongside local councillors and were pleased to see 20mph zones extended in Southport with help from their efforts.

St Marys Primary Largs Ayrshire180 children from St Mary's Primary School in Largs, North Ayrshiredressed in hi-viz vests and designed banners and posters for their march in support of safer roads as part of their Giant Walking Bus event. They were joined by parents and teachers on their march around the town and local police were also on hand to provide support and supervision on the day. The children also managed to raise over £600 to support Brake's work.

Carr Green School Council in Brighouse, West Yorkshire, used the Giant Walking Bus as a focal point for spreading road safety messages to parents and local residents. Parking or driving on the pavements outside the school has been a serious issue, so the school council issued their own tickets on badly parked cars to remind local drivers to take care around the school. Alongside their march and road safety lessons for the children, the school also launched a new 'Walk on Wednesday' campaign to encourage parents to leave their cars at home and walk with children to school or park away from the school gates to help alleviate the parking and safety issues.

St Joseph's Catholic Primary School in Wandsworth, London, involved everyone, including nursery and reception children, in road safety activities as part of their Giant Walking Bus event. The school council took charge of planning activities in the lead-up to the event and on the day itself, including how to promote safety messages throughout the school and across the local community. The children designed 'slow down' banners for their march, while younger children took part in road safety lessons using ride-on toys, play roads and road signs, emphasising the importance of holding hands with an adult when near roads. Parents and other volunteers also joined in activities on the day.

Little Plumstead School Norfolk2Little Plumstead Primary School in Norwich were one of last year's standout schools. In 2013 the school held an informative road safety assembly, teaching children how to stay safe when out and about and highlighting why it is important for drivers to slow down around the school. All pupilsthen marched in a crocodile formation, with children holding hands and chanting.The children made posters to wave during the march and local police officers came along to show their support. Each child was sponsored to take part and raised a fantastic  sum of£1,391 for Brake.

Nicky Lingley, teaching assistant, said “We thoroughly enjoyed taking part in Brake's Giant Walking Bus again. The march gave our children a voice, helping them tell drivers to slow down and look out for people on foot. We were very pleased with how the event went and have been overwhelmed by the amount of money that the children have raised given the size of our school.”

Braywood CE Primary School in Windsor took vuvuzelas and whistles with them on their march to help them get their road safety message across to local drivers, and the children also designed their own posters and wore high-viz vests as they marched. The school encouraged parents to get involved, with many of them coming along to help support and supervise activities on the day, and helped to create a community charter around staying safe near roads. The children also raised £148 for Brake.

West Ham Church School in London organised a range of road safety activities alongside their walking bus, to help teach the children important road safety lessons and also to encourage parents to take on board the key messages from the march. Junior Road Safety Officers organised a Green Cross Code quiz for pupils, and the local lollipop lady and police force supported the event by coming to the school to help teach lessons. The school also held a special road safety-themed coffee morning for parents to explain the reasons behind the march and to raise awareness about both road safety and Brake's important work supporting bereaved families and campaigning for safer roads. Early Years Foundation Stage children also took part in their own 'big toddle' for road safety the following week, and pupils across all years contributed to raising a total of nearly £300 for Brake.

Central Park Primary School East Ham2Central Park Primary School in East London ran a host of road safety activities for their Giant Walking Bus. Class assemblies and PHSCE lessons were road-safety themed, with the children watching videos and being encouraged to think about the roads close to the school and what can be done to make it safer for everyone. Throughout the year the school council and teachers have been monitoring parking outside the school each day and are working with the council to try and address parking problems. The children also managed to raise more than £500 to support Brake's work.

Claire Rozzier, teacher and sustainability lead, said: The day went really well. We have taken part for quite a number of years now and the children are able to understand and talk about why we are doing it and the importance of road safety and relate it to everyday life. The children especially enjoyed wearing the stickers and holding banners, which was something we have not done before.'

Alveston C of E Primary School in Stratford upon Avon ran a range of activities in the build-up to their march for safer roads, aimed at teaching the children road safety lessons and getting the message out to parents and other local drivers to take care and reduce their speed around the community. Teachers and pupils came up with plenty of ways to help raise awareness, including designing banners and posters, coming up with road safety songs and even raps, having discussions about the importance of safety during lessons and assembliesand issued letters about the event to parents to explain the importance of the march. The children also raised nearly £120 for Brake.

Manor Beach Primary School in Thornton-Cleveleys, Lancashire, took part in the Giant Walking Bus for the first time in 2013. Nearly 300 children, plus teachers and other volunteers, donned their hi-viz vests and joined the march for safer roads. Local PCSOs also came along to deliver a road safety assembly and accompany the children on their march, and each class had additional road safety lessons and made banners to take along with them. The school also used the event to teach the children about healthy lifestyles and eco-friendly transport and to launch their own walking bus scheme to be introduced in September. The children also managed to raise £332 for Brake.

Rokesly Infant School LondonRokesly Infant School in Hornsey, London, were joined for their march by Mr Crocodile, the local council's Walking Mascot. The local Safer Neighbourhood team also joined the walk, as did many parents. Before the big day, the students worked with a local professional musician to compose a song about road safety and sustainable travel, to be used as part of their road safety lessons and activities on the day. The children also raised more than £800 for Brake.

Acting headteacher Karren Hughes said, 'The walk was very successful with a good turnout of parents to support and supervise the children. Mr Crocodile really added an extra element of fun to the day. The Giant Walking Bus is a good way for us to raise awareness of road safety and remind drivers in the area about safety issues around our school.'

A special thank you too, to the following schools that managed to raise more than £500 for Brake as part of their Giant Walking Bus event:

Thornaby Village Primary School in Stockton-on-Tees

Netherton Church of England Primary School in Dudley

Lionel Primary School in Hounslow, London

St Monica's Catholic Primary School in Milton Keynes

Ilsham Academy in Torquay

Introduction to school crossing patrols

Key facts

  • Between 2010 and 2014, there was a cut in numbers of lollipop people of at least 992 [1];
  • 46% of children aged five to 10 years, and 38% of those aged 11 to 16, walk to school, although these numbers are in decline as more and more children are driven to school [2];
  • In 2015, 1,283 children on foot were killed or seriously injured on Great Britain’s roads [3], 511 of these in the morning or evening of a school-day [4]

Introduction

School crossing patrols (or lollipop people) provide a vital service by helping children cross roads safely on their way to school as part of a broader provision of safe crossing facilities by local authorities. Yet lollipop people numbers are declining: between 2010 and 2014, there was a cut in numbers of lollipop people of at least 992 [5].

46% of children aged five to 10 years, and 38% of those aged 11 to 16, walk to school, although these numbers are in decline as more and more children are driven to school [6]. The danger on our roads discourages parents from choosing to let their children walk or cycle to school. Even though the numbers of children killed on our roads is decline, in 2014, 1,283 children on foot were killed or seriously injured on Great Britain’s roads [7], 511 of these in the morning or evening of a school-day [8].

Take action: Support Brake’s GO 20 campaign for slower speeds in towns, cities and villages, and Brake’s rural roads not racetracks campaign for slower speeds on country roads.

Local authorities

Local authorities have a duty to promote the use of sustainable transport, including for children on their way to school [9]. The first official lollipop people were introduced in the 1950s [10]. Lollipop people are appointed by the county council, the metropolitan district council, or in London the Metropolitan Police [11]. It is the law that drivers have to stop for a lollipop person when they indicate traffic to stop, and since 2001 they have had the power to help both children and adults to cross the road [12].  

There are many ways of making sure our children can walk and cycle safely to school. Slowing down traffic, for example by establishing 20mph limits, is a powerful way to make their journeys safer [13]. Yet lollipop people retain a key role to play in making our streets safer, not least as they offer a friendly face that encourages active and sustainable travel.

Take our interactive quiz on 20mph limits

End notes 

[1] ITV news, “Are cuts in lollipop lady number putting our children at risk?”, 2014

[2] National Travel Survey 2014: Travel to school, Department for Transport, 2015

[3] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual Report 2015, Table RAS30016, Department for Transport, 2016

[4] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Table RAS30030, Department for Transport, 2016

[5] ITV news (2014) “Are cuts in lollipop lady number putting our children at risk?”

[6] National Travel Survey 2014: Travel to school, Department for Transport, 2015

[7] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual Report 2015, Table RAS30016, Department for Transport, 2016

[8] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Table RAS30030, Department for Transport, 2016

[9] Home to school travel and transport guidance: Statutory guidance for local authorities, Department for Transport, 2014

[10] Moran, J., “Crossing the road in Britain 1931-1976”, 2006, The Historical Journal49(2) pp.477-496

[11] RoSPA, School Crossing Patrol Service Guidelines, 2012

[12] Traffic at 30mph is too fast for children’s visual capabilities, University of Royal Holloway London, 2010

[13] See Brake’s Go 20 campaign for 20mph limits where people walk, shop and go to school.


Page last updated: January 2016