Articles Tagged ‘road safety - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake calls for compulsory rural driving lessons for learners

News from Brake
Wednesday 23 August, 2017

Road safety charity Brake is today calling for compulsory lessons on rural roads for learner drivers, as part of a graduated licensing system, to reduce fatalities and serious injuries.

In 2015, the last year for which statistics are available, 120 young drivers lost their lives in crashes - 80 per cent of these occurring on rural roads, 16 per cent on urban roads and four per cent on motorways[1].

Jason Wakeford, Director of Campaigns for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "High speeds, sharp bends, narrow lanes, risky overtaking and the presence of vulnerable road users like cyclists, make rural roads the most dangerous by far. The combination of rural roads and novice drivers is lethal - a staggering 80 per cent of all young car driver fatalities occur in rural locations.

"Brake is calling for a total overhaul of the learning to drive system to help cut fatalities and injuries. A graduated licensing system, including a minimum learning period, mandatory training on rural roads and restrictions for newly-qualified drivers - such as a zero drink-drive limit - will allow new drivers to build up more skills and experience over a longer period of time.

"This approach has dramatically reduced road casualties in countries including Australia and New Zealand and could save some 400 lives a year if implemented in the UK.

"Brake is also calling for a review of rural speed limits and for 'Voluntary Intelligent Speed Adaptation', which helps drivers keep within the limit, to be fitted as standard to new cars. There is also the need for better and more affordable public transport, so fewer young people see starting driving in their teens as a necessity."

[Ends]

Notes to editors:

[1] Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain: Main Results 2015, Department for Transport.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Children’s road safety designs go on display outside schools as Brake announces winners of its national poster competition

News from Brake
Tuesday 19 September 2017

Road safety banners designed by children as young as four have gone on display outside schools as part of a national competition run by Brake and sponsored by Co-op Insurance.

Six designs aimed at spreading awareness about the dangers of speeding were chosen from nearly 7,000 entries submitted to the charity from across the UK as part of Brake’s road safety poster competition.

The competition, which was also supported by the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) and National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), saw 4-11-year olds from 500 schools and community groups take part. The project, which included free resources for teachers, aimed to inspire and engage children about the need for drivers to slow down so kids can walk and cycle to school safely. It then challenged them to create a poster about the dangers of adults speeding - something that puts kids' lives at risk every single day.

One winner and two highly commended entries from two age categories – key stage 1 (4-7), and key stage 2 (7-11) have now been chosen.

The key stage 1 winner is Joseph Air, aged six, from Elmridge Primary School, in Altrincham, Greater Manchester. His “slow down! children around” design has been turned into two large banners that have gone on display outside the school and Altrincham Fire Station.

Alex Muir, aged 11, from Hazel Leys Academy, in Corby, Northamptonshire, is the key stage 2 winner and her “slow down, 20 is plenty” design has now gone on display at the school.

Both children have also won a brand-new bike, helmet and lights, kindly donated by Halfords, and £100 Hobbycraft hamper for themselves, plus £100 of Co-operative Food Store vouchers for their school and a visit to their local fire station. The prizes are being presented by Brake mascot Zak the Zebra today and tomorrow – read on for photo and filming opportunities.

The highly commended children, who have won a banner of their design, visit to their local fire station and £30 Hobbycraft vouchers, are:

Key stage 1- Frank Nowak, aged five, of East Wichel Community Primary School and Nursery, Swindon, and Daisy Lynne Saunders Pearmain, aged four, of Hatfield Heath Primary School, in Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire.

Key stage 2 - Matthew Wright, aged 10, from Dunston Hill Community Primary School, in Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, and Max Mackay, aged 10, from St Peter's Primary School, in Edinburgh.


Dave Nichols
, community engagement manager at Brake, said: “The poster competition was a fantastic opportunity for schools, children and parents to work together to help raise awareness about the dangers of speeding in their local community – something that puts kids’ lives at risk every day. We were really impressed by the high standard of entries we received and the talent and knowledge the children displayed in their designs. A massive congratulations to all our winning children and schools.”

Jen Price, teacher at Elmridge Primary School, said: "At Elmridge, we believe it is very important to educate our pupils about road safety and Brake always has fantastic resources and events to support us with this. It is particularly important to us as our school is located in a heavily built up area where speeding is an issue. Opportunities like the poster competition help to raise awareness of this amongst our pupils, families and the local community. We are delighted that one of our pupil’s entry has been selected as the winner of the poster competition!"

Inga Bain, principal at Hazel Leys Academy, said: "At Hazel Leys Academy children have an excellent knowledge of how to keep safe and how to look after each other. Our students have many talents and we wanted to share these with others. The Brake competition provided an opportunity to showcase what children have learnt as well as demonstrating their creative flair in being able to communicate simple but powerful messages to others. The Academy is sited on a busy road; close by we have shared community spaces, nurseries and local amenities. Being speed aware helps to keep every child free from harm as well as keeping the whole community safe; taking part in the competition reinforced the importance of sticking to the speed limit for our children and adults."

Charles Offord, director of distribution and marketing at Co-op Insurance said: “It’s been fantastic to see so many children as young as four take part in an activity which aims to educate children on a very serious subject in such a fun and engaging way. We were delighted to be involved in the competition and we look forward to seeing how the children respond to the winning posters.”

Sean Bone-Knell, National Fire Chiefs Council road safety lead, said: “The dangers of speeding are ever present on our roads every day and ensuring our children are aware of the dangers and are able to assist in encouraging drivers to slow down has to be a positive action. The quality of the final posters and the thinking behind their work is first class and I can see how these pictures will make any motorist think about their actions and raise awareness in the community. A huge thanks to Brake and the NPCC for this collaborative campaign and well done to all who took part.”

Chief Constable Anthony Bangham, National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for roads policing, said:“As some of the excellent winners of this competition have shown, we have to educate everyone about the dangers that all road users face from dangerous driving and excessive speed. Speeding is still a significant factor in far too many road incidents and that has to change. I want to encourage everyone who took part in this competition to keep talking about the dangers and raising awareness, to help the police keep our roads safe for future generations.”


About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths, serious injuries and pollution occurring on our roads every day. We work to make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake's vision is a world where there are zero road deaths and injuries, and people can get around in ways that are safe, sustainable, healthy and fair. We do this by pushing for legislative change through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Co-op Insurance

Co-op Insurance is a UK-based general insurer that operates principally within the personal lines segments of the motor and home insurance markets. The Co op Insurance underwrites the majority of business written, supplemented with some small lines of business where The Co op Insurance acts as a distributor or has a 100% reinsurance arrangement in place.

With more than 1.18m customers, The Co op Insurance is committed to ‘Doing the Right Thing’ and always strives to treat customers and members fairly. The Co op Insurance pioneered the way in lowering the insurance premiums of young drivers as the first major insurer to launch a pay how you drive telematics insurance product for young drivers in 2011. Since launching the scheme, The Co op Insurance has saved its young drivers more than £7.2 million in their first year of driving.

About NFCC

The National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) provides clear, professional leadership while representing the wider sector on matters such as professional standards, operational guidance, research and sharing best practice. The NFCC also leads and delivers key national workstreams through its Coordination Committees and aims to drive improvement and development across UK Fire and Rescue Services, while supporting strong leadership.

About NPCC

The NPCC brings police forces in the UK together to help policing coordinate operations, reform, improve and provide value for money. Some of the biggest threats to public safety are national and international. We have a collective strength by coordinating the operational response across forces. Crime is changing and so are citizens’ needs and expectations of policing. We’re constantly adapting and reforming to keep people safe. Public confidence and support is essential. We're always striving to improve the way we work and learn from when things go wrong to build people's confidence in us. It’s more important than ever that our service is efficient and effective, providing best value for money.

Driver gender

Key facts

  • Men account for 73% of all worldwide road traffic deaths, three times the rate of women;
  • In Britain men account for 74% road traffic deaths, 70% of serious injuries and 59% slight injuries on the roads;
  • Men drive twice as many miles per year, on average, than women;
  • In the UK, 80% of men and 67% of women have a valid driving licence;
  • In Britain men make up 82% of cycling deaths and serious injuries, young male cyclists are the most over-represented age group, accounting for 30% of all cycling casualties;
  • Female pedestrians account for over half of journeys by foot in the UK (52%), but men make up the majority of pedestrian casualties in the UK (57%);
  • In Britain 95% of convictions for deaths caused by dangerous driving are against men;
  • In the UK, the number of male drivers reported having driven under the influence of drugs, was four times higher than the number of female drivers who admitted to the same offence.[1]

Introduction

Road casualty statistics show a big difference between men and women when it comes to safety on the roads. Men are far more likely to be killed or seriously injured on roads than women, as pedestrians, cyclists and as drivers, and at all ages. This applies not just in the UK, but in the majority of countries worldwide: globally, men account for 73% of all road traffic deaths, with an overall rate almost three times that of women.

Some of this difference can be explained by the fact that on average men travel greater distances; but studies have shown that even when this is compensated for, a striking difference can still be seen, both in terms of the number of men involved in crashes, and in the types of crashes in which they are involved [2]. The gender difference is also far more pronounced when looking at serious casualties than when looking at slight casualties, showing men have much greater involvement in serious crashes that result in death and serious injury: in Britain 74% of road deaths are men, compared to 70% of serious injuries, and 59% of slight injuries [3].

Attitudinal and behavioural studies show that part of the reason for this difference is that men tend to have a different mind-set when it comes to risk, and this appears to be borne out in men tending to report and display more aggressive and dangerous driving behaviours [4].

Travel habits

On average women travel more often than men, but men travel further across all modes of transport. In England, men travel an average of 7,200 miles per year compared to the 5,800 miles covered by women, with the biggest difference being in terms of travel for work purposes, where men travel over twice as far on average [5].

When it comes to car travel, the average distance covered as a driver is lower for women of all ages, and the distance travelled as a car passenger is lower for men of all ages [6]. Men drive around twice as many miles per year, on average, than women (4,209 miles against 2,291 miles in 2013), with the difference in distance more marked among older drivers [7].  

On average, 80% of men and 67% of women in the UK hold a driving licence. These percentages vary in rural areas, however, where roughly equal numbers of men and women hold a driving licence until the age of 60, at which point men once again predominate in licence holder statistics [8].

The number of women drivers has grown considerably since the 1970s, when male drivers outnumbered women drivers by three to one. The number of women drivers is expected to grow further in the future. Employment rates among women are increasing, as are incomes, while rates among men are falling. There is a correlation between employment rates and use of cars. Access to cars has been declining among men, but increasing almost universally among women [9].

In other forms of transport on the UK’s roads information from the Department for Transport show that:

  • In the UK, very few trips (2% of all journeys) are made by bicycle. The majority of those journeys (79%) are carried out by male cyclists. In Britain men make up 82% of cycling deaths and serious injuries, the majority of those killed and seriously injured while cycling. Young male cyclists are the most overrepresented age group, accounting for 30% of all cycling casualties [10].
  • Walking accounts for 22% of all journeys in the UK, on average women make more walking trips than men: of the 11.6 billion miles walked in 2013, female pedestrians accounted for over half (52%). Across all severities, men make up the majority of pedestrian casualties in the UK (57%). Young male pedestrians (between the age of 10 and 19) are the most over-represented casualty group, accounting for 22% of pedestrians killed and seriously injured in 2013 but only 15% of the total miles walked during that period [11].
  • Women make more bus trips than men at all ages, whereas 57% of men compared to 53% of women use trains instead of the roads [12].

Driver attitudes

In 2012 Brake surveyed 2,085 male and 2,291 female drivers and motorbike riders, questioning their attitudes to speed, drink- and drug-driving, distractions, testing and enforcement. It found that men are more likely to hold a range of attitudes that might be associated with dangerous or risk-taking behaviours, such as:

  • 51% of men think they are safer than the average driver, compared to 39% of women;
  • Women are more likely than men to worry about someone close to them being killed in a road crash;
  • Men are more likely to likely to think the speed limit is 'too slow' while female drivers are more likely to think it 'too fast' on motorways, dual carriageways and rural roads;
  • More men than women think the penalty for speeding is too harsh, while more women than men think it is too lenient. [13]

Male drivers tend to be more confident than women, even if the statistics regarding road deaths and injuries do not back up their confidence; for example, men are much more likely than women to think that their safety behind the wheel is above average [14].

Driver behaviours

A 2015 study demonstrated that it is possible to recognise the gender of drivers with a high degree of accuracy by analysing driving data. In a virtual driving simulation covering a 23.7km route; variables relating to speed, acceleration, lane departure, braking force, gas pedal pressure and steering angle were collected. Analysis of the data showed that acceleration was the most important predictor of driver gender, followed by speed, gas pedal actuation and measures related to the angle of the steering wheel.Aggressive driver behaviours, including sharp acceleration and speeding, was more closely associated with male drivers assessed during the study. Although the study was able to recognise driver gender from driving data, it concludes that the reasons for these gender differences in driving patterns remain unclear and should be investigated further [15].

In 1998 research by the University of Reading and the AA Foundation for Safety Research looked at the involvement of men and women in crashes to see if there were any patterns. The main study focused on speed; close following; gap acceptance; overtaking and hazard perception; and was followed up by a questionnaire on driver experience, sensation seeking, and attitudes to drugs and alcohol [16].

The study found that men were more likely to be involved in crashes on bends (a type of crash that is linked to speed choice); in crashes while overtaking; and especially in crashes that occurred during the hours of darkness. In all three types of crash, younger men had significantly more crashes than young women of the same age, with this difference decreasing with age. Of the situations looked at in the study, the only one where women were more likely than males to be involved in a crash was at junctions. This was particularly noticeable in right-turn crashes, with a difference of about 7% between men and women in young drivers. The number of right-turn crashes increased with age for both men and women [17].

A third study assessing driving style and accidents also hypothesised the concept of gender differences in driving styles. This was supported in that men scored higher on risky, angry and high velocity driving styles, demonstrating that angry, risky, high velocity and dissociative styles were associated with self-report of accidents. Women scored higher on dissociative, anxious and patient driving styles [18].

Driving offences

Data on driving convictions shows that men are more often than not the perpetrators as well as the victims: an overwhelming 95% of [deaths caused by] dangerous driving [convictions] in Britain are against men. Men are also more likely to commit a range of specific offences, including speeding and drink-driving [19].

Speeding is a major cause of death and serious injury on the road. In 2006 Home Office figures showed that 82% of speeding offences were committed by men [20]. A study in 2006 showed that women in the UK had a more positive attitude towards safety cameras than men, presenting a better awareness of their road safety benefits and collision-reducing potential, than their male counterparts [21].

Men are more likely to drink and drive than woman. In 2014/15, 8.1 per cent of male drivers admitted to driving when over the legal alcohol limit at least once. In comparison, 4.2 per cent of women drivers admitted to the same offence. This difference is statistically significant [22].

However, a 2014 study has revealed a recent increase in the number of women convicted of drink-driving (16% between 2006 and 2012) compared to the number of men convicted, which has begun to fall (24%). Women over the age of 40 were shown, proportionally, to have the highest rate of being caught under the influence than all other groups assessed, indicating a potential shift away from the more traditional understandings of drink-drivers [23].

Drug driving is more prevalent among men than women. In 2014/15, 1.4 percent of male drivers reported having driven under the influence of drugs, four times the number of female drivers (0.3%) who admitted to the same offence during the period [24].

More information

Brake Professional – library of recent global research: http://www.brakepro.org/library/road-safety-research/10-library/111-gender

End notes 

[1] WHO, World report on road traffic injury prevention, 2004
[2] Health and Safety Executive, The contribution of individual forces to driver behaviour: Implications for managing work-related road safety, 2002
[3] Department for Transport, Reported Road Casualties Great Britain Annual Report: 2014
[4] SARTRE 4, European road users’ risk perception and mobility, 2012
[5] National Travel Survey, Car travel factsheet: 2014, 2015             
[6] National Travel Survey, Car travel factsheet: 2014, 2015
[7]Department for Transport, Understanding the drivers of road transport: current trends in and factors behind road use, 2015             
[8] National Travel Survey, Car travel factsheet: 2014, 2015
[9] Department for Transport, Understanding the drivers of road transport: current trends in and factors behind road use, 2015             
[10] Department for Transport, Facts on Pedal Cyclists, 2015
[11] Department for Transport, Facts on Pedestrians, 2015
[12] Department for Transport, Rail Trends: Great Britain 2010/11, DfT Rail Statistics Factsheet No. 1, 2012
[13] Brake, Men vs. Women, 2012    
[14] B. Degraeve et al., Social representation associated with men and women drivers among French adolescents and adults: effects of the perceiver’s age, sex and socio-economic status, 2015
[15] Clemens Stachl & Markus Bühner, Show me how you Drive and I’ll Tell you who you are Recognizing Gender Using Automotive Driving Parameters, Department of Psychology/Statistics and Evaluation, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Leopoldstr. 13, 80802 Munich, Germany Available online 23 October 2015      
[16] Road Safety Foundation, Male and female drivers: how are they different?, 1998
[17] Road Safety Foundation, Male and female drivers: how are they different?, 1998     
[18] Westerman, S. J., Haigney, D. (2000), ‘Individual differences in driver stress, error and violation’, Personality and individual differences, 29, 981-998
[19] Department for Transport, Reported Road Casualties Great Britain Annual Report: 2014
[20] Brake, Men vs. Women, 2012    
[21] Corbett, C. and Caramlau, I. (2006) ‘Gender differences in responses to speed cameras: typology findings and implications for road safety’, in Criminology and Criminal Justice: An international journal 6(4), 411-433.
[22] Department for Transport, Reported Road Casualties Great Britain Annual Report: 2014
[23] Beuret, K., Corbett, C. and Ward, H, ‘Women and alcohol: drinking among British women and its impact on their pedestrian and driving activity’, 2014
[25] Department for Transport, Reported Road Casualties Great Britain Annual Report: 2014

Finalists announced for Brake’s Fleet Safety Awards 2017

News from Brake
Immediate issue: Monday 17 July 2017
professional@brake.org.uk

Finalists announced for Brake’s Fleet Safety Awards 2017

- Winners to be crowned at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole on Thursday 28 September 2017

Safety-conscious organisations from across the globe have made it through to the final stage of Brake’s Fleet Safety Awards 2017.

The road safety charity received a record number of first-time entries this year and now more than 70 organisations are in with a chance of winning one of 15 prestigious awards.

The annual event, sponsored by ARI and ProVision, recognises the achievements of fleet operators and suppliers who are working hard to reduce road crashes involving at-work drivers. This year’s finalists include household names such as FedEX, Royal Mail Group, and British Gas, as well as smaller companies including TMJ Interiors, AbbVie and Reflex .

A full shortlist (details below) has now been released for each category, and winners will be announced at a gala dinner on Thursday 28 September 2017, at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole, Birmingham.

Tickets are on sale for just £150 per person and there are still some sponsorship opportunities available. Full details are available at www.fleetsafetyawards.com.

Katie Shephard, development director, at Brake, says: “Congratulations to all organisations who have been shortlisted this year. The standard was exceptionally high this year and we’re looking forward to working with our external judges to select some well deserving winners. I’d encourage companies across the industry to attend our Awards ceremony in September and help us celebrate best practice.”

Jason Chamberlain, sales and marketing director at ARI, says: “We are hugely proud to continue our partnership with Brake as sponsor of the 2017 Fleet Safety Awards. As a former Brake Award winner ourselves for our Riskmaster driver management product, we have the utmost respect for the level of dedication shown by Brake and all potential award entrants from the fleet industry, working tirelessly to help realise Brake’s vision of zero road deaths and serious injuries.”

Mervyn O’Callaghan, Co-Founder and Managing Director at ProVision CameraMatics, says: “We are delighted to see such an excellent array of companies highlighting their technologies and initiatives that increase safety for both commercial drivers and the public that share our roads. In our view there is no greater goal in the field of automotive technology than that of saving lives. We would like to extend our very best wishes and good luck to all entrants for a successful and enjoyable event.”

The 2017 shortlists are as follow:
Company Driver Safety Award (small fleet), sponsored by Fleetmaster
• AbbVie Ltd
• Carey Worldwide Chauffeur Services
• Iron Mountain
• Jet Plant Hire Limited
• National Vehicle Distribution Ltd
• TMJ Interiors Ltd

Company Driver Safety Award (medium fleet), sponsored by Fleetmaster
• Bibby Distribution
• FedEx Express Europe
• Gateshead Council
• Glasgow City Council
• Novus Property Solutions Ltd
• Reynolds

Company Driver Safety Award (large fleet), sponsored by Fleetmaster
• Anglian Water
• Atos
• British Gas
• Kelly Group
• Skanska
• SSE and Applied Driving Techniques
• telent Technology Services Ltd

Eco Fleet Award, sponsored by Telogis
• Bibby Distribution
• CNG Fuels
• Gateshead Council
• Lightfoot
• VolkerRail

Fleet Safety Analysis and Action Award, sponsored by e-Driving Fleet
• Balfour Beatty
• FM Conway Ltd
• Iron Mountain
• Jacobs and Applied Driving Techniques
• Morrison Utility Services
• Pollock (scotrans) Ltd
• Royal Mail Group
• telent Technology Services Ltd

Fleet Safety Innovation Award, sponsored by Johnson + Johnson
• Auto Windscreens
• Carillion Fleet Management
• Clearview Intelligence Limited
• FTA Van Excellence
• Intelligent Telematics and Tesco.com
• McGee
• ProVision
• Reflex Vans
• Renault Trucks

Fleet Safety Partnership Award
• Anglian Water and Ctrack
• Aster Group and Perfect Circle Management Ltd
• British Gas and Fleetmaster Group
• Glasgow City Council and Gallagher Bassett
• Johnson & Johnson and AIP

• Phillips 66

• Pollock (scotrans) Ltd 
• telent Technology Services Ltd and Lex Autolease

 Fleet Safety Product Award, sponsored by QBE

• British Gas
• Checkedsafe
• DriverFocus
• r2c Online
• Reflex Vans
• Renault Trucks

Fleet Safety Product Award (in-vehicle technology), sponsored by QBE
• BigChange
• Lightfoot
• Mobileye
• ProVision
• Safety Shield Systems
• SmartWitness
• Teletrac Navman
• VisionTrack

Global Road Safety Award
• Iron Mountain
• Johnson & Johnson
• Kunhadi
• Mobileye

Road Safety in the Community Award, sponsored by Ocado
• Agro Merchants Lurgan - Sawyers Transport
• Conquip Engineering Group
• Co-op Insurance
• Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS)
• Licence Bureau
• Stephensons Solicitors LLP

Safe Vehicles Award, sponsored by Checkpoint
• FCA Group (Alpha Romeo)
• Instarmac Group
• Jet Plant Hire Limited
• Morrison Utility Services
• Reynolds
• Skanska

Road Risk Manager of the Year Award, sponsored by Licence Bureau
• Rory Morgan, Iron Mountain
• James Mitchell, Arriva
• Robert Lindsay, Balfour Beatty
• Andrew Drewary, Road Risk Manager for Broadspire, by Crawford & Company
• Richard Green, Anglian Water
• Mark Bromhall, Royal Mail Group
• Alison Moriarty, Skanska

Kevin Storey Award for Outstanding Commitment to Road Safety, sponsored by Arriva
• Announced on the night

[ENDS]

Notes to editors

About Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on Twitter, Facebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About ARI
ARI is one of the UK’s leading fleet management providers, delivering state-of the art solutions for driver risk management, funding, fleet maintenance, accident and daily rental to customers across a wide range of industries and sectors. ARI’s industry-leading driver risk management system, Riskmaster, was awarded the Fleet Safety Product Award at Brake’s 2015 Fleet Safety Awards for its contribution to driver and risk management, with ARI customers experiencing significant reductions in road incident frequency and severity.

About ProVision
ProVision is the leader in CameraMatics solutions, delivering products that allow fleet managers to reduce fleet risk, increase driver safety and comply with growing governance and compliance regulations.

Vehicle Tracking and Telematics solutions answered the challenge of improving fleet efficiencies in the last two decades. However, the world has changed to one where managing risk and meeting compliance needs presents a greater burden to fleets than ever before.

A new evolution in vehicle video and data was needed and ProVision has met that need with CameraMatics. This merges 4 key technologies: video input technologies, such as cameras and video-based scanners, smart processing systems, communications systems and unique algorithmic IP.

ProVision's CameraMatics technology delivers advanced, remotely-accessible IoT solutions that help protect fleets, while also increasing their efficiencies. The foundation of the ProVision system are our vehicle camera systems comprising HD-quality cameras with 3G/4G remotely accessible smart DVRs. These systems can be extended with ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) such as Lane Departure Warnings, Forward Collision Warnings, Driver Fatigue, Smoking and Mobile Phone Use Warnings. Additionally, a 360 Degree Bird's Eye View system can be implemented to give a complete top-down view of everything around the vehicle. Unlike non-CameraMatics systems that simply warn the driver of issues, the ProVision system logs all the incidents and even alerts the fleet manager, who can then take corrective and protective measures. Finally, our software suite includes desktop and mobile apps for monitoring fleet vehicles & data, and driver apps for logging vehicle checks and reporting accidents.

This full package of data truly enhances and protects fleets like never before and it's the CameraMatics difference that makes ProVision the global leaders in fleet technology innovation.
Find out more at https://www.ProVisionCameraMatics.com

Industry and NGOs call for urgent UK action on vehicle safety standards

News from Brake
Monday 14 August, 2017
news@brake.org.uk

A coalition of industry groups and NGOs have called on the UK Government to pledge its support for European Commission plans to improve new vehicle safety standards.

In a joint letter and briefing to Roads Minister Jesse Norman MP, Brake, the Association of Car Fleet Operators, Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, European Transport Safety Council, Living Streets, the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety and RoadPeace say improved minimum vehicle safety standards are needed to reduce deaths and serious injuries on UK roads.

Last year the European Commission published a list of 19 safety technologies which it is considering to make mandatory. In its letter, the group urges the Minister to support these measures and champion continued improvements under UK legislation following Brexit.

The technologies under consideration for new cars include Automated Emergency Braking, Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA), an overridable system for helping drivers stick to speed limits, as well as updates to crash testing requirements to protect occupants and people outside vehicles. The EC is also considering measures specifically for lorries, to protect people and foot and bicycles, including improvements to lorry drivers’ direct vision (what they can see out their windows).

Vehicle standards were last updated in 2009 and significant advances in vehicle technology, which have taken place since then, "make it prudent to raise the bar and implement further cost effective life-saving safety measures as standard," the group says.

The coalition concludes that improved vehicle safety standards are "crucial to ensure the effective delivery of the 'safe system' approach adopted by Britain, driving towards the ultimate target of zero road deaths and serious injuries."

[Ends]

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

New figures show Highway Code falls short on stopping distances

News from Brake
Tuesday 25 July, 2017
news@brake.org.uk

Stopping distances in the UK Highway Code should be increased because drivers' thinking time has been underestimated, according to figures obtained by Brake, the road safety charity.

Brake asked TRL (Transport Research Laboratory) to provide evidence on the time taken by car drivers to perceive, recognise and react to emergency situations. TRL referred to academic literature and concluded that the average thinking time is 1.5 seconds − more than double the 0.67 seconds set out in the Highway Code (see table 1).

This means that average total stopping distance − including thinking and braking distance − is an extra 2.75 car lengths (11 metres) at 30mph and an extra 3.75 car lengths (15 metres) at 40mph compared with the distances used in the Code. This difference rises to an additional 6.25 car lengths (25 metres) at 70mph.

Table 1: overall average stopping distances (average car length = 4m)

Speed

20mph

30 mph

40 mph

50 mph

60 mph

70 mph

Brake/TRL study

19m

34m

51m

71m

95m

121m

UK Highway Code

12m

23m

36m

53m

73m

96m

Difference

7m

11m

15m

18m

22m

25m

 

See a graphic showing the differences here.

Brake is calling on the Government to increase stopping distances in its next update to the Highway Code.

Jason Wakeford, spokesman for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "These figures suggest stopping distances taught to new drivers in the Highway Code fall woefully short. Even though car braking technology has improved in recent years, the majority of the overall stopping distance at most speeds is actually made up of the time taken to perceive the hazard and react.

"The research shows that average thinking time is more than double that set out in the Highway Code. A true understanding of how long it takes to stop a car in an emergency is one of the most important lessons for new drivers. Understanding true average thinking time reminds all drivers how far their car will travel before they begin to brake  − as well as highlighting how any distraction in the car which extends this time, like using a mobile phone, could prove fatal.

"Brake is calling on the Government to increase the stopping distances in the Highway Code as a matter of urgency."

[ENDS]

Notes to editors:

Cuerden, R. (2017). The mechanics of emergency braking. Transport Research Laboratory: http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/pdf/The-mechanics-of-emergency-braking-2017.pdf

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Police Superintendent apologises for using mobile phone at the wheel

News from Brake

19 July 2017
news@brake.org.uk

Superintendent Mark Thornton, from Cleveland Police, has apologised for driving while using his mobile phone after being confronted with video evidence by The Northern Echo newspaper.

Commenting on the story, Jason Wakeford, spokesman for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Illegal mobile phone use at the wheel is a growing menace and a major threat to lives on our roads.

"The police have to lead by example and so it's disappointing to hear of this incident. We note Superintendent Mark Thornton has apologised for his actions and we urge Cleveland Police to now conduct a full investigation.

"Research shows that using a phone behind the wheel affects reaction times as much as drink driving, increasing the chances of a deadly crash. Brake urges motorists to put mobiles on silent and out of reach when in the car, to stay focused on the road."

[ENDS]

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.