Articles Tagged ‘traffic - Brake the road safety charity’

As children head back to school we reveal the extent of dangerous speeding in 20mph areas

  • Four in 10 (40%) of drivers admit to ‘sometimes’ breaking the speed limit by at least 10mph
  • More than a quarter of drivers ‘regularly’ speed in areas designed to keep children (and other vulnerable road users) safe

A new survey by Brake and Direct Line has revealed how many drivers are speeding on roads where lower limits are in place to keep children and other road users safe.

Four in 10 (40%) of drivers admit they sometimes travel at 30mph or more where there is a limit of 20mph. More than a quarter (26%) of drivers say they do this at least once a month and just over one in five (21%) admits to driving much faster than the 20mph speed limit on a weekly basis. Most 20mph zones and areas are in the vicinity of schools and homes where many children will be regularly walking and cycling.

In 2014, 53 children under 16 were killed and 2,029 were seriously injured on British roads: that’s almost six children seriously hurt or killed every day. The majority (80%) were on foot or bicycle at the time.[i] 

Speed limits are put in place to keep all road users safe, especially vulnerable ones like children, and can make the difference between life and death. If a child runs into the road three car lengths ahead, a driver travelling at 30mph will not be able to stop in time, and will still be travelling at 28mph when they hit the child. A driver travelling at 20mph should just be able to stop in time, providing they are paying attention, have well-maintained brakes, and are driving in dry conditions.

There is plenty of evidence to show that lowering traffic speeds, and lowering limits to 20mph specifically, reduces casualties and creates a safer road environment, especially for those on foot and bicycle, but of course this only works if limits are adhered to. 

Analysis of 75 20mph limit sites in Scotland found casualties dropped by 42%.[ii] The World Health Organisation recommends 20mph limits as a key measure to improve pedestrian safety and save lives.[iv]

Case study

Tommy Kenny was just 10 years old when he was tragically knocked down and killed on a pedestrian crossing on a 30mph road in London. He was thrown approximately 60ft on impact, leaving him with multiple traumatic injuries so severe that he stood no chance of survival. The police investigator said that the driver was doing between 30-39mph when he hit Tommy. If the limit had been set to 20mph rather than 30mph, Tommy might still be here today.

Tommy's aunt, Michelle Kirby, said: “Tommy was a much loved son, brother, grandson, nephew and cousin with the best years of his life ahead of him. Our lives fell apart when he died and he is missed hugely by his whole family. He was a very bright, fun-loving and cheeky boy with a unique personality and a vivid imagination. He loved dinosaurs, Steven Gerrard and Doctor Who. 
If we are honest with ourselves, most people have to admit to creeping over the speed limit at times. Yet we've all seen the harrowing adverts on TV showing the horrific results of what speed can do to a child. If you drive at 20mph, you have a good chance of being able to stop in time if you need to, such as if a child runs out in front of you. We all need to slow down, and we can all do that today. One can only imagine what pain Tommy's parents, Lynsey and Lloyd, have gone through and will do for the rest of their lives.”

Alice Bailey, campaigns advisor for Brake, the road safety charity, said: “All parents want to know their children are safe while travelling to and from school and playing outdoors. Speed limits are in place to keep all road users safe and if tragedy strikes and a child is hit by a car, the speed at which it is travelling could be the difference between life and death. 20mph limits benefit our communities in so many ways, keeping them safer, cleaner and greener; when limits are lower, many more people choose to ditch the car completely and walk and cycle instead[CF1] . If people feel they have to drive, the lower speed limit will have a negligible impact on travel times and bring so many other positive effects.”

Rob Miles, director of car insurance at Direct Line, said: "Adhering to the speed limit is such a simple way of helping to make our roads safer and is within all drivers’ gift. We urge drivers to be conscientious and to remember that speed limits exist for very good reasons and that it is a legal requirement to observe them.”

Q.1 Within the past year, have you driven at 30mph or faster in a 20mph speed limit?

No, never                                            60

Yes, less than once a month              14

Yes, about once a month                      5       

Yes, about once a week                       8

Yes, several times a week                    9

Yes, once a day or more                      4

Q.2 Within the past year, have you driven at 40mph or faster in a 30mph speed limit?

No, never                                            60

Yes, less than once a month              16

Yes, about once a month                      4

Yes, about once a week                       8

Yes, several times a week                    9

Yes, once a day or more                      3

 

Notes to Editors:

Tommy’s mum Lynsey is available for interview

Please contact Alice at Brake on 01484 550063 or on abailey@brake.org.uk

Or email the news inbox on news@brake.org.uk

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Direct Line

Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or on-line.

Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by U K Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England and Wales No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc.

Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0345 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com


[i] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015, table RAS30062

[ii] 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001

[iv] Pedestrian safety: a road safety manual for decision-makers and practitioners, World Health Organisation, 2013

Brake calls for reintroduction of casualty reduction targets, as road deaths and serious injuries rise

Thursday 24 September 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the government to show strong leadership and reintroduce casualty reduction targets as the Department for Transport publishes its Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain Annual Report for 2014. It shows that 1,775 people died on the roads (a 4% increase on the year before). 22,807 more were seriously injured (a 5% annual increase).

Casualties of all severities rose to 194,477 in Great Britain in 2014, an increase of 6% from 2013, interrupting what was a steady downward trend since 1997.

Brake believes the reintroduction of ambitious casualty reduction targets, axed in 2010, must be a key first step in an urgently needed fightback against road danger, alongside a ‘vision zero’ approach that acknowledges that any number of road deaths is unacceptable.

People on foot and bike bore the brunt of the rise:

  • Pedestrian deaths rose by 12% to 446, accounting for three quarters of the overall rise in fatalities.
  • Serious injuries to cyclists rose by 8% to 3,401, continuing a long term trend that has been ongoing since 2004.

Worryingly, traffic levels in 2014 were 2.4% higher than in 2013. Air pollution is estimated to cause 24,000 deaths a year in the UK, half attributable to road transport [1].  The number of cars is set to increase by 43% by 2035 and traffic delays by 50% [2].

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: “We should be under no illusions as to the seriousness of these figures. The government needs to get a grip of this situation, and it can start by reintroducing ambitious casualty reduction targets, with an ultimate aim of reducing deaths and serious injuries on our roads to zero. We know from running our helpline for devastated road crash victims that every road death causes unimaginable human suffering, and every one is preventable. The increases in serious casualties among pedestrians and cyclists are especially horrifying, given the importance of protecting vulnerable road users and enabling people to walk and cycle more.

“At a time when car manufacturers have serious questions to answer on vehicle emissions, it is worrying to see a growth in vehicle traffic. The price for this is being paid by individuals, families and the planet, and it’s not a price worth paying. That’s why our theme for this year’s Road Safety Week, Drive less, live more, is focused on encouraging people to think again about why, when and how we drive private vehicles.”

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

 [1] The Cost of Air Pollution, OECD (2014)

 [2] Keeping the Nation Moving – Time to face the facts, RAC Foundation (2011)

 

Brake launches ‘Drive less, live more’ interactive resource to reduce car journeys and make streets safer in the run up to Road Safety Week

Wednesday 4th November
Contact e:
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive resource in the lead up to Road Safety Week 23–29 November 2015, with the theme'Drive less, live more'. Developed in partnership with AIG and Specsavers, the resource encourages everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by reducing car journeys and walking, cycling or using public transport instead.

Every day five people die on UK roads, and over 60 are seriously injured – resulting in needless devastation, trauma and suffering1. The vast majority of casualties are down to driver error. Road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are crucial. It’s about doing what we can to protect ourselves and the people around us to make our streets safer. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all.

Many people walk the few metres from their front door to the car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A shocking four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles2. Brake is asking everyone this Road Safety Week to consider how they use roads, and pledge to leave their car at home, at least for some journeys.

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only makes our streets safer by reducing traffic danger, but has personal benefits too. It can save money in car costs; help people live more active lives; reduce stress and illness; reinvigorate communities; and cut congestion and pollution.

The open-access‘Drive less, live more’ resource can be used to facilitate discussion about the importance of driving less. It can be used by anyone who works with drivers, including: fleet professionals and employers; driving instructors; road safety professionals and emergency services; teachers; community leaders; and by individuals directly wanting to see how they can help themselves and their community by driving less. Brake is especially encouraging families to use theDrive less, live more resource to reduce school-run and commuter traffic, and asking businesses to manage at-work journeys.

Access the resource online now atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessinteractive.

Gary Rae, Director of Communications and Campaigns, said: Our new ‘Drive less, live more’ e-learning resource shows people the benefits of walking, cycling or taking public transport, particularly for shorter journeys. The resource is a powerful tool that shows that by driving less, you can improve road safety and prevent casualties, become more active, and protect the planet. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, employers, driving instructors and educators to help them raise awareness of the benefits of active and sustainable transport.”

The facts

By 2035 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 45% and traffic delays by 64%3.

Four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles – short enough to replace with a pleasant walk or cycle ride. Currently, one in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of our children are driven to school4, even though the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles5.

One in four adults in England is obese and a further 37% are overweight6. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year7. Incorporating activity like walking and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight8, and can help guard against serious illnesses such as asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers9.

Commuting by public transport can also improve overall fitness. People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have been shown to have a lower BMI and a healthier bodyweight10.

Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs11. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling12.

Groups can register to take part atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors Specsavers and AIG.

The theme of Road Safety Week 2015, 23-29 November, is about making our roads and communities safer, happier places for everyone, by encouraging people to‘Drive less, live more’.

Brake has been running this successful event for 17 years, growing its reach and impact. We now share our experience globally atwww.roadsafetyweek.org, to help others run Road Safety Weeks and similar events in other countries.

Five people die every day on UK roads and around 60 are seriously injured. Brake’s priority is tackling these devastating tragedies, and making our streets safe for people to use without fear or threat. Reducing traffic is an important part of this.

Brake’s main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or the BrakeBlog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2010

[3] Road Transport Forecasts 2011, Department for Transport, 2011

[4] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[5] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[6] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, 2013 NHS, 2013

[7] Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, et al., ‘Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd Ed)’, Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[8] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[9] NHShttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx, 2015

[10] Flint Ellen, Cummins Steven, Sacker Amanda, ‘Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index:  population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom’, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[11] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[12] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Brake warns of gridlock Britain

12 Nov 2015
Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

  • Motor vehicle traffic has increased, for the tenth quarter in succession
  • 2% increase in vehicle traffic
  • The provisional figure of 316.1 billion vehicle miles is the highest rolling annual total ever

The Department for Transport today (12 November 2015) released provisional statistics that show Britons are using more cars, van and lorries than ever before. Van traffic continued to rise faster than any other vehicle type, increasing by 6.0% to a new peak of 46.9 billion vehicle miles.

The report suggests that this rise is partly due to the growth in the economy as well as lower fuel prices. Traffic on motorways and rural roads was higher than it has ever been.

The figures should “give cause for alarm”, says Gary Rae, campaigns director for road safety charity, Brake:

He said: “These rises are not sustainable. We’re in our 20th year and in that time, we’ve seen an increase of 19% in all traffic. In a report published earlier this year, the Department for Transport forecast is for traffic growth of 19% to 55% between 2010 and 2040. Back in 2011, the RAC Foundation reported that the number of cars was set to increase by 43% by 2035 and traffic delays by 50%.”

“The figures are heading the wrong way and we’re heading for gridlock. The government needs to get a grip and outline what it intends to do. During Road Safety Week (23-29 November), we’ll be revealing the impact on our health and the environment of these ever rising figures.”

Notes to Editors

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

Brake's Kids Walk 2018 What Happened

On 13 June 2018 over 120,000 kids from schools across the UK walked for safer roads and to help Brake call for footpaths, cycle paths, safe places to cross, slow traffic and clean traffic; five important road safety messages so we can stop the 5 children who are being killed or hurt on our roads every single day! The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling to school within their community.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to engage pupils with road safety and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

You can read our evaluation report here.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2018 did on the day. Follow @Brakecharity on Twitter and use #BrakesKidsWalk for more pictures.

 

BKW2018 YH Penshurst Group 2More than 450 children from Penshurst Primary School walked around their community in Hessle, Hull. They held a school assembly the week before the walk, ensuring the kids were engaged with road safety. The pupils then made their own banners, including Kids Walk placards, to take on the walk along with the Brake posters from the action pack. Pupils from Hessle High School, Brake mascot Zak the Zebra and a safety officer from Humberside Fire and Rescue Service joined the walk and helped the children to campaign for safer roads. Their activities were captured by ITV Calendar and many local radio stations. The children also raised £1,000 for Brake through sponsorship.

BKW2018 E Arthur Bugler BrakePupils at Arthur Bugler Primary School in Essex raised £1,200 for Brake by getting friends and family to sponsor them for their Kids Walk. The school used the template sponsorship form in their action pack to encourage parents to give generously and support Brake’s work supporting road crash victims and campaigning for safer roads. The children carried banners and posters from their action pack during the walk, to show residents the things they need to keep them safe near roads. Brake mascot Zak the Zebra visited the school after the event to thank the children.

BKW2018 Rockingham Primary School 2

Corby Borough Council’s rural pride officer Suzanne Preston helped the children at Rockingham Primary School run their Brake’s Kids Walk. She was joined by their local neighbourhood wardens to talk to the kids about road safety. They ran an assembly for the school, talking about the health and planet-saving benefits of walking. During the walk, the kids were encouraged to hold up their hand when they spotted a road safety object.

“Brake’s Kids Walk provided a great way for us to discuss road safety from a different perspective and we helped make it relevant to the children's local area.” – Suzanne Preston, rural pride officer, Corby Borough Council.

BKW2018 SW The Castle Primary School 2Around 300 pupils from The Castle Primary School walked in crocodile formation around the school grounds to raise awareness of road safety in Tiverton, Devon. Children had banners and posters as they called for safer roads, so they can walk in their communities without fear of traffic and pollution. The school featured on their local BBC Spotlight evening news programme and also raised £217.34 for Brake.

“We have really appreciated having the opportunity to join in with such a worthwhile campaign. Keeping our children safe is paramount and this includes road safety.” - Sue Palk, high-level teaching assistant, The Castle Primary School

BKW2018 Wales St Helens 6Children at St Helen’s Catholic Primary School in Barry, Wales, made full use of the bilingual resources provided in the Kids Walk action pack. They proudly held up banners and posters in Welsh and English to make sure the whole community was aware of what they want to keep them safe. The children also made their own banners, calling on adults to keep them safe when using roads. Posters about the benefits of walking to school were displayed around the school. While on the walk, children talked to residents about why they were taking part and the importance of road safety.St Christophers School Wales


In Wrexham, St Christopher’s School held a Wear Your Stripes Day to raise funds for Brake. They also made traffic light biscuits and stripy cupcakes and collected sponsorship money for their walk, raising a fantastic £157 for Brake. In class they completed the action pack resources, to ensure that they were focused on road safety issues during their walk and made zebra masks to wear to look like our mascot Zak the Zebra.

BKW2018 London Salisbury Primary School2
The children and staff at Salisbury Primary School in London dressed in their stripiest clothes as they combined their Kids Walk with a Wear Your Stripes Day. The pupils designed their own banners and posters during classroom activities, before taking them on their walk to call for safer streets. They walked around the community close to their school to promote road safety measures such as 20mph speed limits and safe crossing places. Their fundraising activities helped raise £150 for Brake.

Dgp3vZwW4AA8O6U


Pupils from St Colm’s High School in Draperstown, Northern Ireland, teamed up with their local primary school – St Mary’s Primary School – to help them with their walk. Pupils involved in both schools used the resources from the action pack to help inspire other pupils and the local community about what they want to see to make their roads safer. They organised a walk around the local town, displaying banners to help raise awareness of important road safety issues. They even helped out the community by carrying out a clean-up of the town, litter picking as they went on their walk and the school donated £50 to Brake.

Zak 1PC Michael Goldie, school campus officer for Police Scotland, took Brake mascot Zak the Zebra on a tour of primary schools in East Renfrewshire. He visited Hillview, Neilston, St John’s, St Mark’s, and St Thomas’ primary schools, ensuring that more than 1,000 kids put their best feet forward to promote road safety and the health benefits of walking. PC Goldie delivered a number of assemblies before the pupils made their own posters and banners to take on the walk. Parents, volunteers from the local high school, school crossing officers from East Renfrewshire Council and emergency services joined the schools on their walks through the community. They walked to their local park to celebrate their achievements, where the police and fire services talked to the kids about road safety.

BKW2018 O Save Life Gambia 7
In Serrekunda, The Gambia, Save Life Gambia partnered with Maarif Turkish International School, the police and the WHO Country Office to run Brake’s Kids Walk. Parents joined the schoolchildren on their walk around the community, engaging them with road safety messages and calling for better safety measures to keep them safe from traffic. They printed out posters and banners from the online action pack and delivered an assembly, inspiring the children to talk more to adults about how they can keep them safe.

This project is kindly sponsored by: Co op

Kids walk foot border long

Call for zero road deaths as casualty reduction stalls

news@brake.org.uk

29 September 2016

Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the government to take action and reduce the numbers of deaths and injuries on our roads. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that reductions in road casualties are beginning to stall. Brake is calling on the government to act now to prevent stagnation in the long-term.

The Department for Transport report published today confirms that outside of a few minor gains road casualty reductions have remained largely static; and while we welcome the slight drop in road deaths and serious injuries on our roads, more must be done to speed up the process of road casualty reduction.

Worryingly, vehicle traffic has risen by almost 2% in the last year, matched by a significant population increase of 15% over the past 30 years; meaning as well as the increased danger of crashes, we are seeing increased pollution [1]. Much of this increase is being attributed to light goods vehicles, many running on diesel, which of course we have now learned is much more damaging to the environment than previously claimed.

Lucy Amos, research advisor for Brake, said: “The report released by the Department for Transport reveals the danger of complacency and over-confidence. The UK currently has one of the best road safety records in the world, but this cannot be relied upon. No road death is acceptable and we must continue to work towards reducing death and injury on the roads without compromise.

This is why Brake is calling for the reintroduction of ambitious casualty reduction targets to act as a driving force for the fight against road death and injury at the national level; increased investment in road infrastructure to develop a safe and sustainable road network; and more resources assigned to road traffic police to ensure that legislation can be effectively enforced.”

Tweet us:@Brakecharity,

ENDS.

Notes to Editors:

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Department for Transport, 2016

Communities plagued by traffic

lollipopladyPlagued by speeding traffic? No safe place to cross the road? Inadequate pavements and no cycle paths? Want to help educate local drivers and children about how to use roads more safely? Then do something about it!

Visit our community campaign kit full of tips and advice on running your local campaign. 

Support Brake's national campaigns in government to stop the carnage.

Help Brake and spread the road safety word by fundraising for the charity in your town or village.

 

Cyclists

cyclistCycling is the environmental solution to urban traffic problems and also brilliant for your health - unless you are knocked off your bike of course. On many roads there are enormous risks to cyclists from lack of cycling paths and speeding traffic, particularly on rural roads and in town. Children in particular are often not allowed out on their bikes due to traffic danger, leading to obesity and lack of independence.

Brake supports many families whose loved one has been killed on their bike.

Get involved in Brake's campaign in government for slower speed limits and facilities for cyclists and pedestrians. Find out more...

Read our advice for cyclists on our Cycle for life pages...

Fundraise for Brake's campaigns and support services by organising a sponsored bike ride in aid of the charity. Find out more...

In association with:

brainandspinalinjuries.co.uk

Direct Line Group Lesson Plan

 

Props – Take a sturdy toy truck that rolls in a straight line, and a torch.  Today we’re going to talk about ROAD SAFETY.

I’m going to start by telling you something really sad. Every day seven children are very badly hurt by traffic on roads in this country while those children are walking or on bikes. We’ve all fallen down and hurt our knees haven’t we? Children who are hurt on our roads are much more badly hurt than that. Some are so badly hurt that they don’t get better.

I’m now going to tell you something really good. We can all learn really easy things to keep us safer near roads and we’re going to do this in this lesson, so we can STAY SAFE.

Can anyone tell me some kinds of traffic? (Car/ Bus / Truck / Fire engine / Motorbike etc.)

Can anyone do the NOISES that this traffic makes? (Children make traffic noises)

That’s one of the useful things about traffic. You can sometimes use your EARS to hear it coming.

Traffic isn’t just noisy, it’s also FAST. This means it comes quickly. Does anyone know why traffic can move so fast, faster than you on legs? (Wheels)

Let’s do an experiment, to see if wheels are faster than legs
(Child chosen to then walk sensibly across the hall holding hands with you, while a solid, toy truck (use a big one that goes in a straight line) is rolled across the hall at the same time – the truck will move much faster.)
 
Traffic is also HARD. Prod your tummy. Is it soft or hard? (Soft)
This is why traffic can hurt you. You are soft and traffic is hard.

We’ve found out that traffic is NOISY, FAST AND HARD AND CAN HURT US. So let’s all clap our hands for learning these important lessons.  (Children clap)

Hands are good for clapping. What else can we use hands for to keep us safe on roads?
(Holding hands)

What other bits of our body can we use to keep us safe on roads (pointing to eyes and ears)
(Eyes and ears)

That’s right, we have to look for traffic, and we have to listen for traffic. Sometimes we have to look very carefully and listen very carefully because traffic might be far away or round a corner, but we know it might get to us fast.

I know a rhyme that we can learn today. Are you ready? Listen carefully so you can copy me when I say it again.

I STOP before I cross the street,
I use my EYES and my EARS before my FEET.
(holding up hand to indicate ‘stop’ then pointing to eyes, ears and then feet)

(Repeat with the children.)

Now we’re going to play my thumbs up, thumbs down game. If you think that I am saying something sensible and safe, stick your thumb up. If you think I am saying something daft and dangerous, stick your thumb down.

•    My balloon has gone into the road and I am going to run after it
•    I want to cross the road and there is a green man showing.
•    I want to cross the road but there is a red man showing.
•    My best friend is further up the road but they haven’t seen me, so I want to run ahead of my mum to catch them up.
•    I’m going to play in the park away from roads
•    I’m in the car but I think we are going to be late for a party. I tell my dad to drive faster.

(Children stick thumbs up and down. Use as the basis of discussion. Why are these things safe or dangerous? What do the children think?)

I think we’ve all done very well there and thought very hard about how to stay safe. Let’s give ourselves another round of applause.
(clapping)

Logo-12-directlinegroup

Drivers raise motorway safety fears as lorry traffic hits record high

News from Brake
Friday, 13 July 2018
 
The amount of freight being transported on our motorways is making drivers fear for their safety, a new survey of over 1,000 drivers for Brake has found [1]. The findings come as the Government publishes figures which show that lorry traffic on motorways has increased more than 15% in five years, reaching a record high of 7.9 billion vehicle miles in 2017 [2].
 
More than three-quarters of drivers stated that too much freight is being transported on our motorways and have called for further investment in railways to alleviate the pressure on the network. Shockingly, more than a quarter of drivers thought it highly likely or likely that they would be involved in a fatal or serious crash on a motorway or dual carriageway at some point in the future. These findings come as the Government is introducing truck platooning trials and all-lane running on our motorways, leading road safety campaigners to decry the prioritisation of capacity over safety.

The Brake survey found that a significant majority of drivers, 77%, believe that truck platooning “sounds frightening”, even after having the nature of the technology explained to them, and that “if it went wrong the casualties could be very high.” Drivers also expressed doubt over all-lane running, as when asked if using the hard shoulder as a driving lane would improve safety, only a third agreed.
 
The Government’s “Road Traffic Estimates: Great Britain 2017”, published last week (5 July), shows that lorry traffic on motorways reached a new peak of 7.9 billion vehicle miles in 2017. The size and weight of lorries is also increasing - traffic of lorries with four or more axles was 44% higher in 2017 than in 1997, whereas for lorries with less than four axles it had fallen by 27%.
 
Joshua Harris, Brake’s director of campaigns, said:
“At a time when the traffic on our motorways is sharply increasing, these findings show that drivers have a deep-seated and genuine concern over their safety on these roads. Drivers are particularly wary over the increase in freight traffic and it’s clear that trials of truck platooning will only exacerbate this concern. We urge the Government to prioritise safety over capacity and to ensure that any change to our road environment, such as all-lane running, is robustly tested, and the public properly informed, before the roll-out on our roads.”
 
 Phillipa Edmunds, freight on rail manager, Campaign for Better Transport, said:
“Drivers’ fear of freight on our motorways is well founded, with the latest Government figures showing that HGVs are almost three times more likely than cars to be involved in fatal crashes on these roads. Transferring more freight to the railways is a key part of making our roads safer, cleaner and less congested so we urge the Government to take note of this report’s important findings.”
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors: 
 
[1] Full survey data available in Brake report “Our Strategic Road Network - PT. 2: Smart roads: put safety first”.
 
[2] Road Traffic Estimates, Great Britain 2017, Department for Transport, 5 July 2018
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.  We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 

Make traffic policing and casualty reduction a priority, says charity, as half of drivers admit flouting traffic laws

Tuesday 28 April 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

A report released today (28 April 2015) by road safety charity Brake and Direct Line has revealed worrying and widespread disregard for traffic laws among UK drivers, with half (49%) admitting to breaking them.

Half of drivers who admit breaking traffic laws (25% of all drivers) say they do so through inattention, while the other half (23% of all drivers) admit doing so deliberately, because they think they can get away with it or do not agree with the laws. This makes it clear that more needs to be done both to enforce traffic laws, and to persuade drivers to buy in to the importance of complying with them.

With dedicated traffic police numbers being continually cut back in recent years [1], Brake is concerned that UK roads are becoming increasingly lawless territory. Police officers have reported that they have been forced to “retreat” from motorways, major and rural roads [2]. At the same time, road deaths and serious injuries recently increased by 4% after decades of reductions [3]. This follows government casualty reduction targets being dropped in 2010, against the advice of road safety experts including Brake.

Brake is calling on any new government to reverse this trend and make traffic enforcement a national policing priority, alongside giving greater impetus to bringing casualties down and making streets safer.

Other key findings from Brake and Direct Line’s report on the state of UK driving include:

  • UK drivers are more confident in the safety of their own driving than they were 10 years ago, with more than two thirds (69%) rating themselves as safer than most other drivers, up from half (50%) in 2005. Drivers judge each other more harshly than themselves, with the majority (58%) saying there are more dangerous drivers than safe drivers on UK roads.
  • Young drivers (17-24) are most likely to rate their driving as safer than others, with three in five (58%) saying they are “much” safer. Given young drivers are proportionately involved in more crashes than older drivers [4], this suggests overconfidence is putting them at risk. Young drivers are more likely to rate the majority of other drivers as dangerous and to feel endangered by them, suggesting they may be more aware of bad habits that become habitual for experienced drivers.
  • When asked what unsafe driving behaviours they witnessed most, distraction (such as from mobile phones) (71%), tailgating (71%), speeding (67%) and risking overtaking (66%) topped the list of UK drivers’ concerns.

Find out more about the state of UK driving by viewing the full report here.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“As these figures make clear, law breaking on our roads is not just down to a minority but endemic. For whatever reason, many seem to feel they are beyond the law or that traffic laws are somehow optional. This represents a failure by government to ensure traffic policing is receiving adequate priority and to make clear the importance and legitimacy of traffic laws. Traffic laws exist to save lives and prevent injuries and terrible suffering. No matter how experienced or skilled a driver you believe yourself to be, you cannot break them safely.

“Whoever takes power after 7 May needs to make traffic policing a national policing priority, to ensure there is a strong deterrent against risky law-breaking on roads. We also need to see road safety given greater political priority, to set casualties falling once more and deliver safer streets for communities everywhere. That means reintroducing road casualty reduction targets, and working harder to win the ideological battle, to ensure everyone who gets behind the wheel understands why the rules exist and accepts their responsibility to abide by them and keep people safe.”

Rob Miles, director of motor at Direct Line,commented: “Drivers continue to flout the rules of the road without realising the devastating impact their actions can have. Traffic laws are there for a reason and breaking them puts lives at risk. 

“Breaking the law whilst behind the wheel can lead to a criminal conviction and being declined for car insurance, with even minor offences leading to fines and increased insurance premiums.”

Brake campaigns for stronger traffic enforcement through itscrackdown campaign. Tweet us:@Brakecharity, hashtag #crackdown. Read the survey report.

Facts

  • Traffic police numbers in England and Wales have fallen by 23% in the past four years, from 5,635 in March 2010 to 4,356 in March 2014 [5]. This continues a trend, highlighted by Brake, which has been ongoing since at least 2008.
  • It is not just overall numbers of traffic police that are falling, but their strength as a proportion of all police officers, down from 3.9% in 2010 to 3.4% in 2014 [6].
  • The most recent national road casualty figures showed that deaths and serious injuries increased by 4% in the year ending September 2014, with deaths up by 1%. Child casualties also saw their first rolling year increase in 20 years [7].

About the report

These survey results come from Section 1 of Report 3: A risky business, part of the Direct Line and Brake reports on safe driving, 2015-17, released today (Tuesday 28 April 2015). The survey consisted of 1,000 drivers and was conducted by Surveygoo. See the report.

Full results

Q1: How do you think the safety of your driving compares with other drivers on the roads today?

  • 0% said they are much more dangerous than most drivers (0% 17-24)
  • 1% said they are slightly more dangerous than most drivers (0% 17-24)
  • 29% said they are about average (19% 17-24)
  • 30% said they are slightly safer than most drivers (23% 17-24)
  • 39% said they are much safer than most drivers (58% 17-24)

Q2: In the past 12 months, what has been your impression of the standard of driving on UK roads?

  • 1% said the roads are full of safe drivers (0% 17-24)
  • 41% said there are more safe drivers than dangerous drivers (20% 17-24)
  • 43% said there are more dangerous drivers than safe drivers (68% 17-24)
  • 15% said the roads are full of dangerous drivers (12% 17-24)

Q3: In the past 12 months, how often have you felt endangered by the behaviour of other drivers?

  • 2% said every time I drive (0% 17-24)
  • 14% said most times I drive (24% 17-24)
  • 56% said sometimes (51% 17-24)
  • 24% said rarely (19% 17-24)
  • 4% said never (5% 17-24)

Q4: In the past 12 months, what kinds of unsafe driving behaviour have you witnessed and been concerned about?

  • 71% said distraction (e.g. by mobile phones, eating/drinking, or any other activity at the wheel unrelated to driving)
  • 71% said tailgating/driving too close to other vehicles
  • 67% said speeding
  • 66% said risky overtaking
  • 59% said turning, pulling out or changing lanes without looking properly
  • 39% said drifting/swerving across lanes or straddling more than one lane
  • 38% said running red lights
  • 29% said road-rage
  • 18% said poor vehicle maintenance
  • 2% said none of the above
  • 0% said they don’t know

Q5: Breaking traffic laws: which statement is most applicable to you?

  • 51% said: I never break traffic laws (60% female, 42% male)
  • 24% said: I break traffic laws sometimes because I’m not paying attention (23% female, 26% male)
  • 12% said: I break traffic laws sometimes because I think I can get away with it (8% female, 16% male)
  • 9% said: I break traffic laws sometimes because I think the laws are wrong/unnecessary (6% female, 13% male)
  • 2% said: I break traffic laws frequently because I think I can get away with it (1% female, 3% male)
  • 1% said: I break traffic laws frequently because I’m not paying attention (1% female, 1% male)
  • 0% said: I break traffic laws frequently because I think the laws are wrong/unnecessary (0% female, 0% male)

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on Twitter or Facebook. Follow Julie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line

Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or on-line.

Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. UK Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0845 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com.

End notes

[1] Figures were released by the Ministry of Justice in response to aparliamentary question from Jack Dromey MP to Michael Penning MP, Minister of State for Justice, 2 February 2015

[2]Dramatic rise in road deaths as numbers of traffic police fall, The Independent, 1 February 2015

[3]Increase in road casualties should be wake up call for politicians, says charity, Brake, 5 February 2015

[4] Drivers aged 17-19 only make up 1.5% of UK licence holders, but are involved in 12% of fatal and serious crashes.New research highlights need for graduated driving licensing, Transport Research Laboratory, 2014. SeeBrake’s young driver fact page for more information on this issue.

[5]Figures were released by the Ministry of Justice in response to aparliamentary question from Jack Dromey MP to Michael Penning MP, Minister of State for Justice, 2 February 2015

[6] Ibid

[7]Reported road casualties in Great Britain, provisional estimates: Jul to Sep 2014, Department for Transport, 5 February 2015

Nigel Evans MP wins award for rural road safety efforts

News from Brake
Friday 31 August 2018
 
Nigel Evans, MP for the Ribble Valley, has today been named as Road Safety Parliamentarian of the Month for August 2018, by Brake, the road safety charity, and Direct Line Group.
 
The award recognises Nigel’s efforts to improve road safety in his constituency, in particular work to improve rural road safety - a priority issue for Brake as the majority of road deaths occur on these roads. Nigel has been leading the charge for road safety in recent months by tackling dangerous speeding on Pendleton Road, successfully lobbying for a roundabout to be installed at the dangerous Sabden Junction on the A59, and calling for extra money from Government to accelerate the repair of the many bad potholes in his constituency.
 
Nigel’s most recent effort to improve road safety in his constituency has focussed on tackling speeding motorists on the rural roads in and around Pendleton. Nigel was motivated to tackle this issue after witnessing motorists speeding through the village of Pendleton and was concerned about the risk posed to children, who are some of our most vulnerable road users. Nigel has requested traffic calming measures be installed by Lancashire County Council and spoke with the Chief Constable of Lancashire Police calling for greater enforcement of the speed limits.
 
Brake has long recognised the dangers of speed on rural roads. Most rural roads in the UK have a 60mph limit, the national default for single carriageway roads, however, such roads are often unsuitable for high speeds as they are narrow, with blind bends, and no pavements or cycle paths. Brake wants to see constituency activity by parliamentarians on rural roads, supported by government action at a national level. Brake is calling for a reduction in the national default speed limit on rural roads to deliver slower, safer roads.
 
Brake will also be using Road Safety Week 2018 to get their message across about the dangers of rural roads. Rural roads pose a significant risk to vulnerable road users such as motorcyclists and cyclists – the focus of this year’s Road Safety Week theme ‘Bike Smart’. Brake will be reiterating its calls for a reduced national default limit to protect the safety of all road users and particularly the most vulnerable.
 
Joshua Harris, Director of Campaigns for Brake, the road safety charity, said:
 
 
“Brake is delighted to recognise Nigel’s commitment to road safety in his constituency with this award – it is thoroughly deserved. His campaign to tackle speeding on rural roads should be especially highlighted; the majority of road deaths in Britain happen on rural roads, and the cause is often speed-related.
 
“Rural road safety is a key focus of the Government’s new two-year road safety action plan. The Government must grasp this opportunity to improve rural road safety and introduce a lower default speed limit.  Slower speeds save lives and help make our streets more liveable environments for all.”
 
 
Accepting his award, Nigel Evans MP said:
 
 
“I’m grateful for this recognition which raises the importance of this issue- as it is literally life and death, and life changing when people, Governments and local authorities get it wrong.
 
“I have just completed a tour of my constituency with 42 stops at villages throughout the Ribble Valley where I’ve dealt with concerns of my constituents. The number one top issue has been speeding traffic, dangerous driving and the state of the roads. I met one cyclist who had been thrown from her bicycle and suffered bruises because she hit a pothole.
 
“Since raising Pendleton’s woes many people contacted me about their own areas traffic issues with calls for average speed cameras in rural and residential areas. I hope that the concerns of genuinely worried residents will now be taken seriously and urgently before more deaths and injuries and misery occurs.”
 
Gus Park, Managing Director of Motor Insurance at Direct Line Group, said:
 
"We applaud Nigel's efforts as we see so many crashes at junctions, especially when drivers are turning right. We have also seen an increase in pothole related damage to vehicles and welcome all Nigel's campaigning to make these roads safer."
 
ENDS
 
For further information contact: news@brake.org.uk
 
Notes to Editors:
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.
About Direct Line Insurance Group plc
 
Direct Line Group is headquartered in Bromley. Through its number of well known brands the Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. The Group also provides insurance services for third parties through its partnerships division, Direct Line Group Partnerships. In the commercial sector, the Group's NIG and Direct Line for Business operations offer insurance products for businesses distributed through brokers or direct, respectively.

Safety concerns are barrier to delivering walking and cycling benefits, says charity

Tuesday 10 February 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

A guidance report released today (10 February 2015) by road safety charity Brake suggests that fears over safety by young people and their parents are posing a serious barrier to young people walking and cycling, preventing great benefits being delivered to health and wellbeing.

Brake surveyed 1,301 11-17 year olds in secondary schools and colleges across the UK, finding almost half (47%) said parental worries were preventing them from starting cycling or cycling more.

Increased walking and cycling promise huge economic and public health benefits, with recent research claiming that hitting ambitious cycling targets could net the nation £248 billion by 2050 [1].

However, fears over safety act as a persistent barrier to cycling take-up in the UK and to promoting more active lifestyles (see facts below). Brake’s report also found:

  • two in five (38%) 11-17 year olds cite a lack of safe routes as a barrier to cycling
  • four in 10 (41%) think traffic in their area is too fast for the safety of people on foot and bike
  • nearly four in 10 (37%) think their area needs more pavements, paths and cycle paths

With 504 12-15 year olds killed or seriously injured while walking, and 186 while cycling, in the UK in 2013 [2], these concerns are understandable and must be addressed.

The findings reinforce the urgent need for a cycling and walking investment strategy, as proposed by the government as part of the Infrastructure Bill making its way through parliament. The proposal has been welcomed by Brake and many other road safety, sustainable transport and public health organisations. Brake believes it is critical that the Infrastructure Bill includes a long term commitment to investing in more segregated routes to improve the safety – and perceived safety – of walking and cycling.

The widespread adoption of 20mph limits in cities, towns and villages is also critical to creating safe and inviting walking and cycling environments. 20mph limits are a tried and tested way to cut pedestrian and cyclist casualties [3], and increase levels of walking and cycling [4]. In the run-up to the general election, through its GO 20 campaign, Brake is calling on all parties to include a commitment to 20mph as the default urban speed limit as a key manifesto pledge.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“All parents want their children to be healthy and happy, and many would love to see them walking and cycling more to achieve that. Young people want this too: it’s crucial to their health, wellbeing, and social and economic lives that they can get around easily and cheaply. That so many teenagers are being held back from walking and cycling by safety fears, in spite of its great benefits, is a shocking indictment of our road infrastructure. With the car as king in transport planning, walkers and cyclists have been for too long treated as second-class citizens. The safety of people on foot and bike is hugely important, as is enabling more people to make sustainable, active travel choices without fear of traffic danger. It is vital that the government builds this into long term transport planning, through the Infrastructure Bill, investment in safe walking and cycling routes, and making 20mph limits the norm in towns, cities and villages.”

Educators, youth workers and road safety professionals can recieve a free copy of the report from this form.

About Brake’s GO 20 campaign

Brake is part of a broad coalition of organisations calling for more local authorities to adopt widespread 20mph limits, and for the government to make 20mph the national urban default, through its GO 20 campaign. Tweet us:@Brakecharity, hashtag #GO20.

Why GO 20?

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have far more time to react in an emergency. Studies show when 20 limits replace 30, there are fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [5].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [6].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution:GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [7]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [8]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [9]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [10]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

The facts: sustainable and active travel

For the population of England, in 2013, 64% of all trips were by car as a driver or passenger, 22% of all trips were on foot, and 1% by bike. Trips made on foot have declined by 30% since 1995 [11].

Two-thirds of British adults are overweight or obese, as are a third of students in year six (ages 10-11). Obese children tend to become obese adults. Safe walking and cycling is a key component of the government’s scheme to combat obesity [12].

Road danger is a major barrier in encouraging more people to walk and cycle. Eight in 10 people (79%) say they would walk and cycle more if local roads were safer [13].

Case studies

Steven Atkinson, 12, from Sunderland, was pushing his bike across Chester Road in 2009 when he was hit by a speeding driver. He was rushed to hospital, where he died from his injuries. Find out more.

Violet Atkinson, Steven’s mother, says: “After everything Steven went through, I am so proud of him. He never looked at his health as a problem and lived every day to the full. No words can describe the grief our family has gone through since his death. There’s a piece of us missing and there’s no way to escape that. My son is gone. I will never see him again, and it will never get easier. I don’t want another mother to experience the pain of seeing her child die. I’m appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for pedestrians and cyclists. And I’m backing Brake’s calls for government to invest in safer streets for walking and cycling, for children, families and people of all ages.’’

Guy Preston, 18, from Beverley was knocked from his bike in 2010 by a car travelling along the A1079. He spent three weeks in hospital suffering terrible pain and lost the majority of his childhood memories, alongside the ability to run or play football. Find out more.

Guy says: “Those three weeks after the crash were some of my darkest moments. Going from being so independent to needing support with every activity is a crushing blow to an individual’s self-esteem. My family was my rock, but every day was an immense struggle, and I felt lonely and isolated. Throughout my three years at university, my injuries were still a burden. To this day, I experience constant pain and aching in my left leg. On a good day, I can tolerate the aching, but on a bad day, I am unable to walk and confined to my bed. Despite my disabilities, I am hopeful for the future. I will never be able to run again. I will never be able to dance at my wedding, or play football with my children. I have lost almost all my memories from my childhood, and I still struggle to remember things in my day-to-day life. But I realise I am lucky to be alive. I’m fully behind Brake’s campaign to stop people being injured and killed while walking and cycling. We all should be able to get around without fearing for our lives.’’

Notes to editors

About the report

These figures come from the Brake guidance report: ‘safer walking and cycling for secondary students’, released today (10 February 2015). It is based on a survey of 1,301 11-17 year-olds, created and promoted by Brake and carried out by secondary schools and colleges across the UK in 2013-14 through ‘hands-up’ surveys in 61 lessons, assemblies and workshops.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Research shows growth in cycling could be worth £1/4 trillion, CTC, 2015http://www.ctc.org.uk/news/20150120-research-shows-growth-cycling-worth-%25C2%25BC-trillion-england%25E2%2580%2599s-economy
[2] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[3]For example,20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[4]Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20%Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012
[5] For example,20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[6] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20%Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012
[7]Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999
[8] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion.At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004
[9] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012
[10] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used theWorld Health Organisation’s Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling.Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012.  Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy.  Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012
[11] Travel Survey: England 2013, Department for Transport, 2014https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/342160/nts2013-01.pdf
[12] Obesity and the environment: increasing physical activity and active travel, Public Health England, 2013https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/256796/Briefing_Obesity_and_active_travel_final.pdf
[13] Eight in 10 back 20mph limits as charity takes campaign to parliament, Brake, 2014,http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1202-go20reception

Seven in 10 people believe more parents would ditch the car for the school run if the journey was safer on foot

15 June 2016

news@brake.org.uk

  • 72% think more children would walk/cycle if routes to school were safer
  • 38% scared of traffic in their neighbourhood
  • 65% think school routes should be made safer for walkers and cyclists
  • 67% want more walking paths and dedicated cycle paths

A survey to mark Brake’s 2016 Giant Walk has revealed that many people feel frightened when they make journeys on foot or by bike. It also shows most people think far more families would walk and cycle to school, if they felt it was safer to do so.

Brake’s annual Giant Walk, supported by Ageas, sees thousands of children from schools across the UK holding walking events to support road safety and highlight the benefits that walking and cycling can bring for both individuals and the planet as a whole. The children will also be reminding people that fast and dangerous driving can put young lives at risk, and encouraging drivers to slow down and look out for people on foot and bike.

The UK has a poor record for protecting children on foot and bike compared to many of our European neighbours[i]. Half of our children are driven to school, resulting in more danger to vulnerable road users in the area, damage to health and the environment from a rise in pollution, and the increased health risk associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

38% of those questioned in the study told Brake they have felt scared by traffic while out walking or cycling in their neighbourhood. 65% of people believe more should be done to make routes to schools safer for children on foot and bike. More than two thirds of those questioned (67%) said they would like there to be more paths, cycle paths and crossings in their neighbourhood that they could use to get about more easily.

Slower speeds are especially important for protecting children. In 2014, 53 children under 16 were killed and 2,029 were seriously injured on British roads: that’s almost six children seriously hurt or killed every day. The majority (80%) were on foot or bicycle at the time[ii]. Research has found that children cannot judge the speed of approaching vehicles travelling faster than 20mph, so may believe it is safe to cross when it is not[iii].

Another recent study for Brake[iv] saw 44% of drivers admit they have broken a 20mph speed limit by at least 5mph in the last year, with one in five (20%) confessing they do it every week.  

Brake wants more people to choose to walk or cycle, if they can, and to encourage people to do this, we must have lower speed limits, dedicated cycle lanes, wide pavements and safe places to cross the road. 

Lowering traffic speed limits to 20mph, specifically, is known to reduce casualties and create a safer road environment, especially for people on foot and bicycle. Analysis of 75 20mph-limit sites in Scotland found casualties dropped 42%[v]. 20mph or 30km/h limits are recommended by the World Health Organisation as a key measure to improve pedestrian safety and save lives[vi].

Almost six in 10 people (58%) think the best thing we can do to keep kids safe on the way to school is more designated walking and cycling routes.

Gary Rae, director of communications and campaigns, said: “Brake’s Giant Walk is a great way for schools to highlight the need for safer roads in their communities to enable children to be able to walk or cycle to school without fear or threat from traffic. Every year as part of this fantastic event, schools use resources and support from Brake to run lessons across a variety of subjects around the theme of road safety and active travel.

“Brake’s Giant Walk is a terrific opportunity to educate children about the importance of road safety and what advantages there are in walking to school for their own health and the environment. It is also a call on local drivers to make a big difference by slowing down to protect children on foot and bike. We’re urging schools to sign up now to take full advantage of the resources and support Brake offers to help schools get involved.”

Natalie Shale, Head of Communications at Ageas, said: “Ageas is delighted to be partnering Brake as part of our continued commitment to road safety. The Giant Walk is a fantastic initiative benefiting young children and communities, and helps us to further increase awareness of the importance of road safety to people's lives.”

[ENDS] 

Notes to Editors:

For more information from Brake call:

Campaigns team: (01484) 55 00 63 / or email news@brake.org.uk

The average number of walking trips per person has decreased by 27% since 1995 in Britain, and less than a quarter (22%) of journeys and just 3% of miles travelled in Britain are now on foot[vii].

Similarly, cycling still only accounts for a very small proportion of journeys in Britain, and road safety is a major factor in putting many people off. Just 2% of journeys and 1% of miles travelled are made by bike[viii]

Full national survey results

Q.1 Have you ever felt scared by traffic when walking or cycling in your neighbourhood?

YES: 38%

NO:   62%

Q.2 Do you think the route between your home and school should be made safer for kids to walk or cycle?

YES: 65%

NO:   35%

Q.3 Would you like there to be more paths, cycle paths and crossings in your neighbourhood that you could use to walk or cycle to the park, shops, to see friends or get to school?

YES: 67%

NO:   33%

Q.4 Do you think more children would walk or cycle to school if roads were safer?

YES: 72%

NO:   28%

Q.5 What more should be done to keep kids safe on the way to school?

More 20mph areas                                                                                  26%

More designated cycle lanes and improved conditions for walking       58%  

They should always be taken by car                                                      2%

Nothing needs to be done                                                                     14%     

 

About Brake’s Giant Walk

Brake’s Giant Walk is an annual event in primary schools where children learn about traffic pollution and danger, and transport choices. Schools taking part get their pupils to walk (in a crocodile of supervised kids, holding hands on safe pavements, or around the school’s grounds), which gives children a voice, helping them tell drivers to slow down and look out for people on foot. Children can be sponsored to take part and schools can run fundraising events, helping fund Brake's campaigns and services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes. This year's Giant Walk takes place on Wednesday 15 June. 

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

About Ageas

Ageas is an award-winning Personal and Commercial insurance provider in the UK, employing over 5,500 people with offices based across the UK. For more information about Ageas please visit ageas.co.uk.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Speech by Brake trustee Deborah Johnson to Brake's parliamentary reception, 19.01.10

Tonight I want to talk about need. The word has to be one of the most inappropriately used in the English language when it comes to cars. People say they need their cars for work, for shopping, for holidays, to get to schools. Yet the meeting can be by phone. The shopping can be delivered. We can get to our holiday by train. We can choose to walk our children to school.

Instead of making right choices, we destroy lives, the planet, and make communities miserable with polluting, speeding traffic. Our children are obese. We see driving as a right and the default mode of transport.

10 children are killed or seriously injured on foot and bikes every day.

This is the one statistic I want you to remember tonight, to help urge you to take part in Road Safety Week 2010 this November, the theme of which is Kids Say Slow Down. Get planning now.

Real needs remain unmet.

Take the need for road crash victims to have immediate practical and emotional support from a trained support worker.

Time and again Brake has watched with increasing scepticism while our government issues announcements about more funding for victims of crime, funded through speeding fines.

Yet not a penny extra is given to road crash victims, and the tiny amount Brake gets, which enables us to just fund the production and distribution of support guides for bereaved adults, has been cut back and we are awaiting news whether it will be raised again.

It remains deeply unjust that you can have your house burgled and get face to face support, but your family wiped out by a drink driver and get only the Brake support pack.

Then there’s the need to rid our roads of drink drivers who cause 1 in 6 road deaths and drug drivers who are thought to cause a similar number; the theme of Road Safety Week last year. While other countries have trace-only drink drive limits, electronic roadside drug drive testing, and enforcement so comprehensive they can check 1 in 2 drivers every year, Britain remains in the stone age. We check under 2% of drivers and offenders know it and risk it. We are only now considering reducing our drink drive limit from a shamefully high limit, only just considering making drug driving illegal, and still haven’t approved drug testing devices.

And then there’s the need to protect young drivers who are so much more likely to cause death and injury, often their own. While other countries introduced restrictions on young drivers years ago, our government has been consulting but is yet to decide.

And then there’s the need to stop speeding. We have the satellite technology to limit vehicle speed in different zones. Yet so many roads are still without even speed cameras or a 20mph zone. Why, when there is so much evidence that the faster we drive, the more people we kill? The answer is lack of national urgency, combined with political cogitation. It can’t be the money – funds spent on road safety are more than recouped in savings to the NHS.

Who knows what the future will hold with imminent elections. Wherever the power base lies, humanitarianism must win over crazy libertarianism that puts motorist freedoms above someone’s right to live.

So the message to politicians and civil servants tonight is - thank you for the words and the thinking and the planning; now let’s see the action, confirmed in a strong 10 year strategy. Or in simpler terms, put your money where your mouth is.

The actions of many of you in the room tonight over the past year must be commended.

The companies who have supported Brake’s work with donations, sponsorship and actions to reduce road risk in your fleets. The volunteers, schools, universities and nurseries who have worked so hard campaigning for road safety locally and fundraising for Brake. The politicians in ministerial and back bench roles and civil servants who are progressing the measures we are so urgently calling for. The emergency services supporting road crash victims and local government employees promoting road safety.

And all of you who support Brake year in, year out, giving us stability in difficult times. People like Toby, our volunteer of the year last year, who this year is planning an amazing trip across Costa Rica with 7 mates to raise funds for Brake. There are so many other awe-inspiring examples. Which brings me on to our volunteer of the year this year.

Dominic was just 18 when he was killed by his friend, a drink and drug driver. His mum Nova Storey has kept his name alive in the best possible way through her volunteering with Brake. There seems to be nothing that Nova won’t do. She runs our 2young2die workshops for young people about the dangers of driving, gives TV interviews, helps train police officers about the needs of bereaved families, and even done a hair-raising zip slide for the charity. The list could go on.

I invite Nova to come and accept her award, and I urge you to show your appreciation.

I am also pleased to announce the winner of our 2young2die competition, which invites young people to campaign for road safety. Ana Santos from the University of Leeds created a hard-hitting advert warning of the dangers of driving while on a phone which she got shown in a local cinema.

I invite Ana to accept her award, and can you show your appreciation.

I am now pleased to welcome to the stage Steve Treloar from Direct Line and Paul Clark, Road Safety Minister, who will present our Parliamentarian of the Year Award.

UK headed for gridlock as new record car use revealed

19 May 21016
 
 
Brake is concerned by worrying new figures showing car traffic reached a new peak in 2015. This means that overall traffic has increased by almost 19% since 1995.
 
The number of vehicle miles travelled grew by 1.1% in 2015, to 247.7 billion. This is a new record, being slightly higher than the previous peak in 2007.[i]
 
Van traffic has continued to grow more quickly than any other vehicle type, rising 4.2% from 2014 levels.[ii]Lorry traffic saw the largest year-on-year increase since the 1980s, growing by 3.7% from 2014.[iii]
 
Motorway use has now increased by 10 percent in the last ten years and in 2015 saw 66.5 billion vehicle miles of traffic, 2.6% more than in 2014[iv].
 
The use of rural roads went up by 2% from 2014, and traffic on both ‘A’ roads and minor roads reached record levels.[v]
 
There has been a worrying long-term decrease in the number of miles buses are now covering. From 2014 to 2015 there was a drop of 4.6% in bus and coach travel. This is perhaps not surprising; there has been a decrease of 21% in local authority supported bus services outside London in the last decade. A lack of public transport in some areas means many people are left with no other option than to use private vehicles.
 
Disappointingly, despite the recent increase in cycling, the amount of miles cycled in 2015, 3.2 billion, was down 6.1% on the year before. That’s after a steady increase between 2002 and 2014. Taking a longer view, cyclists in 2015 travelled only around one quarter of the 14.7 billion miles ridden in 1949.
 
Increases in traffic on the road network mean a greater number of interactions of vehicles and pedestrians and, therefore, increases the likelihood of crashes occurring. Per mile travelled, the risk of being killed or seriously injured in a road crash has fallen almost every year since 1949 but there was a slight increase in 2014.
 
Campaigns adviser for Brake, the road safety charity Alice Bailey said: “These new figures show our message of “drive less live more” is more pertinent than ever. We have record car usage in the UK along with all the congestion and pollution this brings. More traffic means more risks to vulnerable road users and danger to the health of both individuals and the planet. To see a reduction in levels of vehicle use, we need everyone to seriously consider if they really need to make that journey by car and always walk, cycle or use public transport if they can.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to Editors:
 
About Brake
 
Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Zak the Zebra gallops into Yaxham to support 20mph limits to keep kids safe

Friday 9 May 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Zak the Zebra, mascot of road safety charity Brake, has galloped into Yaxham, Norfolk. Thanks to sponsorship from Royal HaskoningDHV, Zak is supporting a community campaign for 20mph speed limits by Yaxham Primary School.

Despite the introduction of zig-zag road markings four years ago, campaigners are concerned that pupils are being put in danger by fast traffic outside the school, which is positioned on a bend, as well as by dangerous and inconsiderate parking. A survey in 2013 for the Yaxham Community Led Plan, chaired by Peter Smith, confirmed that 90% of households believe traffic speeds in the village are a major problem, with the 30mph Norwich Road outside the school the most frequently mentioned cause of concern.

In February 2014, concerned parents formed a '20's plenty' action group, together with headteacher Cor Dekker, to call for a 20mph speed limit. The campaign now has the backing of the local parish council, parent-teacher association, and local MP George Freeman, who are all united in their goal.

Norfolk country council has since placed Yaxham Primary on a list of schools to have part-time 20mph limits around opening and closing times, but this is yet to be implemented as the school is not considered a funding priority.

According to campaigners there have been at least two near misses outside the school recently, and campaigners are adamant that a 20mph speed limit needs to be put in place before someone is killed or injured.

Parents, staff and pupils will be gathering to launch the campaign at the school on 9 May, together with George Freeman MP, who will be judging the children's '20's plenty' road sign competition, and local police officers, who will be doing checks and giving road safety advice. Brake's mascot, Zak the Zebra, will also be there to meet parents and pupils and show his support.

Brake campaigns nationally for town, village and city-wide 20mph limits, to protect people where they live, work, learn or play. To find out more about the GO 20 campaign for safe, active, happy communities, and how you can get involved, visit www.brake.org.uk/go20.

Ed Morrow, campaigns officer, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Everyone – adults and children – should be able to walk and cycle in their communities, to get to school or work, or for their health and enjoyment, without being put in danger by fast traffic. We have a duty to our children to create a safe environment for them to live and learn, and to enjoy the places where they live. That's what Brake's GO 20 campaign is all about: putting people's safety first, and empowering us all to enjoy healthy, active lifestyles. Brake is committed to supporting campaigners across the country who, as in Yaxham, are passionate about making their communities safer and more pleasant places to live. We hope Zak's visit will encourage the authorities to listen to the community's concerns and take action by putting in a 20 limit: we firmly believe it's the most appropriate speed limit in our towns and villages."

Racheal Higgins, school governor and chair of Yaxham 20's plenty action group, said: "We are grateful for the support and hard work of everyone involved with the 20's plenty action group, who have formed a fabulous, caring team. We will not wait for a crash or fatality to achieve our goal of 20mph limits; our children's lives and wellbeing are our utmost priority."

Stephen Bibb, principal transport planner, Royal HaskoningDHV, said: "We are proud to support Brake in their community campaigns for safer roads. We believe that road safety should be proactive and these campaigns are not only important in educating communities but they also support local authorities in helping to prevent needless deaths and injuries on our roads, which devastate too many lives. By supporting Brake's Zak the Zebra campaign, we hope we can help people campaigning on the front line to make our roads safer, more inclusive and sustainable environments for everyone."

Notes for editors

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, a Fleet Safety Forum, practitioner services, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Zak the Zebra
To receive support and advice from Brake and Zak the Zebra on campaigning for safer roads locally, community members can report their road safety concerns or campaigns at www.zakthezebra.org. Alternatively, they can call Zak's hotline number, 08000 687 780. The hotline is sponsored by Irwin Mitchell Solicitors, corporate partners of Brake.

Regional Managing Partner at Irwin Mitchell Solicitors, Grahame Codd, said: "As personal injury solicitors we are well aware of how road crashes can devastate lives. We are providing the Zak the Zebra hotline to hopefully reduce the shocking number of child casualties on our roads."

Royal HaskoningDHV
Royal HaskoningDHV is an independent, international engineering and project management consultancy with more than 130 years of experience. Providing services in aviation, buildings, energy, industry, infrastructure, maritime, mining, rural areas, urban areas and water all over the world. By showing leadership in sustainable development and innovation, together with our clients, we are working to become part of the solution to a more sustainable society now and into the future.