Articles Tagged ‘place for people - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake publishes report on road safety and sustainability on the SRN

News from Brake
Wednesday 16 May 2018
 
Brake, the road safety charity, has published a report on road safety and sustainability on England’s Strategic Road Network (SRN). This report is timely, published ahead of the funding decision on Highways England’s Road Investment Strategy 2 (RIS2) for 2020 [1], and sets out Brake’s view of the urgent need for prioritisation of safety and sustainability on the SRN.
 
The report makes ten recommendations for RIS2, including:
  • RIS2 must have safety and the environment as ‘equal first’ priorities. Funding must be centred around the needs to stop casualties and have clean air.
  • RIS2 can expedite the establishment of an independent road collision investigation branch.
  • RIS2 must provide comprehensive funding for enforcement. Traffic enforcement tackles many causes of road casualties.
Commenting on the publication, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said: “Roads investment decisions affect us all; every death on our roads is a preventable tragedy and the environmental impacts of roads reach far and wide. The second Roads Investment Strategy (RIS2) is a huge opportunity to shift the dial on UK road safety and sustainability, with billions of pounds of investment to be allocated, so it is vital that the right choices are made. Brake wants to see safety and sustainability as equal first priorities for our strategic roads and we urge Highways England to listen and take on board the recommendations detailed in this important report.”
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors
 
Brake report on Road safety and sustainability on England’s Strategic Road Network available online here.
 
[1] The first Road investment strategy (RIS1) covered investment in England’s motorways and major roads (the ‘Strategic Road Network’) during the 2015 to 2020 road period. This was the initial step in a long-term programme to improve England’s motorways and major roads. The process is repeatable and work is now underway to develop the second RIS — known as RIS2 — covering the second road period post 2020. The second RIS (RIS2) will cover the financial years 2020/21 to 2024/25.
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Drivers call for investment in segregated cycle routes

News from Brake
Thursday, 8 March 2018
news@brake.org.uk
 
The UK’s single-carriageway A roads are not fit for cyclists and building segregated cycle routes should be the Government’s priority for roads investment, a surveyof over 1,000 drivers for Brake and Direct Line has found [1].
 
Drivers have stated that the 60mph speed limit on single-carriageway A roads is too fast to assure the safety of cyclists and that both the warning signs and space available for cyclists are inadequate. This sense of risk is echoed by the overwhelming majority of survey respondents stating that they would advise children or teenagers never to cycle on single-carriageway A roads or only to cycle with an adult.
 
Drivers have called on the Government to address these concerns by prioritising investment on building segregated, tarmacked cycle paths alongside the single-carriageway A road network, over and above any expansion of the road itself. Brake and Direct Line’s survey finds that such investment would significantly increase the numbers of those cycling, as whilst 70 per cent of drivers state that they currently never cycle on single-carriageway A roads, more than half state that they would be persuaded to if there was a demarcated space for cyclists.
 
The Government is currently consulting on billions of pounds of investment in both the Strategic Road Network [2] and the Major Road Network [3]. Every road death is a preventable tragedy and the Government must focus investment on delivering safe, sustainable transport options across the UK.
 
Joshua Harris, Brake’s director of campaigns, said: “Getting more people cycling is a win-win for the Government, delivering both personal and public health benefits. Contrary to popular opinion, our survey shows that the majority of drivers are willing to switch modes and cycle if safe facilities are available. We echo the call from drivers and urge the Government to prioritise investment in safe, segregated cycle routes in the upcoming Road Investment Strategy.”
 
Gus Park, managing director of motor insurance at Direct Line, said: “All road users should be able to undertake their journeys safely.  Many who would cycle, choose to drive instead as they feel some roads are just not safe enough for them to use. Single-carriageway A roads are vital arteries within our road infrastructure, but they need to ensure they can accommodate all road users regardless of their preferred method of transport now and in the future.”
 
 [ENDS]
 
For further information please contact: Joshua Harris, director of campaigns, Brake
 
Notes to editors: 
 
[1] Full survey data available in Brake and Direct Line report “Our Strategic Road Network - PT. 1: Safe roads between places”, with key survey excerpts detailed below.
 
  
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.  We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 
About Direct Line
Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or online.
Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. UK Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.
Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0845 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com.
 
Survey excerpts:
 
  1. 60mph speed limits are too fast to assure the safety of cyclists on single-carriageway A roads

Strongly agree

25.46 %

251

Agree

32.96 %

325

Neither agree nor disagree

25.56 %

252

Disagree

12.37 %

122

Strongly disagree

3.65 %

36

 
 
  1. Warning signs telling drivers to look out for cyclists don’t help protect cyclists on bendy single carriageway A roads

Strongly agree

27.38 %

270

Agree

41.18 %

406

Neither agree nor disagree

23.83 %

235

Disagree

6.19 %

61

Strongly disagree

1.42 %

14

 
 
 
  1. There is not enough space for cyclists on single-carriageway A roads

Strongly agree

33.06 %

326

Agree

41.28 %

407

Neither agree nor disagree

19.88 %

196

Disagree

4.56 %

45

Strongly disagree

1.22 %

12

 
  1. What, if anything, do you tell your children/teenagers about cycling on single-carriageway A roads?

I tell them these roads are dangerous and warn them not to cycle on these roads ever

116

I tell them these roads are dangerous and warn them to only cycle on these roads with me or another adult

115

I tell them these roads are dangerous and tell them to take care on these roads

124

I tell them it is safe to cycle on these roads

20

I don't talk to them about cycling on single-carriageway A roads

25

Other

6

  1. If you were the Government, and you had a limited amount of money to spend on improving single-carriageway A roads, which of the following would you prioritise?

Providing segregated cycle paths, made of tarmac, separated from the road by a large and raised kerb or a grass verge, or following an entirely different route (to reduce traffic and emissions and enable healthy cycling)

53.25 %

525

Making them dual carriageways with central reservations and crash barriers (to give similar safety standards for vehicle occupants as on motorways, and increased space for vehicles)

24.95 %

246

Neither of the above - I wouldn't change single-carriageway A roads

21.81 %

215

 
  1. Do you ever choose to cycle instead of driving on single-carriageway A roads?

Yes – frequently (I cycle on single-carriageway A roads more often than I drive on them)

6.49 %

64

Yes - often (I cycle on single-carriageway A roads about the same number of times as I drive on them)

7.30 %

72

Yes – sometimes (I drive on single-carriageway A roads more often than I cycle on them)

10.04 %

99

Yes – very infrequently (I hardly ever cycle on single-carriageway A roads)

6.09 %

60

No – I never cycle on single-carriageway A roads

70.08 %

691

  1. Which of the following improvements would persuade you to consider cycling more often, or at all, on the single-carriageway A roads that you use?

A well-maintained tarmac path for cyclists, separated from the road by a large and raised kerb or a grass verge, or following a different but equally direct route

35.09 %

346

A wider road with a painted line on it to mark a cycle lane from the lane for motorised traffic

18.15 %

179

Nothing - I would never cycle on a single-carriageway A road

46.75 %

461

Place for People

Campaigning to give people space to move in ways that are safe, green, healthy and fair

Roads were first paved for people walking and cycling, not for vehicles. Since the invention of the car, space has been increasingly robbed for motorised vehicles, meaning people have often been forced to the sidelines, facing danger, becoming casualties and breathing polluted air when trying to move around their communities and between places.

Around the world, the Liveable Cities movement (which calls for cities for people) and Vision Zero movement (which calls for an end to road casualties) are gaining momentum. The United Nations New Urban Agenda (signed in November 2016) included powerful declarations in support of these movements. Cities are starting to change, including here in the UK, but the speed of change needs to increase.    

What are we calling for?

  • city and town planners to transform where we live into "liveable" space, prioritising and enabling the needs of people on foot and bicycles through segregated and prioritised space, and ensuring traffic speeds are reduced and public transport made accessible. 
  • restrictions on the types of large vehicles we allow in our towns and cities. Trucks and buses must have good direct vision (driver is able to see more around their vehicle to enable them to see people on foot, bicycles and motorcycles) and indirect vision (mirrors and cameras). High-polluting vehicles must be banned as part of ultra-low emission zones. 
  • our towns, cities and road networks to be fitted with accessible refuelling points for ultra-low emission vehicles. 
  • a comprehensive network of segregated routes for cyclists between places, as part of the modernisation of our Strategic Road Network (A roads and motorways). Cycling is a fast mode of transport but carries high risks on rural roads, particularly ones with high speeds.
  • the needs of motorcyclists to be considered centrally by planners; they are also vulnerable road users and often hit at junctions in towns and cities and on high speed rural roads. A significant number of casualties on our roads are motorcyclists. 
  • development of automated vehicles with the needs of people on foot and bicycles prioritised. Automation must not result in reduction of space for walking or cycling, loss of public transport, increase in pollution or increased risk for people. 

 

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