Articles Tagged ‘public transport - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake and First Group

Brake have supported First Group with a number of community engagement events with the aim of putting road safety as a top priority for both First bus drivers and passengers. 
Brake and First ran an exchanging places event in the centre of Media City in Salford. The idea behind this was to develop an understanding between First bus drivers and cyclists in Manchester. The cyclists were asked to sit in the cab of the bus and were made aware of the blind spots.With the support of Brake, First have also ran a number of community events. First have been out and about in various city centres throughout the partnership including Sheffield, Manchester, Leeds, York and Rotherham to promote their commitment to road safety.
Brake have also facilitated a number of school visits for First's community engagement teams to educate pupils on Road Safety.  Within the partnership, First also invited their staff to attend breakfast briefings with the aim of highlighting awareness of vulnerable road users. Through posters and presentations, First stressed the important role drivers have in ensuring pedestrians and cyclists can use the roads safely. 

RSW theme and bus 6

 

 

Brake launches ‘Drive less, live more’ interactive resource to reduce car journeys and make streets safer in the run up to Road Safety Week

Wednesday 4th November
Contact e:
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive resource in the lead up to Road Safety Week 23–29 November 2015, with the theme'Drive less, live more'. Developed in partnership with AIG and Specsavers, the resource encourages everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by reducing car journeys and walking, cycling or using public transport instead.

Every day five people die on UK roads, and over 60 are seriously injured – resulting in needless devastation, trauma and suffering1. The vast majority of casualties are down to driver error. Road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are crucial. It’s about doing what we can to protect ourselves and the people around us to make our streets safer. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all.

Many people walk the few metres from their front door to the car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A shocking four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles2. Brake is asking everyone this Road Safety Week to consider how they use roads, and pledge to leave their car at home, at least for some journeys.

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only makes our streets safer by reducing traffic danger, but has personal benefits too. It can save money in car costs; help people live more active lives; reduce stress and illness; reinvigorate communities; and cut congestion and pollution.

The open-access‘Drive less, live more’ resource can be used to facilitate discussion about the importance of driving less. It can be used by anyone who works with drivers, including: fleet professionals and employers; driving instructors; road safety professionals and emergency services; teachers; community leaders; and by individuals directly wanting to see how they can help themselves and their community by driving less. Brake is especially encouraging families to use theDrive less, live more resource to reduce school-run and commuter traffic, and asking businesses to manage at-work journeys.

Access the resource online now atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessinteractive.

Gary Rae, Director of Communications and Campaigns, said: Our new ‘Drive less, live more’ e-learning resource shows people the benefits of walking, cycling or taking public transport, particularly for shorter journeys. The resource is a powerful tool that shows that by driving less, you can improve road safety and prevent casualties, become more active, and protect the planet. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, employers, driving instructors and educators to help them raise awareness of the benefits of active and sustainable transport.”

The facts

By 2035 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 45% and traffic delays by 64%3.

Four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles – short enough to replace with a pleasant walk or cycle ride. Currently, one in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of our children are driven to school4, even though the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles5.

One in four adults in England is obese and a further 37% are overweight6. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year7. Incorporating activity like walking and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight8, and can help guard against serious illnesses such as asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers9.

Commuting by public transport can also improve overall fitness. People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have been shown to have a lower BMI and a healthier bodyweight10.

Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs11. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling12.

Groups can register to take part atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors Specsavers and AIG.

The theme of Road Safety Week 2015, 23-29 November, is about making our roads and communities safer, happier places for everyone, by encouraging people to‘Drive less, live more’.

Brake has been running this successful event for 17 years, growing its reach and impact. We now share our experience globally atwww.roadsafetyweek.org, to help others run Road Safety Weeks and similar events in other countries.

Five people die every day on UK roads and around 60 are seriously injured. Brake’s priority is tackling these devastating tragedies, and making our streets safe for people to use without fear or threat. Reducing traffic is an important part of this.

Brake’s main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or the BrakeBlog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2010

[3] Road Transport Forecasts 2011, Department for Transport, 2011

[4] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[5] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[6] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, 2013 NHS, 2013

[7] Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, et al., ‘Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd Ed)’, Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[8] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[9] NHShttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx, 2015

[10] Flint Ellen, Cummins Steven, Sacker Amanda, ‘Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index:  population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom’, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[11] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[12] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Brake welcomes Government’s bold vision for the future of transport in the UK

News from Brake
Friday 27 March 2020
 
Transport Secretary, Grant Shapps MP, has said that public transport and active travel should be the first choice for moving around in future and that people should use their cars less to tackle climate change.
 
The comments come in the foreword of the Government’s Decarbonising Transport document and mark a significant step change in the Government’s thinking towards the future of transport in the UK.
 
Road safety campaigners, Brake, have long been calling for active travel and public transport to be the main way that people should move around as part of their vision for safe and healthy mobility.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake said: “This is fantastic news. Everyone should be able to move in safe and healthy ways and its heartening to hear of the Government’s step change focussing on reducing car use – it has great potential to reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on our roads, as well as improve people’s health. We now need to see greater investment in active travel, such as more segregated cycle paths and foot paths, to make this vision a reality.” 
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:

Leeds North West MP wins national road safety award

News from Brake
news@brake.org.uk      
Wednesday 9 October 2019
 
Alex Sobel, MP for Leeds North West, has today been named road safety parliamentarian of the month for September by Brake, the road safety charity, and Direct Line Group. The award recognises Alex’s attempt to kick start action to improve the way his constituents can move around in safe and healthy ways, with the launch of his transport strategy for Leeds North West.
 
The strategy sets out four key strategic principles for the future of transport in the city. It recommends that any future transport infrastructure changes should focus on promoting public transport, cycling and walking, promoting environmental sustainability, improving the local economy and benefiting public health both physical and mental.
 
Alex created these strategic principles to start the conversation about what can be done about his constituency’s creaking transport infrastructure. They are intended to ensure proper investment in the transport network based on a comprehensive strategy.
 
Road safety charity, Brake, are also calling for the transformation of urban transport nationwide, enabling people to move around in safe and healthy ways with priority given to getting around by bicycle, on foot or by affordable public transport. The safety campaigners want to see significantly increased investment in cycling and walking infrastructure, safer default speed limits (20mph in urban areas), and public transport made more accessible and affordable.
 
Commenting, director of campaigns for Brake, Joshua Harris said:“I am delighted to name Alex as this month’s road safety parliamentarian award winner. His transport strategy is a bold attempt to change the way transport infrastructure is discussed and focus on promoting safe and healthy forms of getting around, such as cycling, walking and affordable public transport, which will be of great benefit to his constituents.
 
“We should all be free to move around in safe and healthy ways, and it’s time to transform our urban areas so that the needs of people come first. More and safer routes for people walking and cycling alongside slower vehicle speeds are vital to help make our cities more safe and healthy places to be.”
 
MP for Leeds North West, Alex Sobel said:“I am grateful to Brake, a wonderful charity that does fantastic work promoting safe sustainable transport, and Direct Line Group for this award. The strategy is a first step in ensuring that we have a sustainable, grassroots approach to fixing transport in our city region. I am looking forward to continuing engagement with my communities around how we develop these strategies into positive action. I will be in Otley on Thursday to do this with residents there and will have several more events to look out for. It is wonderful to receive recognition for the work that we are doing in Leeds North West but the real reward will come when we see a sustainable and safe transport network come to fruition.”
 
Gus Park, Managing Director of Motor, Pricing and Underwriting at Direct Line Group, said: “We are very pleased that Alex Sobel has been selected as the Road Safety Parliamentarian of the month for the launch of his transport strategy for Leeds North West. This is a significant step towards ensuring that the future transport infrastructure in his constituency aligns with the needs of local residents and road users.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.
 
About Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Direct Line Group is headquartered in Bromley. Through its number of well known brands the Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. The Group also provides insurance services for third parties through its partnerships division, Direct Line Group Partnerships. In the commercial sector, the Group's NIG and Direct Line for Business operations offer insurance products for businesses distributed through brokers or direct, respectively.

Nicky Morgan, MP for Loughborough, February 2012

nicky morgan_mpLoughborough MP Nicky Morgan has been awarded a Road Safety Parliamentarian of the Month Award for her campaign to improve school transport by road safety charity Brake and Direct Line.

In 2011 Leicestershire County Council withdrew a bus service taking pupils from Sileby and Mountsorrel to Humphrey Perkins School in Barrow upon Soar. This decision was made despite the head teacher, parents and pupils arguing the route is unsafe to walk.

This encouraged Nicky to start a campaign for better school transport nationwide, calling on the government to review whether legislation and government guidance adequately protects children on their way to school. In November Nicky asked a questionin Parliament and the Education Minister confirmed local authorities have a duty to provide transport to school when the walking route is unsafe, but recognised there were unresolved issues in school transport for Humphrey Perkins School.

In January Nicky led a debatein Parliament on the issue. The Education Minister agreed improvements to school transport policy were needed, promising to consider putting in place a robust appeals procedure so parents can challenge school transport policy at local level.

Nicky argues it is time for a common sense approach to school transport with authorities considering the needs of families. She secured media coverage and support in her constituency and vows not to give up until necessary improvements are made to safeguard children at Humphrey Perkins School, and schools around the country.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, said: "As a charity that supports road crash victims we know only too well the appalling suffering caused by the death or injury of a child. We must do more to prevent these tragedies, and to enable children to travel safely to school and in their local community without their lives being endangered. We are backing Nicky's campaign to ensure local authorities deliver on their responsibilities to ensure there are safe routes for children to walk or cycle, or sustainable alternatives like safe, modern buses."

Nicky Morgan MP said: "Our local authorities are having to make tough spending decisions as the Government deals with the deficit but there are some changes in services that have potentially devastating consequences. There can surely be no point in standing by whilst savings made by local authorities increase costs to the tax payer elsewhere due to possible hospital costs to an injured child, extra benefit payments because parent can't work due to the time it takes to get their child to and from school and lost tax receipts as parents can't continue in their job or have to choose not to go back to work. The real objection in my constituency case arose from the view of the Council that the proposed walking route is safe and the strongly held view of almost everyone else that it is not. I continue to work with constituents and local councillors to make the case on this matter."

Public transport safety

sustainablethumbtextPublic transport is one of the safest and most sustainable ways to travel. Bus or coach travel in Britain resulted in 0.2 deaths per billion km over the last decade, and rail travel effectively zero (as deaths from rail travel are so rare they do not show up in this measurement). By comparison, car travel kills 1.3 passengers, and 2.3 drivers, per billion km [1].

However, it is still important to look out for your own safety when using public transport. This is particularly important for bus and coach passengers – buses and coaches may be safer than other vehicles, but they are still operating in an unpredictable environment, on public roads. This page looks at some of the risks involved in public transport use and how these can be reduced.

Learn more:Read our fact page on sustainable and active travel, and the benefits of increasing this.

Seat belts

Seat belts keep you in your seat if you are involved in a crash, and massively reduce the chance of serious injury and death. In a crash, you are twice as likely to die if you are not wearing a seat belt [2]. If the vehicle you are in has seat belts fitted, you are required by law to use them [3]. Three-point seat belts offer far greater protection than lap belts, particularly for children [4].

In the UK, all coaches and minibuses registered on or after 1 October 2001 must have forward-facing or rearward-facing seat belts fitted. Older coaches and minibuses that are transporting three or more children must have a forward-facing seat belt, either three-point or a lap belt, fitted for each child [5].

In the UK, passengers aged 14 and over are personally responsible for belting up. The driver is legally responsible for ensuring that younger children are using seat belts or appropriate child restraints. However, as the driver needs to concentrate on the road, Brake advises that a second adult travels in coaches carrying children and takes responsibility for supervising seat belt use, so the driver is not distracted.

Learn more: Read our fact page on seat belts and crash protection.
Take action:Make the Brake Pledge to belt up on every journey, and make sure everyone else in the vehicle does too.

Buses without seat belts

Buses designed for urban use with standing passengers are not required to have seat belts [6]. It is therefore vital that passengers take care on these vehicles. Always sit if a seat is available; if no seats are available, make sure you can reach a hand rail to hold on to. If standing, keep a safe distance from the doors and the driver, and do not stand on the top deck or stairs on double-deckers. Never lean on the doors or emergency exits as this could cause them to open while the vehicle is moving. When reaching your stop, stay seated until the bus has come to a halt.

Hiring minibuses and coaches

Some coaches and minibuses are only fitted with lap belts, which are not as safe. If hiring a coach or minibus, insist on one with three point belts.

If carrying children under 150cm tall, also insist on a vehicle that has seats that are appropriate to use with child seats fitted. Parents should be advised to bring their child’s child seat and ‘fit and sit’ their child in the seat before the journey. Children are only safe in vehicles if they are in a child restraint for their size and weight, appropriately fitted using the seat belt.

Learn more: Read our advice for schools on safe school trips.
Learn more: Read our fact page on child restraints.

School bus safety

If children are travelling to school on public buses, they should be taught to keep themselves safe by queuing sensibly for the bus, well back on the pavement, and staying in their seats or well back from doors and stairs if they have to stand. They should be taught to respect the driver and other passengers by behaving sensibly, keeping conversations quiet and calm, and not horsing around or otherwise distracting the driver.

If your child’s school has or hires minibuses or coaches to transport pupils to and from school or on school trips, ask to see their specifications for hiring or purchasing vehicles. Insist that the school uses modern vehicles with three-point seat belts fitted, and that they have adequate checks in place for maintaining and repairing these vehicles. See our advice for schools on safe school trips and transport.

Take action:Read our guide for schools on teaching and promoting road safety.

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2013, Department for Transport, 2014, tables RAS53001 and RAS30013

[2] Seatbelts: the facts, THINK!, undated

[3] Seat belts: the law, gov.uk, 2014

[4] Crash protection for child passengers: a review of best practice, University of Michigan Transport Research Institute, 2000

[5] Seat belt law: minibuses and coaches, RoSPA, 2005

[6] The law: Other Vehicles (Buses, Coaches and Minibuses), childcarseats.org.uk, 2014


Page last updated: September 2014

Sober enough to read this?

Charity appeals to drivers: not a drop, not a drag this festive season, as police crackdown starts

Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on drivers to stay sober if driving over the Christmas period – not a drop, not a drag – or plan to get home by taxi or public transport, to prevent devastating casualties.

Brake is renewing calls for a zero tolerance drink drive limit of 20mg alcohol per 100ml of blood, in line with evidence that even one drink dramatically increases crash risk and to send a clear message it should be none for the road. A blood alcohol level of 20-50mg increases your likelihood of crashing three-fold. The call comes on the back of a recent survey by Brake and Direct Line which showed that more than three-quarters of drivers thought the current drink-drive limit too high.

The Scottish Government introduced a lower limit of 50mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood, on 5th December 2014. The rest of the UK still retains a 80mg limit – higher than all other EU countries except Malta. Road Safety Scotland launched their drink-drive campaign this month.

Gary Rae, campaigns director for Brake, the road safety charity, said: “As a charity that supports bereaved and injured road crash victims, we witness the suffering that drink and drug driving inflict, and appeal to everyone to help put a stop to it. We support the message put out by the Scottish Government and think it applies to the whole of the UK. If you’re driving home from celebrations this festive season, it’s vital you take your responsibility for people’s safety seriously, and stay completely off booze and drugs. It’s a fact that even small amounts of alcohol or drugs increase your risk of crashing.

“We are calling on the Westminster government to take action on drink driving. We have the highest drink-drive limit in Europe, sending out the dreadful message that a drink or two before driving is acceptable. We welcome the lower limit in Scotland as a positive stepping stone towards zero tolerance. The evidence shows that a tough approach helps prevent casualties.”

Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins from Police Scotland said: “Between December last year and January 2016, 452 drivers failed a breath test. It’s really disappointing that so many people were prepared to cause danger to others as well as themselves. “We are urging people to plan ahead during the party season. Think about how you’re going to get home - before you head out – and don’t forget about the journeys you’ll make the morning after. “The consequences of drink driving can be devastating and we will be particularly vigilant during the festive period to discourage anyone thinking about drinking and driving, so the best advice if you are planning to drink this Christmas is don’t risk it, don’t drink and drive.”

Notes to editors

Facts

  • In 2014, 240 people in Great Britain were killed in crashes where at least one driver was over the drink-drive limit, largely unchanged since 2011;
  • Fatalities involving at least one driver over the alcohol limit accounted for 13% of road deaths in 2014;
  • Serious injuries where at least one driver was over the limit dropped by 3% cent between 2013 and 2014, the third consecutive annual decrease;
  • 70% of drink-drive fatalities in 2014 were men, showing a worrying trend developing;
  • A quarter of all drink-drive deaths in 2014 resulted from crashes where the driver over the limit was 25-39;[1]
  • Between 2010 and 2013 for every four deaths in collisions involving a drink-drive offence, one more death happened in a collision at a lower blood alcohol level;
  • It is estimated that lowering the drink-drive limit in 2010 could have saved 25 lives and prevented 95 serious injuries between 2010 and 2013.[2]

Drink driving is still one of the biggest killers on our roads. In 2014, it is estimated that 13% of all road deaths in Great Britain resulted from crashes where the at least one driver was over the alcohol limit [3]. A further estimated 25 road deaths per year are caused by drivers who are under the drink-drive limit, but who have significant amounts of alcohol in their blood [4].

The number of deaths involving a driver under the influence of alcohol was 240 in 2014. That figure has been consistently been reported since 2010 and this trend looks set to continue if the provisional estimate for the 2015 figures proves to be accurate (200-290 killed).[5]

These deaths, and the many more serious injuries, can be stopped if all drivers pledge to not drink any alcohol – not a drop – before driving. They can also be stopped by improving government policies. Evidence from around the world shows that taking steps such as lowering drink drive limits and stepping up police enforcement checks are highly effective in cutting drink-drive casualties.

Westminster rejected recommendations for a lower limit in the North Report into drink and drug driving and Transport Select Committee inquiry into the issue. We now have the highest drink drive limit in Europe, alongside Malta.

This month, the transport secretary, Chris Grayling caused outrage among campaigners and road safety groups when he said he would not consider lowering the drink-drive limit: “we ought not to penalise drivers for having one glass of wine”, he told the Daily Mail.

Latest Brake and Direct Line survey http://www.brake.org.uk/media-centre/1664-brake-survey-indicates-a-growing-public-demand-for-the-government-to-reduce-the-drink-drive-limit 

Read more at www.brake.org.uk/facts.

Advice

Brake calls on drivers to never drive after drinking any amount of alcohol – not a drop – and appeals to everyone to look out for friends and family by speaking out against drink driving.

There are plenty of alternatives to driving if you want to have a drink. Plan ahead for how you will get home by walking (if there's a safe route), taking public transport or booking a taxi. If you need to drive then decide on a designated driver who doesn't drink any alcohol at all, and make sure they stick to this.

Driving after drinking alcohol significantly increases your risk of crashing, potentially killing or injuring yourself, you passengers or someone else. Even if you feel sober after one drink, your reaction times will have slowed and your crash risk increased.

Don't drink if you are driving early the next morning. There's no way of knowing exactly how long it takes to sober up completely after drinking, but it's longer than many people think. As a rough guide you should allow one hour to absorb alcohol, plus at least one hour for each unit consumed – but it could take longer, so you should always leave extra time to be safe. If you have to drive the next morning, limit yourself to no more than one or two drinks. If you have a lot to drink, you may be impaired for all of the following day.

Brake is calling on members of the public to play their part in making roads safer by signing Brake’s Pledge at www.brake.org.uk/pledge, to make a personal commitment to use roads safely and sustainably, and help reduce the lives lost needlessly on our roads.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995. It works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook or Brake Blog

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

[1] DfT,Reported road casualties in Great Britain: Estimates for accidents involving illegal alcohol levels: 2014 (final) and 2015 (provisional), 2016

[2] Prof. R. Allsop, Saving lives by lowering the drink-drive limit, 2015

[3] DfT,Reported road casualties in Great Britain: Estimates for accidents involving illegal alcohol levels: 2014 (final) and 2015 (provisional), 2016

[4] Prof. R. Allsop, Saving lives by lowering the drink-drive limit, 2015

[5] DfT, Reported road casualties in Great Britain: Estimates for accidents involving illegal alcohol levels: 2014 (final) and 2015 (provisional), 2016

 

Travelling by bike and public transport

cycle4life_3Longer journeys can feel more convenient by car as it’s ‘door to door’. But have you considered using public transport and taking your bike with you for the bits of the journey at either end? This especially makes sense when commuting from one town to another, travelling to cities where parking can be a problem, or to rural areas where local bus services may be infrequent, or when visiting friends or going on holiday. Remember to consider the safety of what you are planning above all else. Make sure you are certain you have a safe route at either end.

Useful links:
Advice on travelling with your bike on public transport in the UK and abroad from the CTC.
Use a route planner listed on this page of Cycle4Life to plan your route.
Visit the campaigning page of Cycle4Life if you need to campaign for more safe routes for cyclists in your community.


<< Cycling to main facilities

<< Back to every day cycling

<< Cycle4life home page