Articles Tagged ‘resource - Brake the road safety charity’

An introduction to teaching road safety

Engaged in the right way, children and young people can really enjoy studying and campaigning for road safety because it is an issue they can understand and that affects them. And teaching road safety is a great way for you to reach goals for citizenship, health and safety and across the curriculum. This page provides an introduction to teaching road safety effectively and why it is such an important topic to teach.

Sensitivity issues
Before teaching road safety, check whether any children have been bereaved by, or hurt in, or witnessed a serious a road crash, and be sensitive to their needs. Talk to them and their carers about whether they wish to be excluded from classroom lessons that discuss death or injury. Brake has developed resources for children bereaved by road crashes and their carers. Call our help line 0845 603 8570 to obtain these resources.

Why road safety is an important teaching topic
Every death of a child is devastating for a nursery, school or college. You can play a vital role in protecting children by incorporating road safety into lessons and engaging in activities to get life-saving messages across to pupils, parents and throughout the local community. You also have a responsibility to ensure high standards of road safety when on trips away from your school on foot or by vehicle. You are also at the heart of a community and therefore well placed to work with local government to implement necessary road safety engineering improvements, such as crossings or lower speed limits, on local roads.

Road safety also falls within curriculum requirements. It appears in different parts of the curriculum in different parts of Britain. In England, for example, road safety education is part of the statory frameworks for PSHE and citizenship at key stages 1 and 2. It also can be linked to the wider curriculum, in subject areas such as geography, maths and science. For more on prioritising road safety to meet curriculum requirements, see the Department of Transport's guidance on delivering road safety education in your early years setting or school.

When explaining to colleagues why you want to focus on road safety, you might want to mention these 7 important points:

  1. For every child killed, about ten more are seriously injured, causing brain injuries, paralysis and limb loss. These are horrendous, life-changing injuries for a child. Every community is affected by road death and injury at some stage.
  2. Many of these deaths and injuries will not hit the headlines, and only be reported in local press, so the problem is bigger than you may imagine; death on the road is the biggest killer of older children and young people in the UK.
  3. The UK has one of the worst child road death rates in Europe.
  4. It is particularly important to focus on road safety if you have busy fast roads in your community, or if you are based in an area with deprived families. Deprived children are much more likely to die on roads than more well-off children who have large gardens and cars.
  5. Poor road safety engineering (high speed limits, lack of cycle paths, lack of crossings) is one of the biggest causes of poor child health, because children and their parents choose, due to the danger, not to walk or cycle, and take the car instead.
  6. Boys are much more likely to die or be hurt than girls. They are more inclined to take risks on foot, bicycles, and when a novice driver.
  7. The older children get, the more at risk they become, as they gain independence. So road safety is not just a topic for young children.

Classroom teaching is more effective if combined with practical experiences and campaigning
Effective road safety learning involves three components: classroom teaching, roadside experiences and training and then, best of all, getting the children working within your community to campaign for road safety.

Effective road safety teaching needs to:

  • Build on existing knowledge, not preach
  • Require children to think for themselves
  • Be discussive and creative and related to real life

Children need to be taught their road safety ABC:

A is for awareness (traffic is dangerous and hurts people)
B is for behaviour (rules you must follow to stay safer)
C is for choice and community campaigning (how to make the safest choices and to help others make these choices too)

Under 8’s can be taught A and B from the age of two upwards. They can be taught rules and encouraged to follow them through practical training. However, under 8’s should never use roads without an adult, and adults should follow the Green Cross Code at all times when on foot with their children. Adults should, at all times, hold children’s hands or use reins with younger children because under 8’s:
-have difficulty judging speed and distance;
-are easily distracted and act on impulse;
-have difficulty understanding danger and death and are oriented around play;
-are small (so can’t see hazards) and are still developing eyesight and hearing;
-should never be allowed to walk near roads on their own for these reasons and more. -are carefree, not careless!

Over 8’s will have more ability to understand C, and make their own choices based on different options and assessment of risk. However, they need to have A and B re-emphasised to them because over 8’s:
-may walk on their own but make mistakes that can cost their lives because of lack of experience;
-are vulnerable to peer pressure from other children to make risky choices, such as running across a road.

The following sections list teaching topics within the road safety ABC.

A is for awareness: Traffic is dangerous and hurts people
You can teach, with increasing frankness as children get older, that:

  • Traffic hurts thousands of people every year.
  • People hurt by traffic are often killed and seriously injured. Injuries include paralysis and losing limbs. (Note: many children may think minor injuries such as breaking an arm are OK, or even fun, because it draws attention to them.)
  • Some people do dangerous things when walking or cycling, such as texting on their mobile while crossing a road. These people are more likely to be killed or hurt.
  • Some drivers break laws, which increases the chance of you being killed or hurt - for example, speeding, or driving when drunk. We have laws such as speed limits to stop people being killed or hurt in crashes, but some drivers break laws.

B is for behaviour: Rules you can follow to stay safe
Children need to be taught the language of road safety before they can understand the rules! For example, names of vehicles, names of street furniture such as pavements and kerbs, and an understanding of fast, slow, looking, listening and crossing. A well-educated reception age child should already have a grasp of fundamental road safety rules thanks to their parents. However, others may not have benefited from this care. Therefore, you will have to begin by checking that all children understand the following:

  • Pavements are for people; roads are for traffic.
  • Never go out near roads without a grown up. Hold their hand and don’t let go.
  • Stop at once if you are told. Never try to cross a road until you are told.
  • Never run or play near roads - play in a park or garden.
  • You can help grown ups look and listen for traffic.
  • Lollipop people, pelican crossings and zebra crossings help people cross the road. When a red man appears, it means you must stop.
  • You can wear bright clothes to be seen by traffic.
  • In a car, never undo your belt and don’t play with door handles or try to get out.

By the age of 5, children are ready to learn, in addition to the above:

  • The Crossing Code (find a safe place to cross, stop, look, listen, cross with care)
  • The safest places to cross: underpasses; footbridges; where there is a lollipop person; pelican and puffin crossings; zebra crossings.
  • In a car, only get out on the pavement side.
  • In a bus or coach or minibus, wear your seat belt if one is fitted. When getting off, never cross the road in front or behind the bus. Wait until it has pulled away so you can see in all directions.

By the age of 9 and upwads, depending on development, children are ready to explore:

  • Bereavement issues and the social and economic impacts of road crashes.
  • The responsibilities of drivers.
  • The dangers of giving in to peer pressure to take risks.

Read more about teaching older pupils further down.

C is for choice: How to make the safest choices and help others stay safe too
Under-8’s are ill-equipped to make their own choices. However, it is important that older children recognise their ability to make safe choices, recognise pressures they may come under to make dangerous choices and learn how to resist those pressures, and how to speak up for the safety of others too. Younger children can also be encouraged to think about choices, as long as they are not encouraged to make those choices on their own. All children can be encouraged to speak out against dangerous behaviour, such as children pushing each other into the road, or running across roads without looking, or drivers driving too fast, or people not doing up their seatbelts.

Teaching road safety to children and young people aged 11-20

Pupils aged 11-20 may initially think that road safety is for ‘babies’ and ‘boring’, but most young people have a lot to say about road safety and won’t find it boring as long as it’s taught well! In fact, effective road safety teaching with these age ranges enables you to explore challenging and worth-while areas, including:

  • Death and bereavement
  • Life-changing injuries (paralysis and brain injury) and how this affects people and their families
  • Taking responsibility for others in the context of good citizenship - particularly if we are driving
  • Our addiction to cars and how they affect communities
  • The battle of the sexes - differences in risk-taking behaviour among males and females
  • Alcohol and drugs - the rise in binge-driving and drug use among young people, linked with the issue of drink-driving
  • The power of adrenalin and testosterone to negate concerns for personal safety

There are a number of reasons that pupils may not initially be receptive to road safety teaching because of poor attitudes. For example, they may:

  1. Think they ‘know it all’ and road safety is for ‘babies’;
  2. Already be taking extreme risks on roads (for example, mucking about on foot on busy roads, driving without a licence or taking illegal drugs and driving);
  3. Feel invincible - road crashes happen to someone else, not them. They think their youth and fast reaction times will keep them out of trouble;
  4. Have a misunderstanding of the true extent of deaths and injuries on roads and just how at risk they are, particularly as young people.

On the positive side, young people are likely to:

  • Have witnessed risky behaviour on roads and grasp road safety issues easily as they deal with roads every day;
  • Have experienced, or heard of, someone in their community being hurt or killed in a road crash, and therefore understand that death and serious injury is a reality on roads.

Effective road safety teaching for this age range should:

  • Build on pupils’ existing knowledge, not preach;
  • Require pupils to think for themselves and conduct original research;
  • Be discussive and creative, and related to pupils’ real lives;
  • Involve real-life projects (such as devising and running a campaign to get parents and pupils to ‘belt up’) not just class-room learning;
  • Explore the dangers of risk-taking;
  • Explain clearly that road safety is about stopping deaths and life-long serious injuries and therefore it is crucial to take it seriously - particularly as these pupils are in the highest risk group for dying on roads.

Now plan your lessons!
Go back to Teaching resources for lesson ideas, downloads, web links and more advice.

Beep Beep! Day Resources

If you register to run a Beep Beep! Day we will send you some great resources such as posters, stickers and certificates for the kids, a giant poster for kids to put paint hand prints on, and sponsorship envelopes.

Beep resources group shot 2014 small

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to register now for Road Safety Week – and get free resources

28 March 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are being urged to get involved in Road Safety Week 2014 (17-23 November), the UK's biggest road safety event, to help make streets and communities safer. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging educators, professionals and community leaders to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to get ideas on promoting safer road use and campaigning for safer roads in the Week, and register online for a free e-action pack.

Road Safety Week, now in its 18th year and supported by headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers, is a great opportunity for groups and individuals to team up and take action on road safety, and run activities to raise awareness and prevent needless casualties.

Everyone can access ideas plus free electronic resources and guidance to help them get involved at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk. Anyone who registers to be part of the Week is emailed a free e-action pack with downloadable posters and advice and case studies of what others have done in previous years.

The Road Safety Week 2014 theme is 'look out for each other': raising awareness of the ways everyone can help protect one another on roads, especially the most vulnerable. Brake will particularly call on drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike by slowing down to 20 in communities and looking twice and taking it slow at junctions and bends. Read more. Participants in the Week can run an initiative on this theme or any other road safety topic.

Last year 7,795 community groups, schools and organisations registered to take part, running activities ranging from fundraisers, road safety workshops, to protests against fast traffic, to community speed checks, to poster design competitions, many in partnership with local authorities, emergency services, or other agencies.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, says: "Road safety is a critical issue for communities everywhere, so we're calling on schools, groups and organisations around the country to play their part in making streets safer. Road Safety Week is a perfect opportunity to take action on local road safety issues, by campaigning, raising awareness and making a difference – especially in relation to protecting the most vulnerable road users, like children. Our theme this year is 'look out for each other', calling on everyone to be considerate on roads, but especially calling on drivers to slow down and take care to protect people on foot and bike. Everyone can help get this vital message out, and make a big difference to their local community. Log on to the Road Safety Week website for ideas and inspiration, and to register for a free e-action pack to help you take part."

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities
Runners and cyclists

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week
Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charity Brake, and now in its 18th year. In 2014 it will take place 17-23 November, with headline sponsorship from RSA and Specsavers. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraging grassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities. www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

About Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion

As a leading car insurer we have a natural interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK we have been a partner of Brake since 2011 and we also undertake road safety campaigns in many of our businesses across the world.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to register now for Road Safety Week – and get free resources

10 April 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are being urged to get involved in Road Safety Week 2015 (23-29 November), the UKs biggest road safety event, which involves thousands of schools each year. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging educators, professionals and community leaders to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to get ideas on teaching and promoting road safety during the Week, andregister for a free e-action pack.

Road Safety Week is now in its 19th year and coordinated with the support of headline sponsor Specsavers and the Department for Transport. Itsa great opportunity for groups and individuals to team up and take action on road safety, and run activities to raise awareness and prevent needless casualties.

Everyone can access free electronic resources and guidance to help them get involved.Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk for ideas and to register to get a free e-action pack (emailed out from September). This includes downloadable posters to display during the Week and advice and case studies of what other schools have done in previous years.

Announced this week, the Road Safety Week 2015 theme isdrive less, live more.Educators can link activities to this theme or any road safety topic.Brake will be encouraging families to consider how they use roads, and if they can ditch some vehicle mileage, and instead walk, cycle or use public transport as much as possible. Educators can engage pupils in exploring the benefits of sustainable and active travel and opportunities for their family to get around this way.They can: run a travel survey; map safe active travel routes in the area, promote active travel to students and parents through a display or web page; run lessons and assemblies that explore sustainable and active travel benefits.Read more.

Road crashes are the biggest cause of death among young people [1], and there is increasing acknowledgement of the threat traffic pollution and sedentary lifestyles pose to children and families. So raising awareness of road safety and creating safe spaces for sustainable and active travel is vital. Its an engaging topic, with plenty of scope for creative and interactive learning, while also meeting curriculum goals. Road Safety Week is also an opportunity for schools to promote wider action in the community to protect local children and families.Read more examples of how educators got involved in 2014.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, says:Road safety isn’t just about safe driving and using the green cross code. It’s about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing what we can to protect ourselves, people around us and the environment. A big part of that is driving less if we can, and this can make a huge difference to families’ health and wellbeing, communities and the planet. That’s why this Road Safety Week, we’re encouraging everyone to consider how they use roads, and if possible ditch some vehicle mileage, and walk, cycle or use public transport instead.

Everyone can help to get this vital message out. Thousands get involved in Road Safety Week every year - see www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk for ideas, and to register for a free action pack to help you take part.

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week
Road Safety Week is the UKs flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charityBrake, and now in its 19th year. In 2015 it will take place 23-29 November, with headline sponsorship from Specsavers and with support from the Department for Transport. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraginggrassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities.www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was£
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britains most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Readers Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high streetprovider of adult audiologyservices to the NHS
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country

End notes

[1] Death registrations in England and Wales: Table 2 Deaths by age, sex and underlying cause, 2012 registrations, Office National Statistics, 2013

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to run great events as part of Brake's Road Safety Week

25 July 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are urged to take part in Road Safety Week 2014 (17-23 November), the UK's biggest road safety event, which involves thousands of individuals and organisations each year. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging people to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to register for a free e-action pack, and to start planning great events and promote road safety during the Week.

Road Safety Week, supported by headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers, is a great opportunity for everyone to engage pupils, employees or their community in life-saving lessons. The theme of Road Safety Week 2014 is 'look out for each other': raising awareness of the ways everyone can help protect one another on roads, especially the most vulnerable. Brake will particularly call on drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike by slowing down to 20 in communities and looking twice and taking it slow at junctions and bends. We'll also call on everyone to be considerate to one another on roads. Read more. People can run their initiative on this theme or any other road safety topic.

REGISTER NOW! Register at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk  to get a free e-action pack. Plus, stay in touch by following @BrakeCharity and tweet about the Week using #roadsafetyweek

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chiefexecutive, says: "Road safety is a critical issue for schools, and educators can be pivotal in helping reduce the risks children and young people face – by teaching road safety, raising awareness locally and campaigning for safer streets. Our 2014 theme is 'look out for each other', so educators can join our calls for everyone to be considerate on roads, and help get the message to drivers about protecting kids on foot and bike.

"There are endless options for getting involved, whether it's teaching children about being bright and seen, educating teenagers about not taking risks as passengers, encouraging families to walk not drive, or campaigning for drivers to slow down. Log onto the Road Safety Week website for ideas and examples, and to register for a free e-action pack to help you take part."

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities
Runners and cyclists

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charity Brake, and now in its 18th year. In 2014 it will take place 17-23 November, with headline sponsorship from RSA and Specsavers. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraging grassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities. www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group

With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion. As a leading car insurer we have a natural interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK we have been a partner of Brake since 2011 and we also undertake road safety campaigns in many of our businesses across the world.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director.
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand.
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012.
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland.
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff.
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012.
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011.
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK.
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street.
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS.
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brake launches website to support life-saving Road Safety Weeks around the world

Tuesday 29 July

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has today launched a Road Safety Week global hub - www.roadsafetyweek.org - to give easy access to road safety guidance, tools, resources and case studies for organisations around the world. Sponsored by RSA Insurance Group, it aims to help NGOs, government agencies, companies, schools, communities and local agencies organise successful awareness-raising road safety events and campaigns at national and grassroots level.

The charity hopes the site will help to increase the number and impact of regular Road Safety Weeks around the world - the value of which has been recognised in the UN's action plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety. The site shares Brake's experience as long-running organisers of national Road Safety Weeks in the UK and New Zealand, and showcases good practice case studies of other awareness-raising road safety events from around the world.

Resources that can be accessed through www.roadsafetyweek.org include:

Visit www.roadsafetyweek.org to see the full site, which will continue to be added to and expanded.

Brake is also running a series of free webinars alongside launching this site on coordinating Road Safety Week events, where attendees can hear from experienced organisers and get ideas and support:

  • 17 Sept 2pm BST (GMT + 1:00): webinar for NGOs, government agencies, communities and educators - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage communities on road safety;
  • 17 Sept 3pm NZST (GMT + 12:00): webinar for companies - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage employees and communities on road safety;
  • 18 Sept 2pm BST (GMT + 1:00): webinar for companies - Running a Road safety Week: an annual event to engage employees and communities on road safety; and
  • 18 Sept 3pm NZST (GMT + 12:00): webinar for NGOs, government agencies, communities and educators - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage communities on road safety.

For more information go to www.roadsafetyweek.org/webinars, and register online using our booking form.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive at Brake, said: "With more than 1.2 million people killed globally in road crashes each year, and tens of millions injured, it is vital that governments, NGOs, employers, community leaders and road safety practitioners work together to end this devastating epidemic. Organising a Road Safety Week at national, local or organisational level can be an effective way to get crucial road safety messages out widely to the public and help save lives. As long-running organisers of national Road Safety Weeks in the UK and New Zealand, we are keen to share our experience with others globally, promote good practice in road safety awareness-raising, and pool tools and resources. Our roadsafetyweek.org site provides potential Road Safety Week organisers with the information and resources they need to persuade people of the vital importance of using roads safely to protect yourself and others."

Peter Collins, head of corporate responsibility for RSA, said: "We share Brake's ambition to raise road safety awareness, promote safe sustainable road use and prevent devastating casualties. This new online hub is full of practical advice, tools and case studies and we're encouraging anyone looking to organise a road safety event to take advantage of its resources."

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

As a leading car insurer they have an interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK, they have been a partner of Brake since 2011. They undertake road safety campaigns in many of their businesses across the world.

Brake's Kids Walk - Thank you for registering!

Kids walk logo 

Thank you for registering for Brake's Kids Walk 2018.

 

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:your online action pack full of free resources are now available to download here.

Your printed action pack will be sent in the post shortly, and a member of the Kids Walk team will be in touch to make sure we have all the correct details.

If you have any queries please contact the team on 01484 550061 or email kidswalk@brake.org.uk.

Don't forget to share your photos and videos with us, Tweet @brakecharity, use the hashtag#BrakesKidsWalk and find uson Facebook.

A variety of additional resources to help with your event can be found on Brake's shop and check out THINK!'s brand new resources on their website.

WYSD

 

Brake's Kids Walk also provides a fantastic opportunity to raise valuable funds for Brake. You can either run the event as a sponsored walk or get your little ones to dress in their stripiest clothes, like our mascot Zak the Zebra, and hold Wear Your Stripes Day. More information about both options are in your action packs. As a charity we rely heavily on donations to aid our work in supporting road crash victims and campaigning for safer roads, so even a small donation makes a big difference!


This project is kindly sponsored by:Co op

Kids walk foot border long

Brake's Kids Walk - Welsh e-resources

Kids walk logo

To help schools in Wales engage their children, we have created additional resources in the Welsh language. These can be displayed alongside resources in English to help children understand these important words in both languages.

Mae Brake's Kids Walk yn ffordd gwych o alluogi plant i roi eu traed un o flaen y llall er mwyn codi ymwybyddiaeth o ddiogelwch y ffordd yn y gymuned, drwy alw am lwybrau cerdded, llwybrau seiclo, mannau diogel i groesi, traffig araf a thraffig glân.

Click on the icons to download and print out the relevant materials to help you run activities or fundraise.

Don't forget to share any pictures with us on Facebook or Twitter and use #brakeskidswalk. Good luck!

Promote your walk

Promote_1
Promote_2
Promote_3

Colouring sheets

Colour_1
Colour_2
Colour_3
Colour_4
Colour_5
 

Posters

Poster_1
Poster_2
Poster_3
Poster_4
Poster_5
 

Certificate

Certificate
 
 

 

Take me back to Kids Walk English resources.

Brake's Kids Walk e-resource pack

Kids walk logoThank you for registering to take part in Brake's Kids Walk, sponsored by Co-op Insurance, on or near Wednesday 13 June 2018.

Below is your free e-resource pack to help you run your walk and inspire children, aged 4-11, to get involved. These resources are to complement the hard copy ones that have been posted out to you. 

Simply click on the icons to download and print out the relevant materials to help you run activities or fundraise.

Don't forget to share any pictures with us on Facebook or Twitter and use #brakeskidswalk and good luck!

To view these resources in Welsh click here.

Getting started 

KW Sharing pic 
Sharing image for newsletters and email signatures.

Kids walk Guidance FINAL psKids walk risk assessment 2

 KW spon form 2018 ps

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


Posters for display

KW taking part E ps KW WYSD poster E ps KW sponsored Walk ps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Assembly

Kids walk assemblies plan FINAL psKids Walk assembly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Activity sheet and answer sheet

  Kids walk Quiz sheet 2018 V2 ps Kids walk Quiz sheet 2018 answers ps

 

 

 


Colouring sheets

KW colouring sheets E Footpaths ps KW colouring sheets E Cycle Paths ps KW colouring sheets E Safe Places to Cross ps KW colouring sheets E Slow Traffic ps KW colouring sheets E Clean Air ps KW WYSD colour in sheet ps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posters

KW poster E ps Footpaths KW poster E ps Cycle Paths KW poster E ps Safe places to cross KW poster E ps Slow Traffic KW poster E ps Clean Traffic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificate

A5 Kids Walk cert E ps

Brake's Kids Walk e-resource pack

Kids walk logoThank you for registering to take part in Brake's Kids Walk, sponsored by Co-op Insurance, on or near Wednesday 13 June 2018.

Below is your free e-resource pack to help you run your walk and inspire children, aged 4-11, to get involved. These resources are to complement the hard copy ones that have been posted out to you. 

Simply click on the icons to download and print out the relevant materials to help you run activities or fundraise.

Don't forget to share any pictures with us on Facebook or Twitter and use #brakeskidswalk. Good luck!

To view these resources in Welsh click here.

Getting started 

KW Sharing pic 
Sharing image for newsletters and email signatures.

Guidance
Risk_assessment
Sponsor_form

Promote your walk

Poster_display_1
Poster_display_2
Poster_display_3

Assembly and lesson plans

Assembly_1
Assembly_ppt
KW lesson plans

Activity sheet and answer sheet

Activity_sheet
Answer_sheet

Colouring sheets

Colour_1
Colour_2
Colour_3
KW colouring sheets E Slow Traffic ps
Colour_5
Colour_6

Posters

Poster_1
Poster_2
Poster_3
Poster_4
Poster_5
 

Certificate

Certificate
 
 

Devising road safety lessons and activities for pupils with SEN

Consider pupils abilities to understand risk

On the other teaching resources pages, you'll find information on the general abilities of children of different ages to perceive and understand risk and make safe choices. Advice on these pages is based on 'normal' development of these abilities. Therefore it's essential to consider SEN pupils' abilities to perceive and understand risks and make safe choices, in order to decide which safety messages to teach.

Consider risks faced by pupils now, and risks they may face in the future
It's important, as when delivering road safety education to any children, to consider the actual risks they face in their everyday lives, and how pupils' learning difficulties and disabilities may heighten those risks. For example, you may have a large number of pupils, including some with ADHD who are impulsive and easily distracted, who walk to school, and have to negotiate fast, busy roads on the way. In this case, providing effective teaching about the risks posed by fast traffic and the importance of walking safely in a way that is accessible and relevant for pupils with ADHD (as well as working with your local authority to try to achieve safety measures on the roads) should be a priority.

You should also try to consider what risks pupils with SEN may face in the future. For example, pupils moving up to secondary school may start to walk and cycle independently more often and may encounter new pressures to act dangerously. Lessons should take this into account. Some pupils with SEN may have previously had limited opportunity for independent travel and exploration, but these opportunities may increase as they get older, so they still need to be equipped with an understanding of how to keep themselves safe. Effective road safety education may help a child with SEN gain independence and mobility.

Consider what teaching methods will be most effective
As when teaching any subject to pupils with SEN, it is important to have an understanding of what is meaningful for those pupils and therefore what teaching methods they are most likely to respond to. This is particularly important for children with severe learning difficulties.[1] Many children with SEN will respond to clear instructions, with defined goals or rewards, as long as these goals or rewards are based on what is relevant to them.[2] It?s also crucial to consider any limitations of pupils' communication skills, and ensure that teaching is accessible for all pupils involved, if appropriate by using alternative teaching methods such as role-play and visuals.

Plan classroom and practical education
When educating any child on walking and cycling safely, the most effective teaching combines both classroom-based learning and practical roadside training. Practical training has been shown to be particularly effective for many children with learning difficulties, helping them to relate road safety rules and skills to a real-life context, and encouraging them to take responsibility for their own safety. [3] However, it is crucial to consult with your local council's road safety officer on the needs of your pupils and ensure that training can be run safely. To find details of your local road safety officer click here. You should also consult with parents, carers (as below) and your local authority's SEN specialist. Training for any pupils can be labour-intensive, but may be even more so for pupils with SEN who may require individual supervision and teaching, depending on the nature of their learning difficulty or disability. For this reason it requires thorough planning.

Involve parents and carers' and get them to teach road safety too
It's important to involve parents and carers in planning lessons and activities, particularly for children with severe learning difficulties and disabilities. You should consult them on: how their child uses roads; the main risks they perceive the child facing now and in the future; any problems or successes they have had in the past when teaching the child about road safety and other safety topics; and what teaching techniques they know to be most effective for their child. It may also be appropriate to directly involve parents or carers in any practical roadside training. Many parents will have already been teaching road safety to their children from an early age, so can offer valuable input on the abilities of their child and the most effective teaching methods.

Involving parents and carers has the additional benefit of reinforcing the importance of them teaching road safety to children outside school on an ongoing basis. Effective road safety teaching in schools should be constantly reinforced by all adults who use roads with the children.[4] It is particularly important with children with SEN to ensure that road safety messages taught inside and outside school are consistent, so it's crucial to establish and maintain effective communications with parents on what's being taught.

Adapt lesson ideas according to pupils' needs
Some advice on teaching road safety to children with different types of SEN is given below. You can use this advice to adapt lesson ideas and activities on this website for 5-8 year-olds, 8-11 year-olds, 11-15 year-olds and 15-18 year-olds. Depending on the needs and abilities of pupils, you may find you can adapt lesson ideas for the age group you are teaching, or from the age group below. You may find it useful to write a long-term plan, and targets, for teaching road safety into pupils? Individual Education Plans.

For children with severe, profound or multiple learning difficulties, you should consult and work with your local authority's special education needs advisor to develop appropriate lessons.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

  • Create, and teach the children to develop, personal routines, which are based on children's actual behaviour and which they can use in their everyday lives to keep them safe. For example, if they are driven to school, develop a routine they can use to: get into the car; do up their seatbelt; check siblings are belted up too; play a game or activity on the journey so they don't distract the driver (e.g. see how many red cars they can spot); get out of the car on the pavement side; and walk into school safely. If they regularly walk to a local park or friend's house, create a routine for that journey, including spotting and avoiding hazards and choosing safe places to cross on the way.
  • Use clear, reasonable and specific requests to teach safety rules.For example, ' You should always stop and look and listen for traffic before crossing any road. Only cross when you're sure there's nothing coming. If you step into the road without looking and listening, a car could hit you and hurt or even kill you. rather than It's important to always cross roads sensibly.
  • Set easily understood boundaries,to define what is and isn't appropriate behaviour in terms of putting yourself and others in danger. For example, ask the class to name things they've seen people doing on roads that are safe or dangerous, putting them into the two categories on the board. Then go through with the class the possible outcomes of each action to demonstrate why each is safe or dangerous. You could use slides from our downloadable powerpoint presentation (aimed at pupils of average development age 8-11, 11-15, 15-18) to help you do this.
  • Employ new, innovative teaching methods to create and maintain interest. It may be useful to use role play and visual tools such as models to illustrate the messages you are teaching. Some pupils with ADHD may respond better to visual or movement-based teaching, rather than verbal communication alone.
  • Use one-to-one communication, and remove disruptions or distractions * where possible.* It can be helpful sitting children with ADD or ADHD at the front of the class and engaging different pupils, including those with ADD or ADHD, individually in discussions about risk, taking care to relate it to their real lives. [5]

Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

  • Help children 'generalise' safety skills or rules, encouraging them to apply what they're taught to a range of situations when using roads. For example, teach that the Green Cross Code should be used when crossing any road, no matter what. Then talk through different scenarios and settings (using pictures or toy people and cars or stories) asking children what they should do in each case, to demonstrate the Code should be used in each. Some of the settings could include pressures on the children to act dangerously or disobey the Code, such as a friend calling to them from over the road, or being in a rush to get to school on time. It is also important to consider and highlight exceptions to rules, such as emergency service vehicles going through red lights.
  • Use practical training, which is easier to generalise than class-room teaching, as it is based in a context that is closer to real life. If possible, provide this training on the routes that pupils actually use.
  • Explain the importance of safety rules in literal terms, rather than by putting them into a social context of what's acceptable and what will be viewed favourably. For example, explain specifically that failing to follow safety rules can lead to death or serious injury, rather than talking about being 'good', 'sensible' or 'naughty'.
  • Make sure your instructions are clear and complete. For example, the following could be misunderstood if taken literally, as it may be by a pupil with ASD: You should always stop and look and listen for traffic before crossing any road. If you don't, a car could hit you and hurt or even kill you. This could be understood to mean that as long as you stop, look and listen, you'll be safe. It misses out the step of 'Only cross if there are no vehicles coming.'

Dyspraxia

  • Teach the dangers of taking chances - children with dyspraxia may have particular difficulty judging the distance between them and approaching traffic. However, it's important to teach all children that it's difficult for anyone (even adults) to judge the speed at which traffic is approaching. It's made even harder by many drivers breaking speed limits. Emphasise that children shouldn't cross unless they are certain the way is clear. Ideally, they should plan routes that make use of traffic-light controlled crossings or zebra crossings, although on the latter children should always wait until traffic has come to a complete stop. (If routes to your school don't have crossings, you can contact your local council to find out if they can be put in place.) To demonstrate the dangers of taking chances, and of crossing roads with fast traffic, you could measure out stopping distances of vehicles travelling at different speeds. You could also discuss dangerous things that some drivers do that mean they might not be able to spot a child in the road (e.g. speeding, talking on a mobile, driving while tired or drunk) and why the children think drivers take these risks.
  • Teach the dangers of staying well away from traffic, especially fast traffic.Children with dyspraxia may be at particular risk of stumbling into the road. This is particularly dangerous on faster roads, where drivers are less likely to be able to stop in time. It's important to teach all children the importance of using safe routes where they are available, particularly footpaths that are set away from traffic, and routes that make use of crossings and avoid fast roads. You could also work with the children to draw a big map of the area, plotting safe routes to and from the school and linking homes to local amenities.
  • Help children develop strategies for telling left from right ' many children may have difficulty telling left from right so it may be a useful exercise to get all pupils to come up with their own ideas for ways of remembering left from right, such as wearing different coloured gloves or shoelaces (red representing right), holding up their forefingers and thumbs at right-angles to see which hand spells 'L', or visualising which hands they hold their knife and fork in. Encourage pupils to stop and think about which is which before following an instruction, and to check with an adult or friend if they're not sure.
  • Communicate your teaching to specialists working with pupils children with dyspraxia may be seeing specialists to help develop certain skills, particularly the physical movements involved in daily tasks. If possible, get in touch with these specialists (via pupils' families) to tell them about the road safety lessons you're running, and to help them reinforce your teaching and incorporate road safety into their sessions. For example, specialists may be able to run exercises to help children carry out the physical actions needed to cross a road safely.

Dyslexia

  • Use practical training, role play, diagrams and other visual aidsto demonstrate how to make safe choice on roads, which dyslexic children are likely to find more memorable and easier to understand than written rules. For example, get children to act out different scenes involving them experiencing pressures to use act dangerously. They could act out two alternative endings for each scene  one where they act safely and one where they act dangerously. You could also use pictures and diagrams from Brake's powerpoint presentations (for 8-11s, 11-15s and 15-18s).
  • Help children develop strategies for telling left from right (as above, under dyspraxia).

Back to menu - Teaching road safety to children with SEN


 

 

[1] Phil Goss, Meaning-led learning for pupils with severe and profound and multiple learning difficulties (British Journal of Special Education, 2006)

[2] www.netdoctor.co.uk

[3] The Road Safety of Children and Adults with Disabilities (Transport Research Laboratory, 2002)

[4] The Road Safety of Children and Adults with Disabilities (Transport Research Laboratory, 2002)

[5] Advice on ?management techniques? for adults working with children with ADD/ADHD from www.netdoctor.co.uk and www.kidsource.com?

Disclaimer: Brake is not responsible for the content of external websites

Direct Line Group Lesson Plan

 

Props – Take a sturdy toy truck that rolls in a straight line, and a torch.  Today we’re going to talk about ROAD SAFETY.

I’m going to start by telling you something really sad. Every day seven children are very badly hurt by traffic on roads in this country while those children are walking or on bikes. We’ve all fallen down and hurt our knees haven’t we? Children who are hurt on our roads are much more badly hurt than that. Some are so badly hurt that they don’t get better.

I’m now going to tell you something really good. We can all learn really easy things to keep us safer near roads and we’re going to do this in this lesson, so we can STAY SAFE.

Can anyone tell me some kinds of traffic? (Car/ Bus / Truck / Fire engine / Motorbike etc.)

Can anyone do the NOISES that this traffic makes? (Children make traffic noises)

That’s one of the useful things about traffic. You can sometimes use your EARS to hear it coming.

Traffic isn’t just noisy, it’s also FAST. This means it comes quickly. Does anyone know why traffic can move so fast, faster than you on legs? (Wheels)

Let’s do an experiment, to see if wheels are faster than legs
(Child chosen to then walk sensibly across the hall holding hands with you, while a solid, toy truck (use a big one that goes in a straight line) is rolled across the hall at the same time – the truck will move much faster.)
 
Traffic is also HARD. Prod your tummy. Is it soft or hard? (Soft)
This is why traffic can hurt you. You are soft and traffic is hard.

We’ve found out that traffic is NOISY, FAST AND HARD AND CAN HURT US. So let’s all clap our hands for learning these important lessons.  (Children clap)

Hands are good for clapping. What else can we use hands for to keep us safe on roads?
(Holding hands)

What other bits of our body can we use to keep us safe on roads (pointing to eyes and ears)
(Eyes and ears)

That’s right, we have to look for traffic, and we have to listen for traffic. Sometimes we have to look very carefully and listen very carefully because traffic might be far away or round a corner, but we know it might get to us fast.

I know a rhyme that we can learn today. Are you ready? Listen carefully so you can copy me when I say it again.

I STOP before I cross the street,
I use my EYES and my EARS before my FEET.
(holding up hand to indicate ‘stop’ then pointing to eyes, ears and then feet)

(Repeat with the children.)

Now we’re going to play my thumbs up, thumbs down game. If you think that I am saying something sensible and safe, stick your thumb up. If you think I am saying something daft and dangerous, stick your thumb down.

•    My balloon has gone into the road and I am going to run after it
•    I want to cross the road and there is a green man showing.
•    I want to cross the road but there is a red man showing.
•    My best friend is further up the road but they haven’t seen me, so I want to run ahead of my mum to catch them up.
•    I’m going to play in the park away from roads
•    I’m in the car but I think we are going to be late for a party. I tell my dad to drive faster.

(Children stick thumbs up and down. Use as the basis of discussion. Why are these things safe or dangerous? What do the children think?)

I think we’ve all done very well there and thought very hard about how to stay safe. Let’s give ourselves another round of applause.
(clapping)

Logo-12-directlinegroup

EYP-files

To download offline versions, please right click the link below and click 'save link as'. This will then download a .swf shockwave flash file. If your preferences are not already set to automatically do this, you will need to select to open these files using any flash enabled browser such as Chrome or Internet Explorer. You will be able to open the file in a browser without access to an internet connection.

stopping distance calculator

morning after drink drive calculator

Families get involved!

FamilyMany families have concerns about road safety, from being able to walk and cycle safely in your community - and deciding whether to allow your child to walk or cycle alone - to concerns about teenagers being in danger as passengers or new drivers.

Parents can use our advice for parents to help keep the whole family safe. 

Kids can get road safety tips and access online games here.

Teens and young people can support our L for Later campaign and use our section on young people and road safety

There's also lots families can do to campaign for and champion road safety in your community, with Brake's help:

- Get local nurseries involved by encouraging them to run a road safety Beep Beep! Day, using a free resource pack from Brake

- Encourage primary schools to take part in Brake's Kids Walk

- Work with your local club, group or employer to run awareness-raising activities in Road Safety Week

- Start or join a local campaign, calling for lower speed limits, better enforcement, or pavements, paths and crossings. Use our campaigning advice to make things happen!

- Fundraisefor Brake to support our life-saving work, have fun and help raise awareness too. Get ideas.

Want to do more to support road safety? Why not become a much-valued Friend of Brake, back our national campaigns, and sign up to our monthly bulletin to stay up-to-date with our work. 

 

 

Finding appropriate legal support and advice

This webpage is sponsored by: 

DigbyBrownlogo rgb large Irwin Mitchell logo full colour Lyons Davidson SlaterGordon CHARCOAL BLUE

Expert legal advice and support can be helpful to people affected by road death and injury. There may be a number of legal matters that you need assistance with, from wills and probate issues to making a claim for damages. Solicitors specialising in civil law can help you with these issues.

This page focuses on finding specialist solicitors who can help you to claim damages following a road crash. Additional information about making a financial claim following road death or injury is available via Brake’s support literature webpages and should be read in conjunction with this page:

  • For people affected by road death, see our guides on “Information and advice for bereaved families and friends following a death on the road” (available on our support literature webpages or in hard-copy by calling the Brake helpline on 0808 8000 401).
  • For people affected by serious injury, see our online guide on serious injury following a road crash

Why is it important to choose a solicitor firm who specialises in personal injury law?

Like medicine, law is a very complex area and the people who get the best outcomes for their clients in particular areas of law are those who have specialist training and experience. Just as your GP doesn’t attempt to treat conditions that require the help of a consultant, a generalist solicitor firm cannot provide the level of expertise required to get you the best possible outcome from a civil claim.

How to choose the most suitable solicitor or legal firm to pursue a civil claim:

There are two organisations which represent specialist personal injury solicitors and they provide lists of their members on their websites. They are the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL) and the Motor Accident Solicitors Society (MASS).  The European equivalent is the Pan European Organisation of Personal Injury Lawyers(PEOPIL).

Brake additionally receives funding (of £15,000 each) towards its road crash helpline from the four specialist solicitor firms listed below. These firms are all APIL and MASS members. In addition, these firms have agreed to our Solicitor Code of Conductfor supporting road crash victims. 

If you would like to seek advice from one of Brake’s legal commercial helpline sponsors their details are listed below (in alphabetical order). These firms operate independently of Brake and if you choose to instruct one of these firms they should always act in your best interests, and according to our Code of Conduct. Our relationship with them does not affect the advice they would give you, which should always be impartial and confidential. Nor does it affect the support provided by Brake’s helpline, whether or not you decide to instruct a firm that financially assists our charitable work supporting road crash victims. Information about your case would never be shared without your express permission. 

Digby Brown  

Main contact: Fraser Simpson
Telephone and email: 0141 566 9507 and fraser.simpson@digbybrown.co.uk
Website: www.digbybrown.co.uk
Information about Digby Brown:Digby Brown Solicitors are Scotland’s largest personal injury law practice. With seven offices nationwide in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Inverness, Aberdeen, Kirkcaldy and Ayr, we help thousands of people who have been involved in road traffic crashes every year. Digby Brown were named Law Firm of the Year at the 2016 Law Awards of Scotland. The firm were also named Corporate Social Responsibility Firm of the Year, the third successive year the firm has received a national award for its work with charities and organisations across Scotland, including supporting a number of road safety awareness campaigns and events.
Why Digby Brown supports Brake: Digby Brown see the devastating effects of road traffic crashes on individuals, families and communities at first-hand every day.   We know the reality that there is too much carnage on our roads.  We also know the invaluable difference that Brake make to those affected by road traffic crashes and are proud to support and  campaign alongside the charity to make our roads safer for everyone.

Irwin Mitchell

Main contact: Claire Newstead
Telephone and email: 0113 218 6460 and claire.newstead@irwinmitchell.com 
Website:http://www.irwinmitchell.com/our-people/claire-newstead
Information about Irwin Mitchell: Irwin Mitchell Solicitors are one of the UK’s most respected and successful law firms, with an independent recognised personal injury team. We help support our clients with their claims after a road traffic collision as well as their families to help them access the best possible medical care, rehabilitation and financial support reaching an outcome that can make a real difference to their lives. Each year our personal injury lawyers also help bereaved families, who rely on us to fight fearlessly to protect their best interests and to try and gain justice for them in the most difficult of situations.
Why Irwin Mitchell supports Brake: We are proud to have supported Brake for many years and regard them as the leading national charity in supporting road safety for all road users including pedestrians. Their commitment to making our roads a safer place and their independent campaigning direct to Government is outstanding and consistent.  Without Brake, our roads would certainly be much less safe today.

Lyons Davidson

Main contact: Rachel Green
Telephone and email: 0117 904 5729 and rgreen@lyonsdavidson.co.uk
Website:www.lyonsdavidson.co.uk
Information about Lyons Davidson: Lyons Davidson Ltd is an award winning national legal practice. We are mindful of the impact and effects of fatal and life-changing injury suffered on the UK’s roads. We have supported countless bereaved families and assisted in the rehabilitation and compensation of those who have suffered life changing injuries. Our holistic and proactive approach ensures we focus on immediate rehabilitative and financial needs - as well as making all appropriate provision and support for the longer term. We are committed to carrying out business in a socially responsible way.
Why Lyons Davidson supports Brake: Brake is the leading national charity in campaigning for safer roads, educating us all to behave more safely on the roads and providing invaluable help to those affected by road death and serious injury. We are therefore extremely proud to have supported Brake for many years and recognise the very real difference made by Brake, in all areas of the charity’s work, every day.

Slater and Gordon

Main contact: Martin James
Telephone and email: 0161 383 3851 and Martin.James@slatergordon.co.uk
Website: www.slatergordon.co.uk
Information about Slater and Gordon: Slater and Gordon is one of the UK’s largest law firms with offices across the country. Our mission is to provide people with easier access to world class legal services. We are one of the country’s leading firms in personal injury and offer and unmatched breadth and depth of legal services for victims of injury. We have experts in personal injury who are classed as leaders in their field by independent legal guides, and have specialist expertise in catastrophic injuries. Our reputation is built on the services offered by our highly experienced staff who specialise in all areas of law. 
Why Slater and Gordon supports Brake: Having worked with Brake since 2001, it is incredible to see how the charity has developed over the years and the ever-increasing levels of support and resources it offers to families and professionals alike, who often have nowhere else to turn. The assistance and guidance the Brake team can offer are second to none and can make a big difference to people following life-changing incidents

Next steps, and questions to ask your solicitor:

Once you've identified a couple of firms you are interested in approaching you should be able to request an initial conversation free of charge with no obligation for you to take the claim forward with that firm if you don’t want to.

Brake has worked with APIL and MASS and specialist personal injury solicitors to develop a list of questions that can help you to decide between firms. You can also find these questions in Brake’s bereavement literature. We recommend that you use this list of questions when talking to solicitors and deciding whether or not to instruct a particular solicitor or firm.

  • Are you a member of APIL and/or MASS?
  • Do you think I have a strong claim and are you willing to take on my case?
  • What experience do you have in handling similar cases? Can you give me examples and their outcomes?
  • How many similar cases have you handled in the past five years?
  • What expertise do you have relevant to my case?
  • What fees do you charge?
  • What arrangements can you put in place for payment of these fees so that compensation I receive is not unduly spent on legal fees, and so that I do not have to pay much, or any, legal costs if I lose?
  • Will you handle my case yourself entirely, or involve colleagues?
  • If you plan to involve colleagues, how much will they be involved, and if a lot, can I meet them now?
  • How will we communicate during the process? Will you be available to explain things to me and answer my questions regularly through meetings, emails or over the phone?

Still need help selecting a specialist solicitor?

If you need any further advice or information about seeking legal support please contact the Brake helpline, 0808 8000 401 (Mon-Fri, 10am-4pm) or email helpline@brake.org.uk.

Complaints, breaches and disclaimer

Although the legal firms listed above financially support the Brake helpline, there are other reputable and experienced personal injury solicitors and you are free to use any solicitor of your choice. We have been careful to ensure that Brake’s funding firms, which provide legal services, only include firms that have agreed to Brake’s Code of Conduct . However, this does not imply that Brake can offer guarantees in respect of the information and services that these firms may provide, and no liability will attach to Brake or any of its staff, as a result of any person using this list.

Complaints procedure and breaches of our Code of Conduct: If, at any stage, you are unhappy with the service you are getting from your solicitor, you can complain to the firm via its complaints policy, which should be clearly accessible on their website. Alternatively, you can ask to speak to the partner in the practice responsible for looking after clients; often called the complaints partner.

If you remain dissatisfied, it may be possible to change solicitor. The Brake helpline can provide advice and assistance on seeking a second opinion or assisting you with any complaint procedures you are following. Call us on 0808 8000 401 or email helpline@brake.org.uk.

You can also make a complaint about a personal injury solicitor by contacting the legal ombudsman. Call 0300 555 0333 or go to www.legalombudsman.org.uk. Please note that Brake cannot investigate complaints against a solicitor, although we can act as an advocate on your behalf if requested to do so.

Additionally, if you believe that one of the above Brake helpline sponsor firms has not complied with Brake’s Solicitor Code of Conductthen please inform Brake in writing, setting out details of the firm and solicitor/s involved, and the specific part of the Code you believe has been breached and why. Brake will investigate the alleged breach and communicate the outcome of our investigation to the affected client. If we assess that a sponsor solicitor firm has breached our Code of Conduct, where appropriate we will press for any remedial action that is possible on the client’s behalf.

Letters alerting Brake to a breach of our Code of Conduct should be sent to: Brake, FAO Victim Support Services Manager, PO Box 548, Huddersfield HD1 2XZ; or emailed to: helpline@brake.org.uk, stating ‘BREACH – Solicitor Code of Conduct’ in the subject header.

For any complaints about Brake services please read our complaint policy.

Fleet managers and employers

The Workplace Depot is pleased to support Brake. Visit our site >

One in four road casualties involves a vehicle driven for work. If your organisation employs people who drive (whether commercial vehicles, company cars, or employees' own vehicles), Brake can help you manage road risk, reduce costs, protect your reputation, and promote community road safety.

Brake’s division for professionals, Brake Professional, provides a range of low-cost services on key road risk management topics, ranging from driver impairment to telematics.

Events: Brake offers a full calendar of professional development conferences, seminars and webinars, master-classes and on-site driver training.  

Awards: Brake’s prestigious Fleet Safety Awards take place annually and award road risk management best practice.

Resources: Brake Professional provides in-depth road risk management guidance reports and case studies, an online road safety research library, driver awareness tools such as online activities and posters, and a fortnightly road safety e-news.

Community engagement: Take part in community road safety events organised by Brake such as Road Safety Week.

Working with Brake gives you the opportunity to network with hundreds of other reputable organisations committed to road safety, from global blue chips to local authorities and SMEs. So get involved today.

Go to our Brake Professional site now to find out about more. Our events and awards are open to members and non-members of Brake. Joining the charity gives you access to our valuable resources.

Want to do more to support and work with Brake? Show your commitment to road safety and help fund the charity by becoming one of our much-valued corporate partners.

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Get creative!

Children are creative! Read below some fabulous winning entries from primary children to inspire you to incorporate road safety into literacy and project work in the classroom.

Safe Crossing by Rebecca Holland, aged 9

Walking down the street,
Cars whizzing past
I need to cross now,
My heart is thumping
I stop, I look, I listen
The cars are still whizzing past
I feel scared, I feel scared, I feel scared,
I look again, I listen again
Whizz, whiz, whiz
Then I see it, further down the street
All black and white
It’s calling to me
Cross here, cross here
I walk towards the zebra crossing
Then I stop, I look, I listen
The whizzings have gone
The cars have stopped
My heart’s stopped thumping
It’s safe to cross.

My Wake Up Dream, by Katie Henden-Dennis, aged 9

One day Kate woke up late as she head been up all night texting her best friend, Brittany. She got her books and bag together as fast as she could and went out of the house to meet Brittany at the top of the street. As she got to the top of Leamore Lane, she could see Brittany waiting for her on the corner.

As they started to walking to school, Brittany put some music on her phone. She was also showing Katie some pictures on her phone, they had not realised that they had stepped of the path in between two parked cars into the middle of a busy road.

They heard a screeching sound before they knew what was happening, Brittany was flying through the air and Katie was lying face down in the road. They were both taken to hospital. A week later was Brittany’s funeral. She had died from her injuries. I had a broken arm, cuts and bruises. I couldn’t stop crying If only we were paying more attention to the road, and paid more attention to the lollipop man, Brittany would still be here with me.

I started to cry and then scream. All of a sudden I work up in a sweat. I was still in bed, it was all a dream. I told Brittany about my dream and we said we would always use the lollipop man and give the road our full attention. So be safe and always give the road your full attention. Look, think and look again.

Stop, Look Listen by Haajirah Bibi

On Monday, we run to school
To the spot the lollipop lady stands,
“Good morning to you!” she calls
And reminds us to hold hands!
“How are we today?” she asks,
As she lets us cross the road.
On Tuesday, we dash again “slow down!”
She reminds us of the green cross code.
On Wednesday she’s beat us once more,
“Stay close” she calls “don’t cross, wait for me!”
“Don’t run ahead, now wait” she shakes her head,
“Too far from me, oh-dearie-me!”
On Thursday she waves to children
Behind parked cars, as they hide,
“Hey children, come around here, she smiles,
“Can you see this special crossing made so wide?”
On Friday, “naughty, naughty, walk behind the bars!
Speedy drivers cannot see you from their cars!”
“Be safe” she smiles “rules are there for you to follow”
“Thank you” we say. “You’re welcome, see you again tomorrow!”

The Tragic Accident, by Megan Ward, aged 9

Two boys were walking home from school. One was Tim and one was called Joshua. Joshua was 10 years old. He loved football and always watched it on TV. Tim was completely different. He’s 10 years old, he liked reading Charles Dickens and silence was his best friend. It was weird that two best friends were completely the opposite.

While they were walking, Joshua was talking about free kicks in football, Tim was interested so he made up a story in his head. Accidently Joshua dropped his football in the road. He ran into the road to go and get it. “My ball! I have to go and get it quickly!” Joshua cried. “No Joshua, no!” Tim shouted, “it’s dangerous!”

Suddenly BANG! Joshua was lying on the floor, clutching a punctured ball. Tim ran to the nearest shop and called the ambulance. They were there, quick as a flash. They quickly took Joshua into hospital, luckily he was alright. Joshua now knows its is dangerous to go into a busy road.

My True Story, by Georgia Weaver

I was walking down the lane with my friend Emily, singing the school song and when we came to Tangrigde Gardens I ran over the road to my mum’s car. I realised I had forgotten to say something to Emily and rushed back. It was so important, I slipped over and hurt my leg and a car was coming. Luckily it stopped in time so no serious damage was done but I could have died when I was only 8. That why, wherever you are, be careful and look left and right when crossing roads!

Use the Lollipop Man by Eda Eren

If you wanna have a life
And you wanna stay alive
You gotta pay attention
You gotta be wise
Always look and listen
Always be alert
Don’t ever bend the rules
Or you’ll get hurt!
Use the lollipop man
To cross the road to school
Don’t ever run across
And don’t ever act the fool!
Wait on the pavement
Always stay calm
And the traffic will be stopped
By the lollipop man
Always walk across the road
Don’t ever run
When you’re in the playground
You can have some fun!

Rain and Shine, by Megan Herdman, aged 10

When it shines,
Or when it rains,
Don’t forget to look both ways,
Don’t ever run across a road,
Especially carrying a heavy load,
Don’t ever cross by two parked cars,
A safer crossing can’t be far,
Oh, and don’t forget,
Don’t ever cross by a turn,
Recite this poem and you will learn,
Stop, look, listen? LIVE!

Road Safety Poem, by Bethany Stephens, aged 8

Stop at the crossing and look both ways. Listen for traffic and make sure it’s safe.
Make sure there’s no sirens or cars going too fast
If there is, don’t cross just let them go past.
At night wear something bright, maybe orange or green.
Something florescent so you can be seen.
Cross with a lollipop lady if you can, and don’t forget to wait for the green man.

A Road Safety Poem, by Sara Tariq, aged 11

Dear Driver, this poem is for you
And if you want to be safe, this is what you have to do:
When you drive on the road
You have to open your eyes
And be careful and wise!
Don’t drink alcohol before you drive,
It isn’t good
Because it could be dangerous for you
And make you invincible and dizzy!
Don’t get mad
And pay attention,
Think before you take action!
And another thing,
You also have to put your seatbelt on,
Even when you’re alone.

Road Safety, by Aisha Zanini-Hughes aged 6
Road Safety, road safety.
When it’s green, you can go
When it’s red, NO! NO! NO!
Make sure you still look left and right,
When you cross at the traffic light.
No cheeky crosses please!

GO 20 toolkit

Allianz Insurance is proud to sponsor the GO 20 toolkit.

Local authorities, community campaigners, emergency services and schools can use the resources in this toolkit to promote the benefits of 20mph limits, and raise awareness about the importance of drivers slowing down to protect people on foot and bike in towns, cities and villages.

For guidance on campaigning locally for 20 limits and other road safety measures, see Brake’s community campaign guide. For information on Brake’s national GO 20 campaign see brake.org.uk/go20.

All resources are downloadable below, plus we have a limited supply of hard copies of the leaflet. To request hard copies, please call us on 01484 559909 or email admin@brake.org.uk.

GO20researchreportRead our major research report on the extent of 20mph limits in Great Britain and the barriers faced by local councils in implementing them.

Posters

You can download and print these posters to display in your area (such as on community noticeboards, in libraries and shops, with permission), at community meetings, or in your work place. Hard copies of the first two posters are available.

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GO 20 quiz

Test your knowledge about 20mph limits with our GO 20 quiz, or share it on social media. The resource also includes videos from Dave Britt, whose son Aaron was killed by a speeding driver; Rod King from 20's Plenty; and Sarah Sharp, who successfully campaigned for 20mph limits in Chichester.

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Adverts

Display these in local newspapers and magazines, on websites and social media, or on bus backs or bus stops if you have access to advertising space. If you require a higher resolution version of an advert please email admin@brake.org.uk.

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Banners

Add these web banners to your online communications including websites, social media and email bulletins.

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Leaflet, factsheet and infographic

Download and print the factsheet and infographic, or share electronically via email, social media, or a link on your website.

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Order your GO 20 resources

To order hard copy GO 20 resources, please call us on 01484 559909 or email admin@brake.org.uk. Please note, we can only deliver within the UK.

Sign up to hear from Brake

To receive the latest road safety news and details of Brake's events and activities, please sign up here.

The GO 20 toolkit has been developed thanks to funding from Allianz Insurance.

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Great ideas for your Beep Beep! Day

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It's really easy and fun to take part in Beep Beep! Day and help save little lives.

Read on for our eight steps to a great Beep Beep! Day to get important road safety messages across to ensure children and their families.

There are also lots of ways you can raise funds for Brake and support our work with bereaved families during your Beep Beep! Day so thank you in advance for helping the charity!

Even if you only do two or three of these ideas, you'll still have a great day. Read on and get planning!

BeB_step_1_1Colourful tots! Children are sponsored to wear something crazily colourful - hats, tops, or socks, or whatever they've got.

It makes a great picture for your noticeboard and newsletter and helps emphasise the importance of drivers watching out for kids by slowing down and taking special care around children's homes and your premises.

BB_step_2_1Hand print and paint for safety! Make a giant hand print poster for your foyer using kids' hands and poster paints to help parents and children understand the importance of holding hands. Write across the top: "Going home? Hold hands!" You could also make a giant poster of pavements, roads, parks and buildings while kids cut out pictures of people, kids, buggies, dogs and vehicles from old magazines. Then get kids to stick the pictures in the safest places; children on pavements and in parks, while vehicles go on roads. Or print off copies of our colour-in poster downloads in our teaching resource centre.

BB_step_3_1Sing, listen, learn!Sing a road safety song with actions using the words stop, go, pavement and hold hands. Invent new verses to Wheels on the bus, such as "The children and the grown ups all hold hands, all hold hands, all hold hands". Listen to road noises recorded in advance eg. an ambulance, car, pelican crossing. Can the children tell what they are? Talk to kids using key road safety words such as pavement, kerb, road, car, danger, traffic, stop, look, and listen. Play road safety games on the internet. Or use this leader-led lesson script to teach simple messages including 'wheels go faster than legs', 'traffic is hard and you are soft'. It includes a great rhyme about crossing roads safely (with your mum or dad).

BB_step_4_1Get wet for safety!Invite your local fire service to come in and help the children wash parents' cars in return for a Beep Beep! donation. Kids love getting wet and busy, and fire hoses are very exciting. It's also a great way to teach kids that cars feel hard and are big and kids are soft and small. You can also use it as an opportunity to get kids to hand out to parents campaign flyers they have made themselves, for example with pictures of people holding hands, or kids using child seats, and carrying messages on them that you write, such as Hold hands, Use child seats, Slow Down.

BB_step_5_1Ride on! Make chalked-on roads in your secure playground/garden or hall and cardboard traffic lights, pelican crossings and zebra crossings! Sometimes, your local authority road safety team can lend you pretend road equipment too. Kids 'drive' on any ride-on, scooter or bike, supervised by staff or practise crossing the pretend roads safely on foot. Staff shout out instructions, for example, red means stop, green means go! Safety first! Use as an opportunity to teach key language, such as pavements, traffic, stop, slow, hold hands, kerb, etc.

BB_step_6_1Celebrity visit! Why not ask your local crossing patrol person or police officer to come along and help on the day and explain why they wear a big yellow coat? Young children love someone in uniform and they are often happy to help! Make sure this professional understands the messages you want them to deliver. Pre-school children are too young to be taught how to cross roads unaccompanied. It is much more important and valuable to teach them key road safety language and to teach them to hold hands, stay still in their child seat, and to stay on pavements and away from dangerous traffic.  You could also invite along Brake's mascot Zak the Zebra! He is a busy zebra, so book early!

BB_step_7_1Bake for Brake at break time! Follow this yummy traffic-light biscuit recipe and then scoff them with the kids, saving some to flog to parents to raise more money for Brake! Or have traffic light fruit at break time to be super-healthy: strawberries, satsumas and kiwis do the trick! It's a great opportunity to teach kids that red means stop, and to teach them about street equipment such as traffic lights and safer places to cross such as traffic-light controlled crossings. Show them pictures of these things, or take them on a closely-supervised walk on a safe pavement to show them a traffic-light controlled crossing (one adult per two children so you have a hand for each child).

BB_step_8_1Raise wider awareness through local media! Beep Beep! Day is a great way to raise awareness among local drivers of the importance of driving slowly and safely in communities to protect families. Getting coverage in local media helps to get this important message out, it's great publicity for you, plus kids and parents often love being in the local paper or on the radio! You can use the template press release Brake emails you (once your day is set up) to invite local media, plus you can ring up local journalists and photographers a day or two before to invite them. Just make sure you have parental permission for photos and filming. Contact us at beepbeep@brake.org.uk if you need more advice getting media along.

Easy peasy isn't it? For your free organiser's pack,register now.