Articles Tagged ‘training - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake and Morrison Utility Services

Brake have supported Morrison Utility Services across a number of their contracts, adding content and expertise to their driver training sessions. 

After being involved with a number Road Safety Week campaigns, Morrison Utility Services came on board as partners in 2014 with the ambition of incorporating road risk into their health and safety remit. Morrison Utility Services asked Brake to add support to their autumn/winter campaign and talk directly to drivers and office staff across 6 different sites. Brake delivered a presentation on the risks associated with drink and drug driving and also provided guidance reports on winter driving and driver tiredness. These workshops were eventually delivered to members of the Morrison board of directors and senior health and safety executives. 

Cycling to School

cycle4life_6Cycling to school can be a fun, healthy way for secondary school children to start the day. With training, and safe conditions, most secondary school children are capable of cycling independently. (Younger children shouldn’t cycle on their own unless there are off-road cycle facilities as their motor skills are still developing.) However, all too often heavy or fast moving traffic, lack of cycling facilities, narrow roads, or, in some rural areas, very hilly terrain, makes cycling to school unsafe or difficult. Ironically, up to one in five cars on the road at rush hour is on the school run.

In recognition of these issues, the government requires schools to draw up School Travel Plans with the help of their local authority in a bid to reduce traffic around schools. This includes identifying and working to address any barriers to children walking or cycling in safety, including lack of cycling facilities such as cycle paths. Some problems may be addressed easily, such as a need for children to be trained to cycle safely. Others may take longer or be more costly or even take years of campaigning for, such as a cycle paths. This depends on the authority in which you live and a range of issues such as practicalities of engineering works and available funds.

To find out what’s happening in your area, ask to see the School Travel Plan and ask about its progression. If you don’t think enough is happening, go to Cycle for life’s campaign page (listed below).

Useful links:
Bikeability the National Cycle Training standard and training programme run in schools
Bike It, a project run by the charity Sustrans, encouraging schools to increase numbers of children cycling safely to school.
Child Road Safety Strategy from the Department for Transport, including child cycling information.
Cycle for life’s campaign page
Cycle for life’s cycle training page
Department for Transport advice on School Travel Plans and cycling
Department for Transport guide for school travel plans for parents, teachers and governors
School Travel Plan.org includes basic information on getting started on a School Travel Plan - talk to your local authority for more details.
Sustrans Safe Routes to School Case Studies


Cycling around your community >>

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Cycling with kids

cycle4life_13Kids love bikes - and cycling with them is a great way to stay fit and enjoy some quality family time together while helping teach them important safe cycling lessons. As well as cycling with younger children, children aged 10 or older who have passed their on-road cycle training will also benefit from cycling with you as a family. They are still inexperienced and less able to anticipate dangers on their own. Think carefully before giving permission to older children to cycle on roads on their own - this will depend on the safety of cycling routes around your home.

Cycling away from roads with your family

Safe places to cycle and have stress-free fun as a family include off-road cycle trails, parks and many forests and country parks with specially created mountain biking areas. Many have cycle hire facilities. In cities, velodromes often have indoor and outdoor facilities that are open to children of a certain age - check them out on the web.

Getting to the start of your ride

If you cannot cycle safely from your door, you may choose to buy or hire a bike carrier for your car. This means you can take your bikes anywhere but it has a serious downside of not being environmentally friendly. The better option is to use public transport, carrying your bikes with you or hiring them when you get there. This takes more organisation and might not be possible in all cases. However, it can be worth the effort and give you more quality time with your family - children love buses and trains.

Useful links:
Forestry Commission lists of cycle trails and facilities
Road Cycling UK lists of Velodromes
Sustrans lists of cycle hire facilities
Cycle for life pages on travelling by bike and public transport


Carrying pre-schoolers >>

<< Family cycling home page

<< Cycle4life home page

 

 

Fleet and road safety events and training

 
Brake runs a programme of conferences, seminars and webinars, and training courses for fleet safety professionals throughout the year, as well as offering in-house training packages.


Visit our calendar of events for an overview of all of our upcoming events, or read on to find out more about some of our flagship events and training options.

Fleet Safety Conference
Brake’s Fleet Safety Conference is an annual event bringing together fleet managers and suppliers to share best practice in managing road risk.

Fleet Safety Awards
Brake’s Fleet Safety Awards is an annual, free to enter awards scheme recognising the achievements of operators and suppliers working to reduce the number of crashes involving at-work drivers.

Seminars and webinars
Our annual programme of seminars and webinars covers a range of road safety topics and issues around managing at-work road risk. Seminars are run throughout the UK, and webinars are run online to enable easy, eco-friendly attendance.

Pledge training
The Brake Pledge is a simple and flexible driver safety campaign for employers to use with their drivers. The Pledge can be adapted to any size or type of fleet, and any budget. Through Pledge training employers can raise drivers' awareness on key road safety topics. Employers can attend one of a number of training sessions throughout the UK, or book an in-house Pledge training course.


Visit our preference centre to sign up for email updates for professionals, or join us on Linked In or follow us on Twitter.

John Leech, MP for Manchester Withington, December 2007

dec07John Leech, MP for Manchester Withington
John Leech MP has been stepping up his campaign to save young lives, by lobbying for a default 20mph speed limit on urban roads and roadside pedestrian training for children.

In December, John kept the momentum of his campaign going by tabling numerous Parliamentary Questions. He is trying to establish if the impact of 20mph zones throughout the UK has been monitored and assessed fully, particularly in cities like Hull and Edinburgh, where there are a significant number of 20mph zones. Any evidence of casualty reductions achieved in these areas will further strengthen his campaign and back up his calls to Government. He is also trying to ascertain if those local authorities who have good speed management practices in place, and have achieved casualty reductions, ever share their best practice with other local authorities, and if the Department for Transport does anything to encourage or facilitate this. John is also probing the Government to explain why roadside pedestrian training is not available throughout the whole of the UK, in every school.

John intends to continue campaigning into the New Year, and is working with Brake and other MPs to make the case for a 20mph default urban limit directly to the road safety minister, Jim Fitzpatrick. John hopes that the Government will adopt a version of the legislation outlined in his 2007 Ten Minute Rule Bill to set a default 20mph urban limit. The Bill was lost due to timetabling.

For more information, read about Brake’s ‘Watch out there’s a kid about’ campaign to stop child death and injury on the road. Why not join the campaign? - [sign Brake’s petition][2] calling for ring-fenced funding for 20mph zones around schools and homes. If you know of a dangerous road in your area, let Brake know by calling our Zak the zebra hotline on 08000 68 77 80, and Brake could help you campaign for road safety improvements. 

[2]: /community/watch out theres a kid about/funding for 20mph zones

Organising practical roadside road safety training for pupils with SEN

Effective, safely-delivered roadside training can be very labour intensive and take many hours, particularly if catering to the varying needs of different pupils. However, it is also extremely worthwhile, and the most effective method for teaching safe walking and cycling skills to children.Practical training has been shown to be particularly effective for children with learning difficulties and disabilities, helping them to relate road safety rules and skills to a real-life context, and encouraging them to take responsibility for their own safety.[1]

For pupils with average learning development, roadside pedestrian training should be provided to pupils age 5-11, while pupils age 10 and over can be offered practical cycle training. However, if you teach pupils age 11-18 with SEN, you should also consider whether these pupils could benefit from pedestrian training to help them grasp and practise the skills involved in staying safe on foot.

PEDESTRIAN TRAINING

Contact your local road safety officer
Before organising roadside training, it is essential to contact your local road safety officer for advice and assistance to ensure training is carried out safely.

Carefully plan safe trainingYou will need to talk through the needs of your pupils with your road safety officer, and work with them to carefully plan training so it is delivered in a way that is inclusive, relevant for all pupils, and safe for all pupils to attend. You should also consult with parents and carers (as below) and your local authority's SEN specialist.

It is imperative to ensure that no pupils are put at risk through training, so discuss with the road safety officer how many trained adult supervisors will be needed. You should particularly take into account pupils who may be harder to control and supervise on and near roads (see page on risks faced by pupils with SEN).

For children of average learning development age 5-7 you need at least one supervisor for every two children (so every child has an adult's hand to hold). For children of average learning development age 7-11 you need at least one supervisor for every six children. However, you may decide that to take some children with SEN out, it is safest (and most effective) to work with very small groups, with one adult supervisor per child.

Be aware that, for some pupils with SEN, intensive training over a long period of time may be required to bring them to a standard where they consistently apply safety rules.[2]

It is also important to ensure that a safe road environment is used for the training, such as a very quiet road, with pavements and crossings. You road safety officer will be able to offer advice on where training should be held, and carry out a safety audit. You can also download a safety audit designed to help schools decide whether roads are safe enough to take children on supervised walks.

Training content

For guidance on the key skills that effective training should cover for different age pupils of normal learning development, click here. Depending on the needs and abilities of pupils, you may decide with your road safety officer that training for a lower age group is most appropriate (or a better place to start) than training that would typically be provided to pupils of that age.

It can be useful to practise basic safety skills in the playground first, particularly if pupils have limited experience of using roads. For example, you can teach children to respond to important words like 'stop' and practise the Green Cross Code by standing on lines in the playground or by marking out a road with chalk. Get children to use 'self-instruction' both in this environment and at the roadside, where they recite safe actions before carrying them out, e.g. 'stop near the edge of the kerb, look left then right.' This has been shown by research to be effective with children with SEN.[3]

Involve parents and carers
Training should aim to build on children's existing knowledge and should aim to develop skills through discussion and practice.[4] Ideally, training should be reinforced by parents and carers who supervise children outside of school time, so it's important to communicate the key messages of training to parents and carers. This is particularly important for pupils who still need adult supervision when using roads.

Many pupils will start to walk and cycle independently aged 8-11, but pupils with SEN may still require adult supervision during and beyond this age range. Consult with parents to find out whether pupils with SEN are starting to use roads independently and, if so, what they perceive the main risks to be. Once training has taken place, encourage parents and carers to provide opportunities for pupils to put their skills into practice, such as by regularly taking pupils on short, supervised walks and talking through key safety rules as they do so.

You may also be able to involve parents and carers in the training as supervisors, as long as they receive appropriate training and guidance, which you can discuss with your road safety officer. Research suggests that training for children with learning difficulties that involves parents and carers can be more effective.[5]

Back up training with classroom learning. It's also important to back up practical training with classroom learning, using discussion, diagrams and models. Use our lesson ideas for 5-11 year-olds for inspiration and go back to the page on teaching road safety to children with SEN for guidance.

Follow-up after training It's important to bear in mind, and communicate to parents and carers, the limitations of training and any ongoing problems individual pupils experienced during training. For example, some pupils may master the Green Cross Code in some situations, but have problems transferring the skill to different road environments. Other pupils might have had ongoing problems staying focused on what is being taught.

It is also impossible for courses to cover all eventualities and dangers on the roads, however detailed the course. Children, parents and carers should not be lulled into a false sense of security that they have been taught the rules and will therefore be able to always look after themselves. Some children may need ongoing adult supervision when using roads, even if they have received training. You should ensure that pupils? performance in training is fed back to parents and carers so they can make informed decisions about whether a child is ready to start using roads independently.

Some children may continue to be at extra risk due to their learning disability, or due to a tendency to be influenced by pressures to act dangerously. Ideally, you should continue to develop pupils' understanding of risks on the road and how to keep themselves safe by regular lessons, which can refer back to the practical training.

Work towards safer routes to school As well as providing practical training and classroom-based learning to help pupils walk and cycle safely, you should also work towards achieving a safer road environment for pupils in your community, particularly on routes between your school and pupils? homes. You can find advice on doing this here.

CYCLE TRAINING

In 2007, the Government launched Bikeability, a new training programme being rolled out across England which replaces the old ‘cycling proficiency’, and which can be taken by both children and adults. To get their Bikeability award, pupils are instructed on how to ride their bikes to the Government-approved 'National Standard for Cycle Training'. Bikeability is delivered by accredited instructors, usually employed by local authorities.

According to Cycling England, which administers the scheme, most children with SEN will be able to make use of the training, although you should consult with both your local authority road safety officer and pupils' parents and carers to assess the risks and ensure training can be undertaken safely. Level 1 of Bikeability is taken off-road, so can be a great introduction to basic cycling skills as there is no risk from traffic. It is also important to ensure that pupils and parents do not regard the training as a guarantee that children will be competent enough to cycle unaccompanied, when they may not have the skills, abilities or experience to allow them to do so safely.

Bikeability involves three levels of training and assessment:

  • Level 1 takes place off-road (e.g. on a playground) and involves a 1-2 hour session with no more than 15 pupils per instructor. It is suitable for pupils of normal learning development aged 8 and upwards. Level 2 takes place on quiet roads and aims to enable pupils to cycle safely to school or local amenities using quiet local roads. It consists of five sessions, with at least two instructors for a group of no more than 12 pupils. The first session should last two hours and include a cycle check and assessment of Level 1 skills in the playground. The next four one-hour sessions take place at local road junctions. Level two can only be undertaken by pupils who have completed level one and is not recommended for pupils of normal learning development under the age of 10. Level 3 takes places on busier roads and aims to equip pupils with the skills to be able to cycle on busy roads using complex junctions. It can only be undertaken by pupils who have completed level 2 and is not recommended for children of normal learning development under the age of 14.

Bikeability modules are currently being developed that are specifically aimed at children with SEN who need additional, tailored training. These are expected to be ready by late 2007 ' check www.bikeability.org.uk or ask your local authority to let you know when these are available.

For more information go to www.bikeability.org.uk. To find out if Bikeability is offered in your area, contact your local road safety officer.

Bikeability is an England-wide scheme, but schools in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland can contact their local road safety officer to find out if similar 'National Standard' cycle training is offered locally, or click through here to online information on cycle training in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland.

For advice on promoting cycling to pupils, go to our web page on School Travel Plans.

Back to menu - Teaching road safety to children with SEN


[1] The Road Safety of Children and Adults with Disabilities (Transport Research Laboratory, 2002)

[2] The Road Safety of Children and Adults with Disabilities (Transport Research Laboratory, 2002)

[3] The Road Safety of Children and Adults with Disabilities (Transport Research Laboratory, 2002)

[4] Step Forward guidelines, www.dft.gov.uk (Department for Transport)

[5] *Phillips, S and J Todman. *Pedestrian skills training for children with learning difficulties.

International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 1999, 22, 237-238.

Disclaimer: Brake is not responsible for the content of external websites

Pedestrian and cycle training

Effective pedestrian and cyclist training can be labour intensive and take many hours to deliver. However, it is also extremely worthwhile, and the most effective way to teach safe walking and cycling skills to children.

Training should aim to build on children’s existing knowledge and develop their skills through discussion and practice. Training should be reinforced by parents effectively supervising and communicating with their children outside of school time too. This is particularly important for under-8s, who should only walk and cycle with adult supervision. You should also be able to involve parents and carers in the training as supervisors with the appropriate training and guidance.

It’s also important to back up practical training with classroom learning, using discussion, diagrams and models. Use our teaching guide for inspiration.

And finally, practical training should never be seen as the solution to dangerous roads. If your roads are too dangerous for children to practise their walking or cycling skills on or near, then you need to campaign for a safer road environment.

Safety first

  • To organise safe training, you should first find out if it is offered by your local council. Your local council may run established, evaluated training courses on walking safely or cycling safely. They will also be able to advise on whether or not you have a safe enough road environment on which to carry out your training.
  • All young children must hold an adult's hand and be given personal tuition in small groups. Advice on the number of supervisors you need to be safe for different age groups is given below. It is also best practice to ensure that at least two adult supervisors are present together at any one time, so that no one adult is left alone to supervise children.
  • With reasonable warning, parents may be able to help, but you must ensure they have appropriate guidance and training.
  • It can be useful to practise some road safety skills in the playground first, either using lines on the playground to denote kerbs, or marking out a road with crossings in chalk, for children to practise on.

Roadside pedestrian training for pre-schoolers

For this age group, it is safest to teach the children basic safety language and safety skills using role-play and other activities on your premises, rather than taking children out and teaching at the roadside. To teach children on your premises, you can draw out a road map on your playground and use ride-on toys and other props.

Your council might offer road safety training for parents of young children, and can also offer advice on educating young children.

Many early years educators do take children out on foot, for example, to visit a local park. You should only ever take children off your premises on foot if you have at least one supervisor for every two children so every child has a hand to hold. Very young children who are walking should wear reins as well as holding hands with an adult. It’s also crucial to assess the safety of the route you will take and ensure it has safe pavements and crossings on quiet roads.

You should conduct a safey audit to help you assess routes you use, although you should also consult your local authority if you have any doubts about the safety of your routes.

If you do take children out on foot, use it as an opportunity to teach and reinforce simple safety rules like: always hold hand with an adult; always stay on pavements away from traffic; stop when an adult says stop.

Roadside pedestrian training for 5-6 year olds

At this age children can be encouraged to start to make choices according to what’s safe and what’s dangerous (such as choosing a safe place to cross), but still under close supervision while holding hands with a responsible adult. With this age group, when running training you should have at least one supervisor for every two children, so every child has a hand to hold.

Contact your local authority road safety officer to find out if they can run a training course for you, with the assistance of teachers and volunteer parents.

During roadside training, children in this age bracket can:

  • Practise holding hands and walking safely on the pavement away from the kerb;
  • Practise stopping well away from the kerb, when a pavement ends (for example at a side junction);
  • Practise looking and listening for traffic. What things stop you seeing traffic? For example, a bend, a tree, parked cars, the hood of your coat. Where might traffic come from? For example, both directions, and out of drives and side turnings;
  • Practise crossing the road at the safest places, for example at a pelican crossing or a zebra crossing. Explain why these are safer;
  • Visit a park or playground and discuss why it is safe to have fun there. For example, there is no traffic and there is a fence around it.

You should conduct a safey audit to help you assess if a road near your school, and the access route to it, is safe for child pedestrian training, although you should also consult your local authority.

Roadside pedestrian training for 7-11 year olds

Children in this age bracket are usually ready to practice the Green Cross Code, having already learnt the Code and other basic safety rules in the classroom. For this age group, you need at least one trained adult supervisor for every six children, with no less than two supervisors present at any one time. The training should take into account that children in this age group may be starting to walk independently, and may start to experience peer pressure to act dangerously, particularly when they move up to secondary school. Training for this age group should therefore have an emphasis on making safe choices despite pressures to do otherwise.

Contact your local authority road safety officer to find out if they can run a training course for you, with the assistance of teachers and volunteer parents.

The training should:
Always take place on a quiet road, ideally with a crossing and lollipop person, and in small groups with plenty of trained supervisors.

Use self-instruction, where children recite safety rules before enacting them, e.g. stop near the edge of the kerb, look left, look right, etc.

Include discussion on the safest places to cross (e.g. on pelican crossings), and the most dangerous places where you shouldn’t cross (e.g. between parked cars, at busy junctions, or in front of a bus).

Include discussion on safety features on roads, such as speed limit signs, zig-zag road markings near school gates, railings and road humps. Why are they there and what do they mean? Who are they trying to protect?

Include discussion on why you shouldn’t trust traffic. Some drivers take risks like speeding, so it’s impossible to judge how fast traffic is and how long it will take to reach you. Never take chances and only cross when nothing’s coming.

Practical cyclist training for children aged eight or older

You may or may not want to investigate on-road cycle training, depending on the hazards on roads in your community. Some communities roads are, in many people’s view including in Brake’s view, just too dangerous to encourage children to cycle on them, and not designed with heavy traffic flows and child cyclists in mind.

However, the advice below will be of use to you if you have quiet roads with good separation of traffic and cyclists, for example through well-designed, separate cycle paths.

In 2007, the Government launched Bikeability, a new training programme being rolled out across England which replaces the old ‘cycling proficiency’, and which can be taken by both children and adults. To get their Bikeability award, pupils are instructed on how to ride their bikes to the Government-approved National Standard for Cycle Training. Bikeability is delivered by accredited instructors, usually employed by local authorities. It involves three levels of training and assessment:

  • Level 1 takes place off-road (e.g. on a playground) and involves a 1-2 hour session with no more than 15 pupils per instructor. It is suitable for pupils aged 8 and upwards.
  • Level 2 takes place on quiet roads and aims to enable pupils to cycle safely to school or local amenities using quiet local roads. It consists of five sessions, with at least two instructors for a group of no more than 12 pupils. The first session should last two hours and include a cycle check and assessment of Level 1 skills in the playground. The next four one-hour sessions take place at local road junctions. Level two can only be undertaken by pupils who have completed level one and is not recommended for pupils under the age of 10.
  • Level 3 takes places on busier roads and aims to equip pupils with the skills to be able to cycle on busy roads using complex junctions. It can only be undertaken by pupils who have completed level 2 and is not recommended for children under the age of 14.

For more information go to www.bikeability.org.uk. To find out if Bikeability is offered in your area, contact your local road safety officer.

Bikeability is an England-wide scheme, but schools in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland can contact their local road safety officer to find out if similar National Standard cycle training is offered locally, or use these links for information on cycle training in Scotland and Wales.

If you are offering cycling training and your roads are appropriate for child cyclists, then you may want to encourage cycling to school as part of your School Travel Plan. Some local authorities have a dedicated Bike It officer to help schools promote cycling. Even if you choose not to encourage cycling to and from school and in your community because you, parents or your local authority know the risks are too great, it may still be a good idea to offer some level of cycle training - children may still choose to cycle around their homes, on off-road cycle paths, or on their holidays, and many children will have a bike.

Prepare yourself - cycle training

Cycle training is valuable whatever your age; it’s not just something for kids. It can help you to improve your cycling skills and save your neck. There are cycle trainers across the UK, many specialising in offering training to children, often through schools, and many also offering training for adults. Links to these are at the bottom of this page. Make sure a cycle trainer you use is accredited and following the national standards (see useful links below).

Many schools run free courses for children aged 10 and above, funded by the local authority. If your school doesn’t offer it, talk to your local authority road safety unit and find out if it is possible. If not, campaign for this training to be provided - particularly if you have safe, under-used routes for cyclists in your area. As well as practical training, it helps to read up on how to ride safely. There are many resources offering detailed information on topics ranging from bike maintenance to the dangers of cycling near lorries. See below links for further reading.

Useful links:
Bikeability lists instructors in your area, promotes cycle training for kids and gives advice to parents
CTC lists private accredited instructors
The National Standards in Cycle Training - ask your bike trainer if they comply

Further reading:
Cycle craft is a useful book including a wealth of advice on riding safely and maintaining your bike.
The Highway Code (online version) is essential reading if you cycle on roads.
Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents on line cycling fact sheets include important advice on the dangers of cycling near lorries.


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Safe Urban Driving Course - Travis Perkins & Fleetsource

Travis Perkins has approximately 1,650 drivers working across Greater London – an area densely populated with cyclists, pedestrians and heavy goods vehicles (HGV’s).With that in mind I travelled to Barking to participate in the safe urban driving course at the new Fleet Source building in Fresh Wharf Estate.

The safe urban driving course is accredited by both Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS) and Transport for London (TfL) and has been heavily invested in by Travis Perkins – to date they have provided £750,000 pounds to run it.

I arrived in East London as both a charity partner and Brake representative, but also a participant, alongside a selection of Travis Perkins drivers throughout the day. I would be experiencing the same educational course that all Travis Perkins drivers have to go through and my mind was open to what I could take away from the event myself.

Both classroom and bicycle based, this course aims to give drivers a different perspective of the road, particularly focusing on vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists. The aim of the course is very apparent; to create a safer generation of lorry drivers who are more conscious of the other, less visible road users, in cities where cycling is becoming the favoured method of transport and cyclists are ever increasing in numbers.

It was very educational to be able to sit in the lorry cab and have a driver talk me through all of the safety features that have been installed within the vehicle including extra blind spot mirrors, turning signals and larger windows covering the passenger door for increased visibility. Whilst on the bikes it was equally informative in terms of addressing situations of potential driver/cyclist conflict including junctions, traffic lights and advanced stop lines and also recognising best driving practice around cyclists.

The fundamental thing I took from this event was the importance of understanding both sides of the coin.  On a personal note, I really never knew about the lack of visibility that lorry drivers had of vulnerable road users nor the safety features in place to protect vulnerable road users. As a cyclist it’s easy to think that a driver can see you all the time in their mirrors when in reality that’s not the case.

On the flip side, it is vitally important for lorry drivers to complete this course. By doing so they learn the perspective of a vulnerable road user and it helps them understand the situation of all people who use our roads. 

Therapists and counsellors

theclaimsconnection is pleased to sponsor this page. Visit our site>

redroseIf you specialise in supporting people who have been suddenly and violently bereaved, then Brake would like to work with you.

Brake believes that victims of sudden and violent death deserve immediate support to help them through the initial shock period, and that many of these victims need on-going support in the form of expert talk-based therapy if their shock symptoms have not subsided after a couple of months.

Find out about training we are running on supporting suddenly bereaved people, and join Brake's Sudden Death Forum, helping you provide the best possible support to people who have been traumatically bereaved.

Could you, within your professional remit, provide some time free of charge to help someone recently bereaved by road death in your community? We are seeking people who can provide supportive house visits to recently bereaved road death victims. We are not asking you to provide therapy or counselling; rather strong empathetic support during the shock period, to help families cope during their darkest hour.

If you think you could help, call our helpline on 0808 8000 401.

This page is kindly sponsored by:

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You can make a difference! Here's how..

cycle4life_5Are you taking your life in your hands when you get on your bike in your community due to speeding traffic or lack of cycle paths or both?

Campaign for better facilities for cyclists such as cycle paths

Your local authority’s highways department is responsible for roads in your area. This means it is their job to make sure traffic, including cyclists, can move around safely. If you think there is scope to create cycle paths, introduce traffic calming or implement other measures to reduce dangers to cyclists, then your local authority is the first port of call. Brake’s community pages on this website help you liaise effectively with them to achieve results, and gives you tips on campaigning through local politicians and the media if you don’t get the results you need.

Ask for free cycle training in your school

If you have roads that are appropriate for children to cycle on, contact your local authority’s road safety unit or cycling officer to find out if your school is eligible for training. Check out Cycle4Life’s cycle training page to find out more.

Encourage your school to teach road safety and the benefits of walking and cycling and develop their School Travel Plan

Brake provides ready-made resources to help schools teach children about road safety. These include lesson ideas, guidance on developing their School Travel Plan and teacher training. Check out our education section.

Find out more about Brake’s campaigns

Brake actively campaigns through Government at a national and local level and through Parliament, with a focus on driver safety issues, such as reducing driver speed. Visit Brake’s campaigns pages to find out more about our campaign work.

 


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