Articles Tagged ‘road safety week - Brake the road safety charity’

‘Drive less, live more’ campaign launched by Brake, as devastating UK-wide health effects of driving are revealed

Monday, 23 November 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

Contact 01484 550067 / 07976 069 159, or e: news@brake.org.uk

  • Released today: 75% of drivers surveyed think people in the UK use their cars too much
  • Air pollution is estimated to kill 52,500 people in the UK each year
  • 43% of adults in England don’t meet the recommended 150 minutes of exercise per week. Cycling or a brisk walk to work can meet these recommendations.
  • Five deathsand 64serious injuries happen daily on UK roads, up 4% on the previous year

A national campaign launched today (23 November) by the charity Brake at the start of Road Safety Week calls on drivers to drive less, live more. The campaign aims to make roads safer, especially for people on foot and bike; save money; make communities more pleasant; protect the environment; and improve public health. Media are invited to campaign launch events – see box below.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners AIG and Specsavers today reveal statistics confirming the devastating effects on health and wellbeing of driving, including the extent of air pollution, the shocking number of deaths it causes, and levels of ‘inactivity’ across different parts of the UK.

A map of the UK showing statistics for each local authority is now live at roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessmap for your analysis.

Brake, Specsavers and AIG are also today launching results of a survey of 1,000 driving adults (23 Nov):

  • Eight in 10 (79%) admit to driving on journeys that could be made on foot, bicycle or by public transport.
  • A large majority of people surveyed see overuse of cars as a problem, but point the fingers at others: 75% think people use their cars too much, but only 30% think they are guilty of this.
  • 85% of those surveyed believe people overall should reduce car use, for a variety of reasons: 52% to reduce air pollution and noise, and half (50%) to protect the environment and stop climate change.
  • Significant numbers agreed their driving was detrimental to their own/family’s health (31%), and their family’s finances (28%).
  • The most commonly cited factor people said would help persuade them to drive less (37%) was making public transport in their area more frequent, accessible and convenient.

Full results are at the bottom of this release.

Filming, photo and interview opportunities:

Media are invited to attend the main launch in London or media calls across the UK in Glasgow, Bristol, and York. Find out more fromnews@brake.org.uk.

Main launch event:

WHERE:Horse Guards Parade, London SW1A 2AX   WHEN: 8:30am-11:00am 23 November

FILMING/PHOTOS:Met Police and their Cycle Safety Team will be running exchanging places, with cyclists and pedestrians given the opportunity to sit in an HGV and learn about their blind spots first hand. There will also be a spinning class with London’s Santander bikes, demonstration of BMW Electric bikes, Cemex’s new Econic truck which provides better safety for cyclists, and HaveBike's mobile cycle workshop.

INTERVIEWS:Brake campaigns director, Gary Rae (07748 674851), Met Police spokesperson Inspector Dave Osborne (07921 067 383), vox pops with members of the public.

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHS from the event will be provided from mid-afternoon on the same day. Contactnews@brake.org.uk to confirm expected upload time. To set up pre-record filming and interviews with Brake, emailnews@brake.org.uk.

 

Why drive less, live more?

Every day five people die on UK roads, and 64 more are seriously injured – every one causes needless devastation, trauma and suffering, which Brake witnesses through its victim care services [1][2]. The vast majority of these serious casualties, which went up by 4% last year, are down to driver error.

Brake believes road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are important. It’s about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing everything we can to protect ourselves and people around us. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all if you can.

It’s common for people to habitually walk the few metres from their front door to their car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A quarter of car journeys (23%) are less than two miles [3]. People who walk or cycle often have to face busy, noisy streets, full of pollution and fast traffic. Is this the way we want it?

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only helps to make our streets safer, more pleasant and less polluted, it has personal benefits too. It can save families a lot of money, help people live healthier, more active lives, reduce stress and illness, and help people connect with their communities.

That’s why Brake is asking everyone to consider how they use roads, and to see if they can drive less, live more, and walk, cycle or use public transport instead, to help make our roads and communities safer, happier, healthier and less polluted places.

Members of the public can show their support for the drive less, live more campaign by:

Gary Rae, director of communications and campaigns at Brake, said: “Our Road Safety Week theme of ‘drive less, live more’ makes clear the link between improving road safety, preventing casualties, protecting people and the planet, and our choice of transport. We understand that not everyone has freedom of choice in the way they travel, hence we continue to have a strong year-round focus campaigning for a safer environment for walking and cycling through our GO 20 campaign. We also support the efforts of partner organisations that are campaigning for better public transport. But our main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

“Road Safety Week has become the most crucial fixture in our calendar for raising public awareness of road safety, and it has also become a crucial fixture for many educators, road safety professionals, and employers around the country too. We believe this year’s theme is a critical one for all of us, providing a chance to show how road safety is a bigger issue than many people think.”

Specsavers co-founder, Dame Mary Perkins, said: “Specsavers is proud to continue to work with Brake to support Road Safety Week, a timely reminder of the dangers on our roads. As winter approaches, bad weather and dark nights impact on visibility affecting pedestrians, cyclists and drivers alike. But we hope this doesn't discourage people from walking and cycling at this time of year. We would urge all road users to ensure they have regular eye tests in order to keep both themselves and their loved ones safe and to cut down on the amount of preventable collisions on our roads.”

Stuart Sutherland, Casualty Profit Centre Manager at AIG, commented: “We are delighted to be supporting Brake in the dedicated work it does to promote road safety in the UK. This partnership is one of a number of road safety initiatives across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa as part of AIG’s Together for Safer Roads objectives. It reflects our commitment as a company to working around the world alongside partners in business, government and the community to make our roads safer and prevent unnecessary death and injury.”

More facts about driving and its impact:

  • By 2040 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 39% compared to 2010 and traffic delays by 61% [4].
  • Nearly a third (27%) of UK CO2 emissions come from road transport [5]. Air pollution is a major killer: there are an estimated 29,000 deaths from particulate matter pollution in the UK [6], 5,000 of which are attributable to road transport [7], and an additional 23,500 deaths from NO2 [8]. Much of the UK still exceeds EU standards on NO2 emissions; and in those areas where levels are too high, 80% of emissions are due to road transport, mostly cars and vans [9].
  • Fear of traffic can discourage people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. A Brake survey found one in three non-cyclists (35%) would cycle their commute if routes were safer [10].
  • Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11].
  • One in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of children are now driven to school [12], yet the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles [13]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [14]. Children who are encouraged to walk, cycle, scoot or skateboard to school tend to engage more with their community, stay healthy, and arrive alert, relaxed and ready to start the day [15].
  • One in four adults in England are obese and a further 37% are overweight [16]. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year [17]. The Chief Medical Officer recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate physical exercise a week, yet 43% of adults in England don't do this [18].
  • Incorporating activity like walking, jogging and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight [19], and can help guard against asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers [20].
  • People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have a lower BMI and healthier bodyweight [21].
  • Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs [22]. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling [23].

Notes for editors:

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week
Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors AIG and Specsavers.

AIG
American International Group, Inc. (AIG) is a leading global insurance organisation serving customers in more than 100 countries and jurisdictions. AIG companies serve commercial, institutional, and individual customers through one of the most extensive worldwide property-casualty networks of any insurer. In addition, AIG companies are leading providers of life insurance and retirement services in the United States. AIG common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the Tokyo Stock Exchange.

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country

End notes:

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2014 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2015

[3] National Travel Survey 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[4] Road Transport Forecasts 2013, Department for Transport

[5] Local authority carbon dioxide emissions estimates 2012, Department of Energy & Climate Change

[6] Estimating Local Mortality Burdens associated with Particulate Air Pollution, Public Health England

[7] Public Health Impacts of Combustion Emissions in the United Kingdom, MIT

[8] Tackling nitrogen dioxide in our towns and cities, Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs

[9] Tackling nitrogen dioxide in our towns and cities, Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs

[10] Commuters call for safer streets for cycling, to enable more to get on their bikes, Brake

[11] National Travel Survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013

[12] Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[13] Donabie, Anna, Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[14] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014

[15] The school run, Sustrans

[16] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, NHS, 2013

[17] Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd ed), Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[18] Public Health Outcomes Framework, Public Health England, 2014

[19] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[20] Benefits of exercise, NHS, 2015

[21] Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index: population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[22] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[23] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Full survey results:

Survey of 1,000 UK adult drivers carried out by Surveygoo on behalf of Brake, September 2015:

Q.1 On average, do you think people in the UK use their cars? (tick one)

Far too much  28%

A bit too much 47%

About the right amount 25%

A bit too little  0%

Far too little 0%

Q.2 On average, do you think you personally use your car? (tick one)

Far too much 6%

A bit too much 25%

About the right amount 57%

A bit too little 10%

Far too little 3%

Q.3 Do you think people in the UK should reduce their car use, and if so, why? (tick as many as you think apply)

Yes, to protect the environment and stop climate change 50%

Yes, to make roads safer, especially for people on foot and bike 31%

Yes, to save money 40%

Yes, to improve public health 39%

Yes, to reduce air pollution and noise 52%

Yes, to help support local businesses 11%

Yes, to make their communities more pleasant and interact with people more 25%

No 15%

Q.4 Do you think you PERSONALLY should reduce your car use, and if so, why? (tick as many as you think apply)

Yes, to protect the environment and stop climate change 28%

Yes, to make roads safer, especially for people on foot and bike 16%

Yes, to save money 36%

Yes, to improve public health 21%

Yes, to reduce air pollution and noise 26%

Yes, to help support local businesses 6%

Yes, to make their communities more pleasant and interact with people more 13%

No 38%

Q.5 Do you think your own car use has any negative effects on you and/or your family, and if so, what? (tick as many as you think apply)

Yes, it is making me/us less healthy 31%

Yes, it is putting me/us in danger on the roads 12%

Yes, it is costing me/us too much money 28%

Yes, it is making me/us less likely to meet people and engage with the local community 11%

No 46%

Q.6 Do you think your own car use has any negative effects on society, and if so, what? (tick as many as you think apply)

Yes, it is contributing to making people less healthy because it creates pollution 38%

Yes, it is contributing to making people less healthy because it discourages them from walking or cycling 30%

Yes, it is contributing to putting people at risk on the roads 14%

Yes, it is contributing to costing society money, for instance because of road building costs or delays caused by congestion  21%

Yes, it is contributing to making our community less pleasant and/or sociable 15%

No 39%

Q.7 Would any of the following persuade you to use your car less? (tick as many as apply)

Driving cost more 18%

Public transport in my area was cheaper 32%

Public transport in my area was more accessible, frequent and convenient 37%

Walking and cycling in my area was safer and more pleasant 23%

More was done to convince me driving was harmful to me and my family 9%

More was done to convince me driving was harmful to society 4%

More was done to convince me driving was harmful to the environment 5%

Other people used their cars less 8%

None of the above - I will not/cannot use my car less 35%

Q.8 Choose the statement that most applies to you (tick one)

I never make journeys by car I could make by foot, bike or public transport instead 22%

I often make journeys by car I could make by foot, bike or public transport instead  18%

I rarely make journeys by car I could make by foot, bike or public transport instead 29%

I sometimes make journeys by car I could make by foot, bike or public transport instead 32%

 

Brake and Morrison Utility Services

Brake have supported Morrison Utility Services across a number of their contracts, adding content and expertise to their driver training sessions. 

After being involved with a number Road Safety Week campaigns, Morrison Utility Services came on board as partners in 2014 with the ambition of incorporating road risk into their health and safety remit. Morrison Utility Services asked Brake to add support to their autumn/winter campaign and talk directly to drivers and office staff across 6 different sites. Brake delivered a presentation on the risks associated with drink and drug driving and also provided guidance reports on winter driving and driver tiredness. These workshops were eventually delivered to members of the Morrison board of directors and senior health and safety executives. 

Brake annual reception, January 2017

Speech by Mary Williams OBE, chief executive, Brake, annual reception for the charity, Westminster, 25 January 2017

To quote Martin Luther King, “The time is always right to do what is right.”

Time is an unruly beast however. 

It has a habit of speeding up and slowing down.

For busy families, and busy workers, in our busy world, it moves fast. The temptation to multi-task; to drive while on a smart phone, to break speed limits, to take the car rather than cycle and save the planet, are life-threatening, climate endangering behaviours fuelled by pressures of time. They cause drivers to prioritise ‘in the moment’, wrongly, and to devastating effect.

Time can stop in a moment.

Time grinds to a halt when someone is killed or seriously injured in a road crash. Our routines are suspended. Suddenly, our attention is focussed.

It’s beautifully summed up in WH Auden’s famous poem so often used at funerals.  “Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone. Scribble on the sky the message “he is dead”.”

Yet, consumed by grief and distress, we are given a strange and precious gift. We are given the gift of sight. We can see what matters above all – people and life. As Auden puts it: “he was my north, my south, my east, my west.”

Whether we can see it or not, the time is always right to put humanity first.

“The time is always right to do what is right.” 

There are so many affected families who work alongside Brake, bravely, to fight for humanity. To fight for what others cannot see through the haze of the day to day.

To fight for appropriately grave sentences for drivers who kill and injure through wanton actions:

use of smart phones and other on-board screens.

drink and drug driving.

speeding, or driving unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured.

knowingly driving a mechanically unfit vehicle or driving tired.  

Campaigning takes time – frustrating amounts of time. Brake has been fighting for tougher sentences for more than 20 years. Last year, working with affected families, we elevated our Roads to Justice campaign in the media.

The current government consultation road traffic offences provides a real and urgent opportunity to redress paltry sentencing.

There are so many campaigns that Brake has found, to our cost, take inordinate time, when the road ahead seems so clear.

There are so many campaigns we have consistently supported, are still outstanding and that this government has a chance to resolve. 

A reduction in the drink drive limit, to stop our country being infamous for having the highest limit in Europe.

The government has the public with them. More than three quarters of drivers we surveyed in partnership with Direct Line think our limit is too high.

Approved testing devices to catch MDMA and cocaine drivers.

20mph limits as a default for built up roads.

A country-wide network of segregated cycle lanes that connect places, enabling, fast, healthy, zero emission transport.

Prioritisation of pedestrianisation, with wide and safe pavements, crossing places and livable traffic free spaces, enabling people to move our bodies, talk to our children, meet our neighbours. Invigorating communities.

A country with transport powered by clean fuels, to end the carnage of respiratory deaths from particulate pollution. There is more than one way a vehicle can kill you.  

Vehicles, speed, air pollution and people just don’t mix. It’s possible, but not yet, that automated vehicles of the future will be able to stop on a penny for every hazard.

But that doesn’t and will never change our need to move our bodies, and consequently be healthy, happy people, particularly our children and their need to walk, run, hop and skip in safety and while breathing clean air.   

This week’s very high air pollution warning in London and the mayor’s announcement of “toxic air audits” at London schools drives home the importance of super-charging policy measures to enable low-carbon transport. 

Brake is fighting for a world that is safe, green, clean and fair, with zero road casualties and emissions from transport. This is a vision of sustainable mobility.

The United Nation’s 2020 deadline is rapidly approaching, for a halving of road deaths and injuries globally through safe systems and the 2030 goal of clean transport.  

This government has the power to stop the clock. To see what needs to be done. To be at the forefront of road safety solutions globally.

Over the past year, Brake has looked hard at our role providing education. We’ve particularly reflected on the difficulties of a campaigning, awareness raising charity achieving immediate behavioural change among individual drivers. Our surveys tell us time and again that many drivers understand risks, and do it anyway.

More than half of 25-34 year old drivers we questioned last year admitted sending or reading messages while driving.

Behavioural changes takes time. We haven’t got time.

The reality is that, while Brake can raise awareness, change needs to come from the top, and fast. 

To provide more funding for victim support.

To eliminate road casualties through safe systems.

To enable all vehicles to be clean vehicles.

But together we are so much stronger. I want to thank all supporters of the charity who help enable that change.

The families bereaved and injured, and their supportive communities, who raise awareness of the cause and fundraise.

The teachers who promote Road Safety Week in their schools, enabling children to pester power their parents to slow down.

The police and other road safety professionals, particularly family liaison officers, doing such an important task supporting affected families.

The companies prioritising managing their road risk, investing in low-carbon transport, or providing funds to the charity.

To our governments for part-funding Road Safety Week and our national victim helpline.

And last but not least to the Brake team of staff I am privileged to work with, many of whom are here tonight also.

When a life ends, time is suspended. We have clarity. Let’s use that clarity to keep fighting for humanity. 

 

 

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to register now for Road Safety Week – and get free resources

28 March 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are being urged to get involved in Road Safety Week 2014 (17-23 November), the UK's biggest road safety event, to help make streets and communities safer. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging educators, professionals and community leaders to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to get ideas on promoting safer road use and campaigning for safer roads in the Week, and register online for a free e-action pack.

Road Safety Week, now in its 18th year and supported by headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers, is a great opportunity for groups and individuals to team up and take action on road safety, and run activities to raise awareness and prevent needless casualties.

Everyone can access ideas plus free electronic resources and guidance to help them get involved at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk. Anyone who registers to be part of the Week is emailed a free e-action pack with downloadable posters and advice and case studies of what others have done in previous years.

The Road Safety Week 2014 theme is 'look out for each other': raising awareness of the ways everyone can help protect one another on roads, especially the most vulnerable. Brake will particularly call on drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike by slowing down to 20 in communities and looking twice and taking it slow at junctions and bends. Read more. Participants in the Week can run an initiative on this theme or any other road safety topic.

Last year 7,795 community groups, schools and organisations registered to take part, running activities ranging from fundraisers, road safety workshops, to protests against fast traffic, to community speed checks, to poster design competitions, many in partnership with local authorities, emergency services, or other agencies.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, says: "Road safety is a critical issue for communities everywhere, so we're calling on schools, groups and organisations around the country to play their part in making streets safer. Road Safety Week is a perfect opportunity to take action on local road safety issues, by campaigning, raising awareness and making a difference – especially in relation to protecting the most vulnerable road users, like children. Our theme this year is 'look out for each other', calling on everyone to be considerate on roads, but especially calling on drivers to slow down and take care to protect people on foot and bike. Everyone can help get this vital message out, and make a big difference to their local community. Log on to the Road Safety Week website for ideas and inspiration, and to register for a free e-action pack to help you take part."

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities
Runners and cyclists

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week
Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charity Brake, and now in its 18th year. In 2014 it will take place 17-23 November, with headline sponsorship from RSA and Specsavers. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraging grassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities. www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

About Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion

As a leading car insurer we have a natural interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK we have been a partner of Brake since 2011 and we also undertake road safety campaigns in many of our businesses across the world.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to register now for Road Safety Week – and get free resources

10 April 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are being urged to get involved in Road Safety Week 2015 (23-29 November), the UKs biggest road safety event, which involves thousands of schools each year. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging educators, professionals and community leaders to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to get ideas on teaching and promoting road safety during the Week, andregister for a free e-action pack.

Road Safety Week is now in its 19th year and coordinated with the support of headline sponsor Specsavers and the Department for Transport. Itsa great opportunity for groups and individuals to team up and take action on road safety, and run activities to raise awareness and prevent needless casualties.

Everyone can access free electronic resources and guidance to help them get involved.Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk for ideas and to register to get a free e-action pack (emailed out from September). This includes downloadable posters to display during the Week and advice and case studies of what other schools have done in previous years.

Announced this week, the Road Safety Week 2015 theme isdrive less, live more.Educators can link activities to this theme or any road safety topic.Brake will be encouraging families to consider how they use roads, and if they can ditch some vehicle mileage, and instead walk, cycle or use public transport as much as possible. Educators can engage pupils in exploring the benefits of sustainable and active travel and opportunities for their family to get around this way.They can: run a travel survey; map safe active travel routes in the area, promote active travel to students and parents through a display or web page; run lessons and assemblies that explore sustainable and active travel benefits.Read more.

Road crashes are the biggest cause of death among young people [1], and there is increasing acknowledgement of the threat traffic pollution and sedentary lifestyles pose to children and families. So raising awareness of road safety and creating safe spaces for sustainable and active travel is vital. Its an engaging topic, with plenty of scope for creative and interactive learning, while also meeting curriculum goals. Road Safety Week is also an opportunity for schools to promote wider action in the community to protect local children and families.Read more examples of how educators got involved in 2014.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, says:Road safety isn’t just about safe driving and using the green cross code. It’s about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing what we can to protect ourselves, people around us and the environment. A big part of that is driving less if we can, and this can make a huge difference to families’ health and wellbeing, communities and the planet. That’s why this Road Safety Week, we’re encouraging everyone to consider how they use roads, and if possible ditch some vehicle mileage, and walk, cycle or use public transport instead.

Everyone can help to get this vital message out. Thousands get involved in Road Safety Week every year - see www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk for ideas, and to register for a free action pack to help you take part.

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week
Road Safety Week is the UKs flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charityBrake, and now in its 19th year. In 2015 it will take place 23-29 November, with headline sponsorship from Specsavers and with support from the Department for Transport. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraginggrassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities.www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was£
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britains most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Readers Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high streetprovider of adult audiologyservices to the NHS
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country

End notes

[1] Death registrations in England and Wales: Table 2 Deaths by age, sex and underlying cause, 2012 registrations, Office National Statistics, 2013

Brake calls on schools, communities and organisations to run great events as part of Brake's Road Safety Week

25 July 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Schools, community groups, employers and professionals are urged to take part in Road Safety Week 2014 (17-23 November), the UK's biggest road safety event, which involves thousands of individuals and organisations each year. The charity Brake, which coordinates the event, is encouraging people to go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk to register for a free e-action pack, and to start planning great events and promote road safety during the Week.

Road Safety Week, supported by headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers, is a great opportunity for everyone to engage pupils, employees or their community in life-saving lessons. The theme of Road Safety Week 2014 is 'look out for each other': raising awareness of the ways everyone can help protect one another on roads, especially the most vulnerable. Brake will particularly call on drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike by slowing down to 20 in communities and looking twice and taking it slow at junctions and bends. We'll also call on everyone to be considerate to one another on roads. Read more. People can run their initiative on this theme or any other road safety topic.

REGISTER NOW! Register at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk  to get a free e-action pack. Plus, stay in touch by following @BrakeCharity and tweet about the Week using #roadsafetyweek

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chiefexecutive, says: "Road safety is a critical issue for schools, and educators can be pivotal in helping reduce the risks children and young people face – by teaching road safety, raising awareness locally and campaigning for safer streets. Our 2014 theme is 'look out for each other', so educators can join our calls for everyone to be considerate on roads, and help get the message to drivers about protecting kids on foot and bike.

"There are endless options for getting involved, whether it's teaching children about being bright and seen, educating teenagers about not taking risks as passengers, encouraging families to walk not drive, or campaigning for drivers to slow down. Log onto the Road Safety Week website for ideas and examples, and to register for a free e-action pack to help you take part."

Read our press releases calling on specific groups to get involved:

Schools, colleges and nurseries
Employers and fleets
Emergency services
Road safety professionals
Families and communities
Runners and cyclists

Notes for editors

About Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated annually by the charity Brake, and now in its 18th year. In 2014 it will take place 17-23 November, with headline sponsorship from RSA and Specsavers. Road Safety Week aims to raise awareness about the devastation of road crashes and casualties, and the part we can all play in making our roads and communities safer. It does this by encouraging grassroots involvement and promoting awareness-raising and educational messages. Each year it involves thousands of communities, schools, organisations and professionals across the UK running a wide range of road safety activities. www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group

With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion. As a leading car insurer we have a natural interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK we have been a partner of Brake since 2011 and we also undertake road safety campaigns in many of our businesses across the world.

About Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director.
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand.
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012.
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland.
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff.
  • Specsavers was voted Britain's most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012.
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011.
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK.
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street.
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS.
  • Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brake launches ‘Drive less, live more’ interactive resource to reduce car journeys and make streets safer in the run up to Road Safety Week

Wednesday 4th November
Contact e:
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive resource in the lead up to Road Safety Week 23–29 November 2015, with the theme'Drive less, live more'. Developed in partnership with AIG and Specsavers, the resource encourages everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by reducing car journeys and walking, cycling or using public transport instead.

Every day five people die on UK roads, and over 60 are seriously injured – resulting in needless devastation, trauma and suffering1. The vast majority of casualties are down to driver error. Road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are crucial. It’s about doing what we can to protect ourselves and the people around us to make our streets safer. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all.

Many people walk the few metres from their front door to the car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A shocking four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles2. Brake is asking everyone this Road Safety Week to consider how they use roads, and pledge to leave their car at home, at least for some journeys.

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only makes our streets safer by reducing traffic danger, but has personal benefits too. It can save money in car costs; help people live more active lives; reduce stress and illness; reinvigorate communities; and cut congestion and pollution.

The open-access‘Drive less, live more’ resource can be used to facilitate discussion about the importance of driving less. It can be used by anyone who works with drivers, including: fleet professionals and employers; driving instructors; road safety professionals and emergency services; teachers; community leaders; and by individuals directly wanting to see how they can help themselves and their community by driving less. Brake is especially encouraging families to use theDrive less, live more resource to reduce school-run and commuter traffic, and asking businesses to manage at-work journeys.

Access the resource online now atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessinteractive.

Gary Rae, Director of Communications and Campaigns, said: Our new ‘Drive less, live more’ e-learning resource shows people the benefits of walking, cycling or taking public transport, particularly for shorter journeys. The resource is a powerful tool that shows that by driving less, you can improve road safety and prevent casualties, become more active, and protect the planet. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, employers, driving instructors and educators to help them raise awareness of the benefits of active and sustainable transport.”

The facts

By 2035 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 45% and traffic delays by 64%3.

Four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles – short enough to replace with a pleasant walk or cycle ride. Currently, one in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of our children are driven to school4, even though the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles5.

One in four adults in England is obese and a further 37% are overweight6. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year7. Incorporating activity like walking and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight8, and can help guard against serious illnesses such as asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers9.

Commuting by public transport can also improve overall fitness. People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have been shown to have a lower BMI and a healthier bodyweight10.

Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs11. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling12.

Groups can register to take part atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors Specsavers and AIG.

The theme of Road Safety Week 2015, 23-29 November, is about making our roads and communities safer, happier places for everyone, by encouraging people to‘Drive less, live more’.

Brake has been running this successful event for 17 years, growing its reach and impact. We now share our experience globally atwww.roadsafetyweek.org, to help others run Road Safety Weeks and similar events in other countries.

Five people die every day on UK roads and around 60 are seriously injured. Brake’s priority is tackling these devastating tragedies, and making our streets safe for people to use without fear or threat. Reducing traffic is an important part of this.

Brake’s main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or the BrakeBlog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2010

[3] Road Transport Forecasts 2011, Department for Transport, 2011

[4] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[5] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[6] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, 2013 NHS, 2013

[7] Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, et al., ‘Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd Ed)’, Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[8] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[9] NHShttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx, 2015

[10] Flint Ellen, Cummins Steven, Sacker Amanda, ‘Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index:  population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom’, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[11] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[12] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Brake launches ‘look out for each other’ campaign as extent of selfish driving across North East is revealed

Monday 17 November 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • A fixed penalty for ‘careless driving’ or speeding is issued in the North East every 11 minutes
  • Half (49%) of primary school children in the North East say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike

Road safety charity Brake is today launching a campaign calling on all road users to look out for each other, to help stop the five deaths and 61 serious injuries that happen every day on UK roads [1][2], and particularly to protect people on foot and bike. The campaign is being backed by a bereaved family from the North East, where 76 people were killed and 726 seriously injured last year. See case study below.

The call comes at the start of Road Safety Week, coordinated by Brake, during which thousands of schools, communities and companies will be raising awareness, and police across the UK will be stepping up traffic enforcement to deter and catch drivers putting others at risk.

As part of the campaign, Brake and partners RSA and Specsavers are today (17 Nov) revealing statistics showing shocking numbers of drivers risking lives by flouting traffic laws. 46,359 fixed penalty notices were issued for ‘careless driving’ and speeding offences in the North East in 2013– one every 11 minutes. 45,823 were for speeding and 536 for careless driving (a fixed penalty newly introduced in August 2013). Embargoed figures are available by postcode, including the top 10 worst postcode areas[3].

This lack of patience, consideration and responsibility towards other road users can and does result in tragedy. It can also stop the most vulnerable from exercising their right to healthy, active, sustainable travel. Results of Brake’s survey of 400 primary school children in the North East[4], released today, show:

  • three in five (59%) think roads in their community can be dangerous for walking and cycling;
  • half (49%) say they have been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while on foot or bike.

That’s why Brake is calling on all road users to look out for each other, and particularly urging drivers to protect kids and adults on foot and bike – by slowing down to 20mph in communities, looking longer and taking it slow at junctions and bends, and giving people plenty of room and consideration. See below for more advice and facts showing why these steps are important.

Members of the public can show their support for thelook out for each other campaign by:

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of impatience or selfishness. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, daily, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. And there are wider consequences if we don’t look out for each other on roads – people afraid to walk and cycle or let their kids walk and cycle, and unable to get out and enjoy their community and live active lifestyles. That’s why, instead of making our streets stressful, risky places, we’re asking all road users to look out for and protect each other, particularly the most vulnerable – that means drivers sticking to 20 or below in towns and villages, looking carefully at junctions, and being considerate. Ultimately, we’re all just human beings trying to get around, with equal right to use the roads, not competing tribes.”

Chief Constable Suzette Davenport, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ national lead for roads policing, added:“Our officers and staff do a vital job in enforcing important safety laws and protecting the public on the roads. Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for forces and partners to engage with their local communities to deliver important road safety messages and undertake enforcement activities in support of Brake’s week.”

Road safety minister Robert Goodwill MP added his support, saying:“Cycling and walking are healthy ways to get around and are good for the environment too and I want more people to be able to make this choice for their journeys. At the same time we want to ensure cyclists and pedestrians are safe. That is why in the Cycling Delivery Plan I announced our proposals for the next phase of work on cycle and pedestrian safety. This includes cycle-proofing our roads and wider transport infrastructure, a review of regulations, the need to highlight best practice to local authorities, an update to the national design standards and a review of the driving test.”

Cllr Michael Mordey, portfolio holder for city services at Sunderland City Council, added:“While the number of road casualties year on year has remained similar, a key indicator of road safety is the number of serious casualties – and in Sunderland, we have seen some pleasing reductions recently. However, as we can see from Steven's tragic story, there is no room for complacency. We are working with our partners in the emergency and health services and other stakeholders and interest groups to learn what we can from the causes and trends in order to ensure we reduce casualties further. Safety is the responsibility of every road user, so we remind all drivers, riders, passengers, pedestrians and professional drivers to think about safety at all times.”

Peter Collins, group and UK head of corporate responsibility at RSA, commented:“A lack of patience or consideration for others on the roads can sometimes lead to dangerous, if not life threatening situations. Prevention is better than cure, so taking the time to look out for each other, being careful and considerate to all road users whether in vehicles, on bikes or on foot can help keep Britain's roads safe for everyone."

Specsavers founder Dame Mary Perkins says:“Specsavers stores have been proud to support Road Safety Week for a number of years. Good eyesight is essential to road safety, which is clearly recognised by this year's theme, ‘look out for each other’. But ‘looking out for each other’ isn’t just about keeping your eyesight up to scratch; it’s about keeping your mind sharp and being aware and considerate of everyone around you, especially vulnerable people on foot and bike who need that bit of extra protection. Specsavers stores will be doing their bit to raise awareness, and helping make sure people can be seen on the road.”

Case studies:

Find out about all the bereaved and injured volunteers supporting Road Safety Weekhere.

Steven Atkinson, 12, from Sunderland, was pushing his bike across Chester Road in 2009 when he was hit by a speeding driver. He was rushed to hospital, where he died from his injuries.Find out more.

 

Violet Atkinson, Steven’s mother, says:“After everything Steven went through, I am so proud of him. He never looked at his health as a problem and lived every day to the full. No words can describe the grief our family has gone through since his death. There’s a piece of us missing and there’s no way to escape that. My son is gone. I will never see him again, and it will never get easier. I don’t want another mother to experience the pain of seeing her child die. People need to wake up to the consequences of driving irresponsibly. This year’s Road Safety Week, I’m asking everyone to look out for each other on the road, and in particular for drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities, look twice and take it slow at junctions and bends, and give pedestrians and cyclists plenty of room.’’

Facts and advice:

‘Vulnerable road users’ (pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders)account for half (49%) of road deaths in the UK [5].

In the UK in 2013, 405 people were killed and 5,160 seriously injured walking, and 113 people were killed and 3,185 seriously injured cycling [6]. That's 24 people a day killed or seriously injured on foot or bike – one every hour.

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes, and especially in protecting vulnerable road users. If something unexpected happens – such as a child stepping out suddenly – it is a driver’s speed that determines if they can stop in time, and if they can’t, how hard they will hit. Every 1mph reduction in average speeds causes, on average, a 5% reduction in crash rates[7], anddrivers who speed are nearly twice as likely to have been involved in a crash[8]. Advice for drivers: stick to 20mph or below around homes, schools and shops. Your stopping distance in an emergency will be half what it is at 30mph, and in busy urban areas you won’t notice a difference in your journey time. You’ll save on fuel, vehicle wear and emissions.

Vulnerable road users are often at risk from vehicles manoeuvring, such as at junctions, where they may not be seen in a blind spot. 75% of cyclist collisions occur at or near junctions when vehicles are turning [9]. Advice for drivers: take it really slow at junctions and bends, look longer and carefully check mirrors before manoeuvring. Always assume a pedestrian or cyclist may be there; never just assume it’s safe to turn.

Traffic around homes, schools and shops, which could often be redirected to roads with fewer people walking or cycling, puts vulnerable road users at risk. Advice for drivers: consider your route and if you can minimise driving in communities. Consider if you need to make your journey by car at all: could you walk, cycle, or take public transport? Studies show active travel makes you happier as well as healthier [10].

Fear of traffic discourages people from walking or cycling, so it’s a big public health issue. Only 22% of journeys and 3% of miles travelled in Britain are on foot, and only 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are by bike [11]. A Brake survey of UK schoolchildren found three in four (76%) would like to walk and cycle more [12]. Another survey found one in three non-cyclists would cycle if routes were safer[13].

Up to 95% of crashes are caused by driver error[14]. Therefore it is vital drivers take responsibility to protect themselves and everyone around them. Everyone can commit to do this by making the Brake Pledge to follow six simple rules to help prevent devastating road crashes, atwww.brake.org.uk/pledge

Notes for editors:

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2014 takes place 17-23 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors RSA and Specsavers.

RSA

With a 300-year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK & Western Europe, Scandinavia, Canada and Latin America and can write business in around 140 countries in total. Focusing on general insurance such as motor, home, pet and commercial cover, RSA has more than 21,000 employees serving 17 million customers worldwide. In 2013 its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

Since 2011, RSA's 'Fit to Drive' campaign has worked to highlight the important issue of eye health and driver safety in the UK. http://www.rsagroup.com/

Specsavers

  • Specsavers was founded by Doug and Dame Mary Perkins in 1984 and is now the largest privately owned opticians in the world. The couple still run the company, along with their three children. Their son John is joint managing director
  • Specsavers has more than 1,600 stores throughout the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Spain, Australia and New Zealand
  • Total revenue for the Specsavers Group was £1.7 billion in 2011/2012
  • More than 20 million customers used Specsavers globally in 2011/2012. As of end March 2012, Specsavers had 16,138,076 customers in the UK and 928,582 customers in the Republic of Ireland
  • Specsavers optical stores and hearing centres are owned and run by joint venture or franchise partners. Together, they offer both optical and hearing services under one roof.
  • Specsavers employs more than 30,000 staff
  • Specsavers was voted Britain’s most trusted brand of opticians for the eleventh year running by the Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey 2012
  • More than one in three people who wear glasses in the UK buy them from Specsavers - 10,800,000 glasses were exported from the warehouse to stores in 2011
  • Specsavers was ranked No 1 for both eye tests and glasses in the UK
  • Specsavers sold more than 290 million contact lenses globally in 2011/12 and has more than a million customers on direct debit schemes. Specsavers' own contact lens brand - easyvision - is the most known on the high street
  • The hearcare business in the UK has established itself as the number one high street provider of adult audiology services to the NHS

Specsavers supports several UK charities including Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Sound Seekers, the road safety charity Brake, the anti-bullying charity Kidscape and Vision Aid Overseas, for whom stores have raised enough funds to build a school of optometry in Zambia and open eyecare outreach clinics in much of the country.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[2] Police recorded injury road traffic collision statistics: 2013 key statistics report, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2014
[3] Analysis by Brake of data provided by the DVLA, September 2014 https://www.dropbox.com/sh/et6pjj56i2w2guo/AABDJE4mN_5nlr7i5eGoixVja?dl=0. These figures are combined totals of the following careless driving offences: CD10: Driving without due care and attention; CD20: Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users; CD30: Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users, and the following speeding offences: SP10: Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits; SP20: Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles); SP30: Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road; SP40: Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit; SP50: Exceeding speed limit on a motorway; SP60: Undefined speed limit offence.
[4] 'Hands up' survey of 417 primary school children (aged 7-11) from schools in the North East participating in Brake's Giant Walking Bus, carried out between January and May 2014. When asked 'do you think roads in your neighbourhood can be dangerous for kids who are walking or cycling?', 59% said yes, 41% said no. When asked 'have you ever been hit or nearly hit by a vehicle while walking or cycling?', 49% said yes, 51% said no.
[5] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[6] ibid
[7] Speed, speed limits and accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994
[8] The speeding driver: who, how and why? Scottish Executive, 2003
[9] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[10] Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia, 2014 http://www.uea.ac.uk/mac/comm/media/press/2014/september/active-commuting-benefits 
[11] National travel survey 2012, Department for Transport, 2013
[12] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake, 2014 http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1230-gwb2014 
[13] Speed in built-up areas, Brake and Direct Line, 2013 http://www.brake.org.uk/assets/docs/dl_reports/DLreport-Speed-section2-urbanroads-2013.pdf 
[14] Dimensions of aberrant driver behaviour, Uppsala University, Sweden, 1998

Brake launches website to support life-saving Road Safety Weeks around the world

Tuesday 29 July

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has today launched a Road Safety Week global hub - www.roadsafetyweek.org - to give easy access to road safety guidance, tools, resources and case studies for organisations around the world. Sponsored by RSA Insurance Group, it aims to help NGOs, government agencies, companies, schools, communities and local agencies organise successful awareness-raising road safety events and campaigns at national and grassroots level.

The charity hopes the site will help to increase the number and impact of regular Road Safety Weeks around the world - the value of which has been recognised in the UN's action plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety. The site shares Brake's experience as long-running organisers of national Road Safety Weeks in the UK and New Zealand, and showcases good practice case studies of other awareness-raising road safety events from around the world.

Resources that can be accessed through www.roadsafetyweek.org include:

Visit www.roadsafetyweek.org to see the full site, which will continue to be added to and expanded.

Brake is also running a series of free webinars alongside launching this site on coordinating Road Safety Week events, where attendees can hear from experienced organisers and get ideas and support:

  • 17 Sept 2pm BST (GMT + 1:00): webinar for NGOs, government agencies, communities and educators - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage communities on road safety;
  • 17 Sept 3pm NZST (GMT + 12:00): webinar for companies - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage employees and communities on road safety;
  • 18 Sept 2pm BST (GMT + 1:00): webinar for companies - Running a Road safety Week: an annual event to engage employees and communities on road safety; and
  • 18 Sept 3pm NZST (GMT + 12:00): webinar for NGOs, government agencies, communities and educators - Running a Road Safety Week: an annual event to engage communities on road safety.

For more information go to www.roadsafetyweek.org/webinars, and register online using our booking form.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive at Brake, said: "With more than 1.2 million people killed globally in road crashes each year, and tens of millions injured, it is vital that governments, NGOs, employers, community leaders and road safety practitioners work together to end this devastating epidemic. Organising a Road Safety Week at national, local or organisational level can be an effective way to get crucial road safety messages out widely to the public and help save lives. As long-running organisers of national Road Safety Weeks in the UK and New Zealand, we are keen to share our experience with others globally, promote good practice in road safety awareness-raising, and pool tools and resources. Our roadsafetyweek.org site provides potential Road Safety Week organisers with the information and resources they need to persuade people of the vital importance of using roads safely to protect yourself and others."

Peter Collins, head of corporate responsibility for RSA, said: "We share Brake's ambition to raise road safety awareness, promote safe sustainable road use and prevent devastating casualties. This new online hub is full of practical advice, tools and case studies and we're encouraging anyone looking to organise a road safety event to take advantage of its resources."

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About RSA Group
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world's leading multinational quoted insurance groups. RSA has major operations in the UK, Scandinavia, Canada, Ireland, Asia and the Middle East, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe and has the capability to write business in around 140 countries. Focusing on general insurance, RSA has around 23,000 employees and, in 2013, its net written premiums were £8.7 billion.

As a leading car insurer they have an interest in promoting safety awareness and reducing the number of crashes on our roads. In the UK, they have been a partner of Brake since 2011. They undertake road safety campaigns in many of their businesses across the world.

Calendar of Brake events

Brake Professional events: Brake offers a full calendar of professional development opportunities for fleet and road safety professionals, including conferences, seminars and webinars, master-classes and on-site training.
View the calendar of Brake Professional events.

Road Safety Week: Brake organises two domestic Road Safety Weeks, in the UK and New Zealand, and professionals and campaigners are at the heart of them. Road Safety Week is a partnership event; Brake coordinates the week, but it is up to everyone to run initiatives in the week that spread road safety messages. Many participants also choose to raise funds for Brake and our work campaigning for road safety and supporting road crash victims.
Find out more about UK Road Safety Week (23 - 29 November 2015)

Brake's Giant Walk: Every year, Brake co-ordinates a Brake's Giant Walk for primary schools. This event raises awareness of the dangers of traffic and how cool it is to walk, and raises funds for Brake's work to improve road safety and care for road crash victims.
Find out more about Brake's Giant Walk  (10 June 2015)

Beep Beep! Day: Every year thousands of tots and infants age 2-7 take part in a special Beep Beep! Day organised by their nursery, playgroup, childminder or infant school, to help save little lives. Brake provides free email action packs or bumper resource packs for £12.60 (including VAT) to help you run a fun day and promote road safety, including posters, stickers and other resources.
Find out more about Beep Beep! Day  (18 March, 10 July, 25 November 2015)

 

Cyclists urged to go bright for safer roads in Road Safety Week

Brake, the road safety charity

8 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

 

Cyclists are being encouraged to help raise awareness about the importance of protecting people on bikes and foot by hosting a Bright Day during Road Safety Week (19-25 November), the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated by the charity Brake. It's a brilliant opportunity for cycling-enthusiasts to don their favourite high-vis gear, promote life-saving awareness and raise funds for a worthwhile cause.

Brake's theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Brake will be emphasising the importance of making it safer for people to walk and cycle in their communities, for their health and enjoyment and as a sustainable transport choice. Brake will be calling for action from authorities to make walking and cycling safer, and appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for people on foot and bikes. Read more.

Road Safety Week is about thousands of communities, schools and organisations taking action on road safety, and there are lots of simple ways to get involved. Anyone can register now to get a free e-action pack with resources, guidance and ideas at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Brake is particularly calling on cyclists to run a Bright Day in their workplace or community, where everyone wears bright clothes and makes a donation to Brake. The event helps raise awareness about the importance of drivers looking out for pedestrians and cyclists. It's the perfect excuse for cyclists to wear their neon and reflective gear with pride, and funds raised help Brake's work campaigning for safer roads and caring for families bereaved and injured in road crashes.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: ""Road Safety Week is a great opportunity to work together to make our streets safer, greener, more pleasant places. We believe people should be able to walk and cycle without their lives being endangered by traffic. We'll be calling on authorities to do more to protect people on foot and bike, and calling on drivers to make a difference by slowing down. We're encouraging cyclists everywhere to join this vital campaign, by registering now on the Road Safety Week website to get ideas and free resources."

"Organising a Bright Day is a great way to get involved in the UK's biggest road safety event, have fun, raise awareness, and raise funds. It's a simple way to promote a critical message, encouraging drivers to look out for and be considerate towards pedestrians and cyclists, including slowing down so they have more chance to react."

Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk and click on the communities section for more.

About Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

Digby Brown and Brake

Digby Brown logo 12

Digby Brown has been a valued supporter of Brake for nine years, providing crucial funding and support for our services supporting people affected by road
crashes. Brake operates a helpline for anyone needing practical or emotional advice following a bereavement or serious injury on the roads, and we are able to support a growing number of people each year through the helpline.

Through our partnership, we have also been able to extend our support throughout Scotland, coordinating training for family liaison officers on how to support families bereaved on the roads.  

Digby Brown has also provided long term support to Brake’s flagship annual event, Road Safety Week, helping us to launch our national media campaign in Scotland. We have worked together to coordinate events in Scotland, aimed at engaging with local communities and national media.

Digby Brown has also supported Brake by providing a spokesperson for Brake’s activities in Scotland, Fraser Simpson, which has helped us to further extend our campaigns and activities in Scotland.

 

Driving instructors urged to buddy up with Brake for Road Safety Week

Brake, the road safety charity

14 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

 

Driving instructors are being encouraged to help spread life-saving road safety awareness during Road Safety Week (19-25 November), the UK's flagship road safety event, by signing up to Brake's Buddy ADI scheme. It's a chance for instructors to promote simple steps drivers can take to protect themselves and others, using resources from Brake and as part of a UK-wide initiative.

Brake's theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Brake will be highlighting the importance of everyone being able to walk and cycle safely for their health and enjoyment, and the difference drivers can make by slowing down. Brake will be appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph or below in communities to help protect people on foot and bike. Read more.

Road Safety Week is about thousands of communities, schools and organisations taking action on road safety, and there are lots of simple ways to get involved. Anyone can register now to get a free e-action pack with resources, guidance and ideas at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Brake is particularly calling on instructors to sign up to its Buddy DI Scheme in advance of the Week.The project helps driving instructors provide road safety information to young drivers, discuss the risks they face and how to reduce these, and promote Brake's acclaimed 2young2die campaign. ADIs who sign up to the scheme receive a free pack of resources to pass to their pupils, including on important topics such as speed and drink driving. Buddies also receive a free subscription to Brake's Road Safety Forum for one year.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: "Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for those already delivering road safety advice at a local level, and professionals wanting to do more to promote road safety, to link up with a national campaign. Becoming a Buddy ADI with Brake is a great way to get involved. The scheme is designed to help driving instructors spread life-saving messages, including encouraging young drivers to be more considerate towards pedestrians and cyclists, and emphasising the benefits of slowing down. We really value the involvement of driving instructors in Road Safety Week and urge them to join this vital campaign, by registering now on the Road Safety Week website."

Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk and click on communities for other ways to get involved and to register for the Week. Or sign up to the Buddy ADI scheme by emailing your details to admin@brake.org.uk with Buddy ADI in the subject bar

About Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

 

Emergency services urged to take action on speed in Road Safety Week

 

Brake, the road safety charity
 
15 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk 
 
 
Emergency services are being encouraged to help raise awareness about the life-saving importance of slowing down by running 2young2die workshops and other activities during Road Safety Week (19-25 November), the UK’s flagship road safety event coordinated by the charity Brake. It’s a chance for emergency service workers to share their first-hand experiences of the consequences of dangerous driving, and make use free resources from Brake and as part of a UK-wide initiative. 
 
Brake’s theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is ‘Slower speeds = happy people’. Brake will be promoting the importance of making it safer for everyone to walk and cycle, without fear from fast traffic, for health and enjoyment. Brake will be appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities to protect people on foot and bike. Emergency services can tie their activities to this theme, or focus on other road safety issues.
 
Each year thousands of communities, schools and organisations get involved in Road Safety Week by taking action on road safety and running local educational and awareness activities – and emergency services are often at the heart of this. Register now to get a free e-action pack with resources, guidance and ideas on getting involved at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.
 
Brake is particularly calling on emergency services to coordinate 2young2die workshops for young people, highlighting the dangers of speeding and other deadly behaviour like drink and drug driving. Brake runs low-cost courses and provides resource packs to facilitate delivery of these workshops. See forthcoming training dates. Emergency services can also support young people to develop their own slow down campaigns, which can be entered into Brake’s national 2young2die awards, sponsored by ikube ®. 
 
Brake is also encouraging police forces to run enforcement and awareness activities, such as community speed watch involving local schools and groups, to help get the slow down message out during the Week.
 
Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: “Road Safety Week is a great opportunity to work together to make our streets and communities safer, more pleasant places. In previous years emergency services have played a critical role, coordinating high impact activities to promote vital messages, and using your experience dealing with the aftermath of crashes to get the message across powerfully. This year Brake is focusing on the importance of making roads safer for people to walk and cycle – and the difference drivers can make by slowing down. We’re encouraging emergency services to help get this message across, through local community engagement, enforcement and publicity activities, and through working with young people as part of our 2young2die programme. Register now on the Road Safety Week website for free resources and ideas.”
 
Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk then road safety professionals then emergency services for more ideas and to register for a free email action pack. 
 
About Brake
 
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week(19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake’s support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.
 
Ikube 
iKube is an insurance product offered through Motaquote in conjunction with a number of insurance providers.
Established in 1991, Motaquote specialises in a wide range of personal and commercial lines insurance. Headquartered in Williamstown, South Wales it is part of nationwide group, Cullum Capital Ventures (CCV).Cullum Capital Ventures (CCV), part of the Towergate Group, is one of the UK’s largest independently owned insurance intermediaries with more than 800 staff. Headquartered in Maidstone, it offers a wide range of general insurance products nationwide.   For regional brokers looking to sell their business, CCV can provide flexible full or partial ownership solutions. Businesses can continue to trade under their own brand, while CCV is committed to providing full support across all management functions.
 

 

Fleet drivers

National Accident Helpline is pleased to sponsor this page.

FleFleet driveret drivers are at the coal face of road safety. Whether you drive a 38 tonne truck or a delivery moped, you can make a difference on our roads. About one in three road deaths involves a vehicle being driven for work purposes and many more involve people driving to and from work.

Help stop the carnage by ensuring your driving is as safe as it possibly can be, and being an ambassador for safe driving. Start by signing our Pledge and reading the accompanying driver advice and encourage colleagues to do the same.

Help your employer prioritise fleet safety by encouraging them to join Brake Professional, our low-cost service giving road risk management advice on critical topics from driver tiredness to vehicle maintenance. Signing up often helps employers save money as well as protecting their staff and the public from potentially deadly crashes.

You can also encourage your employer or union to take part in Road Safety Week, an ideal time to raise awareness among staff about road safety and raise funds for Brake. 

Finally, help Brake's work to make roads safer and support bereaved and injured crash victims by fundraising for us, making a donation, and backing our campaigns. Thanks for your support!

This page is kindly sponsored by:

logo 13 nah

 

GO 20 campaign calls for a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling

Fleets urged to raise awareness among at-work drivers during Road Safety Week

19 November 2012

Brake, the road safety charity
19 november 2012 

A national campaign launched today (19 November) is appealing to drivers to GO 20, to bring about a 2012 legacy of safe walking and cycling for everyone. Brake, the road safety charity is appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops, and calling for 20mph limits in built-up areas, so children and adults can walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment, and for cheap and sustainable travel, without being endangered.

Fleet operators and suppliers nationwide are helping to promote the life saving slow down message by getting involved in Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), coordinated by Brake, and mobilising staff and communities in awareness-raising activities.

Thousands of organisations, schools and community groups around the UK are taking part in the Week to get the message across about how we can make roads safer and prevent needless tragedies.

Brake is encouraging companies, particularly fleet operators, to take advantage of the event to promote safe driving to staff and show their commitment to road safety in the wider community. Companies can still register on the Road Safety Week website to receive a pack of free electronic resources, including a guidance sheet by Brake's Fleet Safety Forum on managing driver speed.

As the GO 20 campaign is launched in Road Safety Week through street parties and events across the UK (see below), a survey of more than 8,000 children [1] age 7-11 by Brake, Brain Injury Group and Specsavers reveals how children are affected by danger from fast traffic:

  • Seven in 10 (70%) say they would be able to walk and cycle more if roads in their neighbourhood were less dangerous
  • More than three-quarters (77%) say drivers need to slow down around their home and school
  • Four in 10 (43%) say they have been hit or nearly hit while walking or cycling, and more than half (54%) worry about being hurt by traffic when out and about.

The GO 20 campaign is highlighting that slower speeds in towns, cities and villages can help deliver a post-2012 legacy of active communities, and prevent devastating pedestrian and cyclist casualties, which increased in 2011 (see below). Many authorities are already recognising the benefits of 20mph by implementing town and city-wide 20 limits. GO 20 calls for: more authorities to do this; the government to work towards 20mph being the norm in communities; and drivers to pledge to GO 20 around homes, schools and shops, even where 30 limits remain.

Why GO 20:

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have much more time to react, to help them stop in time if they need to, like if a child runs out. Studies show that when 20 limits replace 30, it means fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [2].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [3].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution: GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [4]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [5]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [6]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [7]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

Read more about the case for GO 20 here.

Companies getting involved in Road Safety Week:

Below are some examples of how fleets and fleet suppliers are getting involved in Road Safety Week.

Balfour Beatty Fleet Services are visiting three high schools in the Derby area, West Park School, Derby College and Friesland School to deliver interactive presentations which will encourage Year 11 and 12 students to drive safely.

Cardinus Risk Management are holding a cine racing event with a buffet, disco, charity auction and raffle, with all proceeds being donated to Brake to support their work preventing road crashes and supporting the victims.

Colas Limited are engaging their staff on the importance of slowing down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops by running a Bright Day on 23rd November 2012 at their head office in Crawley and across the UK, where everyone will wear fluorescent clothing to work. This is particularly important message during the winter months as darker nights and worsening weather conditions reduce visibility and make it harder to see children and pedestrians.

Eddie Stobart employees will be working with pupils at West Haddon Primary School in Northamptonshire to deliver road safety messages to children around the importance of Be Bright Be Seen and the Green Cross Code.

Many of the organisations taking part are Brake partners and subscribers to Brake's Fleet Safety Forum, which provides advice, information and resources based around a programme of events for fleet professionals, sharing and promoting best practice and latest research. 2013 topics include Using in-vehicle technology to improve safety, Creating sustainable travel plans, and Blind spots & manoeuvring: preventing crashes with pedestrians and cyclists. Fleet operators can find out how they can benefit from this essential service at www.fleetsafetyforum.org.

A free copy of the Forum's guidance report for fleet managers on Managing driver speed is included in the e-action pack available by registering at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive of Brake, says: "GO 20 is all about enabling people to walk and cycle without fear or threat. If we are to bring about a 2012 legacy of more active communities, we need to make our streets and communities safer places. Fleet operators can play an essential role in bringing this about, by ensuring their drivers always put protecting people first, and understand the vital importance of slowing down. Our main message in Road Safety Week is appealing to drivers to stay well within limits, and slow down to 20 around homes, schools and shops. It makes roads safer for walking and cycling, and makes little difference to journey times. It's great so many fleet operators are getting involved and helping to communicate this and other life-saving messages this year. We urge other employers to register on the Road Safety Week website to get our free guidance on managing driver speed."

Anyone can pledge their support for GO 20 at go20.org.

Campaign launch events

GO 20 is being launched at a walking and cycling street party in Islington, London's first 20mph borough:
AT: 10.30am, Monday 19 November 2012
WHERE: Sable Street, Islington N1 2AF (at the back of William Tyndale Primary School)
FILMING/PHOTOS: children from William Tyndale Primary School will be hearing from Paralympian Danny Crates how great it is to be healthy and active, taking part in a safe cycling demo with Islington Council, carrying out speed checks with Met Police, and celebrating 20mph with their own banners and placards
INTERVIEWS: Brake deputy CEO Julie Townsend; Paralympian Danny Crates; bereaved parents Sue and Dave Britt; injured campaigner Tom Kearney; Chief Inspector Ian Vincent, Metropolitan Police; Cllr James Murray, Islington Council's executive member for housing and development; vox pops with kids

Other events are happening across the UK, in partnership with local authorities, emergency services and schools. Find out more from news@brake.org.uk / 01484 559909.

Pedestrian and cyclist casualties

Every day in the UK, 19 adults and seven children are mowed down and killed or seriously hurt when on foot or bike.

In 2011 pedestrian deaths and serious injuries went up significantly, and for the first time in 17 years. Pedestrian deaths increased by 12%, while serious injuries increased by 5%. 466 people were killed on foot in 2011 and 5,654 were seriously injured. Of these victims, 31% (1,901) were children: 50 child pedestrians were killed in 2011 and 1,851 suffered serious injuries.

While cyclist deaths decreased by 2% in 2011, serious injuries increased by 16%. 109 cyclists were killed in 2011 and 3,132 suffered serious injuries. Of these victims, 16% (511) were children: 10 child cyclists were killed and 501 suffered serious injuries. [8]

More survey results

8,061 children age 7-11 gave their views through hands-up surveys in schools across the UK. As well as the results above:

  • 72% said they would like to walk and cycle more than they do at present
  • 75% would like more traffic-free cycle paths in their area, while 61% would like more footpaths, pavements and crossings, which they could use to get to school, the park, shops or to see friends
  • 38% said they are not allowed to walk unaccompanied and 47% said they are not allowed to cycle unaccompanied.

Compare results from different UK regions on this restricted-access web page.

Case studies

Aaron Britt, 16, from Mansfield, was knocked down and killed by a speeding driver outside his college on 3 October 2011. Aaron suffered severe head injuries and died the following day. His mum Sue Britt is supporting Road Safety Week and the GO 20 campaign. Read more.

Sue Britt says: "Aaron was our only son and we feel empty without him. He was an exceptional young lad; he knew exactly what he wanted to do with his life and had set about making it happen. I urge drivers to slow down to 20mph or less where people are so you have time to stop if someone steps out. Simply making a commitment to slow down will mean you're helping to make roads safer, and it could prevent more people losing their lives needlessly, and other families going through the pain and heartache we have. Aaron was kind and thoughtful and did not deserve to die for making a mistake."

Tom Kearney, 47, of Hampstead, was struck by a bus as he was about to cross Oxford Street at a pedestrian crossing on the busiest shopping day of the year. He suffered severe injuries to his brain and lungs, and was in a deep near-death coma for two weeks. It took Tom two years to recover. Read more.

Tom said: "It took me about two years to rebuild my life because of being hit by a bus. I'm lucky to still be here at all; other people are not so lucky. Drivers can make a big difference in helping to prevent injuries, deaths and suffering by being more aware about the harm they can cause, and taking responsibility for the speed of their vehicles. Drivers should slow right down on shopping streets, in residential neighbourhoods and around schools. Vehicles have the right to be on roads, but so do pedestrians and other non-vehicle road users. If you are behind the wheel of a vehicle, you also have the responsibility to drive with lives outside your vehicle in mind."

Sponsor quotes

Dame Mary Perkins, founder of Specsavers, says: "We are proud to be backing Road Safety Week and joining Brake in calling for action to protect people on foot and bicycle and make our roads safer for everyone. At Specsavers we think protecting children, families and people of all ages when they walk and cycle is absolutely vital. Allowing more people to walk or cycle safely is good for health, the economy and the environment. Everyone can play a part in making this happen, but drivers in particular can take some simple steps, like committing to slowing down to 20mph where people live, and making sure they have crystal clear 20-20 vision too. If we all get behind this campaign, we can make a huge difference in preventing casualties and making our communities safer places."

Sally Dunscombe, operations director at Brain Injury Group says: "We are delighted to support Road Safety Week and to play our part in making roads safer for people to walk and cycle. We know from our work that motor vehicle crashes account for half of all traumatic brain injuries, causing terrible suffering and turns people's lives upside down. Slowing down to 20mph makes an enormous difference in preventing road casualties as it gives you a better chance of stopping in time in an emergency, such as if a child runs out. As well as preventing devastating casualties, if drivers slow down to 20mph it makes our communities more enjoyable places, where people – particularly children – can get out and about without being endangered. We all have a role to play in making this happen, and Brain Injury Group is committed to playing its part by getting behind this important campaign."

Notes for editors

GO 20 is a partnership campaign being launched by Brake at the start of Road Safety Week 2012 (19-25 November). Find out more at www.go20.org.

Brakeis an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support divisioncares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road Safety Week is the UK's flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2012 takes place 19-25 November, with support from headline sponsors Brain Injury Group and Specsavers, plus regional sponsors Woop young driver insurance, Bubblebum UK Ltd, Fleet Support Group and Leigh Day & Co Solicitors.

The Brain Injury Group is the UK's first national network of dedicated brain and head injury lawyers and expert specialists that provides a complete package of support for brain injured people and their families. If you have been affected by brain injury, you can find a local, specialist, skilled brain injury lawyer and other associated support services to help you at www.braininjurygroup.co.uk 

Good eyesight is imperative to road safety, which is why Specsavers has made a longstanding commitment to promoting the importance of clear vision behind the wheel, working alongside the national road safety charity Brake. The Specsavers Drive Safe road show tours events and town centres across the country with its specially designed trailer. Visitors to the trailer are invited to receive free vision and hearing screening, with experts on hand to answer any questions.

Islington Councilis the first local authority in the country to introduce 20mph limits across its roads: main roads as well as side roads. All Islington's side streets became 20mph in 2010, and a year later the council agreed to introduce the same limit on main roads, to improve safety in the inner London borough. Work to install new signs and road markings is due to start later this year, to be completed by spring 2013. A small number of major roads in Islington, managed by Transport for London, will remain at 30mph.


Road crashes are not accidents; the use of the term 'accident' undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by drivers taking risks on roads.

End notes:

[1] 8,061 children gave their views through 'hands-up' surveys in schools across the UK, Brake, 2012

[2] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[3] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[4] Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999

[5] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[6] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[7] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation's Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012. Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers' speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy. Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[8] These figures are from Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2011, and Police recorded injury road traffic collisions and casualties Northern Ireland annual report 2011, Police Service of Northern Ireland, 2012. Figures for children were requested from the Department for Transport and Police Service for Northern Ireland and are for children aged 0 – 17.

Iain Wright, MP for Hartlepool, November 2006

Iain supported Brake’s Road Safety Week in November by calling for a graduated licensing scheme to be implemented. Graduated driver licensing means dividing the learning period into several stages and phasing in driving privileges gradually to enable new drivers to gain experience and skills before they gain a full driving licence. Iain tabled an Early Day Motion (EDM 2899) in favour of graduated licensing and encouraged fellow MPs to sign. He also called for a debate on the issue as well as working with the media to raise awareness on the topic, including being interviewed by ITV Tyne Tees news. Iain explains exactly what a graduated licensing system could entail, and why he thinks it is necessary:

“I think this country should consider introducing a graduated driver licensing scheme that would restrict the size of engine, the number of passengers that could be carried and the types of road that can be driven along, for young and new drivers. One in eight people holding driving licences is aged 25 or under, yet more than a quarter of drivers killed are from this age group. The statistics speak for themselves. The point is to ensure that young people and novice drivers are safe, and that when driving they are not a risk to themselves, passengers or pedestrians.”

Click here to visit Iain’s website and read more about his views on this issue and click here for information on Brake’s ‘Licensed to kill?’ campaign, which is calling for the introduction of graduated licensing.

Other road safety work by Iain included attending and speaking at a meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Road Safety, of which he is chair, and tabling a written question concerning the discontinuation of funding for the BrakeCare bereavement pack for families bereaved through a road crash.

Infant and primary schools

If you would like to receive information about other opportunities and events please sign up at our preference centre.

School sign

Using roads is part of children's daily lives so they often have a lot to say about it if encouraged. Traffic is one of the biggest causes of death and serious injury among kids, and danger from traffic has a big impact on families' ability to live healthy, active life-styles. Road safety is therefore a brilliant topic for infant and primary schools, to help you meet a range of curriculum goals, have a positive impact on the local community, and save lives.

There are many stimulating ways to address the subject; one of the best ways is giving children ownership of it by getting them campaigning for road safety through creative projects. Children can be powerful advocates for road safety, helping parents and the wider community to be safer, and calling on drivers to protect children, as well as learning about road safety themselves. Children can also help fundraise for Brake and our services for people bereaved and injured on roads.

Follow the links below to get teaching and campaigning!

Brake's Giant Walk for schools
Our giant annual event for primary schools: kids march from the school gates, saying yes to walking and no to people driving fast in your community.

Road Safety Week
The UK's biggest road safety event, coordinated by Brake each November, is an ideal time to teach road safety, campaign for safer streets and fundraise for Brake. Register for an email action pack to help you.

Beep Beep! Day
A fun road safety day for 2-7 year-olds, to teach young children the road safety basics and raise awareness among parents.

Teaching resources
Our online guide to teaching road safety year-round, including lesson ideas, assembly plans, colour-in posters and advice on safe school trips.

Bright Days
Bright Days are a great fundraiser that you can run in Brake focussing on being bright, being smart and following the Brake pledge. This event can involve teaching goals focussing on any of the six aspects of the Brake pledge.

Community campaign kit
Advice on campaigning for safer streets in your local area. 

Seminars on supporting bereaved children
Acclaimed annual seminars on working with and supporting children and young people who are suddenly bereaved, run by Brake's Sudden initiative