Practitioners urged to refer injured road crash victims to Brake support guide as new edition released

Thursday 9 October 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Brake, the road safety charity, has released an updated version of its online support guide for people seriously injured in road crashes, thanks to sponsorship from Fentons Solicitors, part of Slater & Gordon. Brake is urging practitioners who work with injured road crash victims to make use of this resource and refer victims to the guide and Brake's helpline.

Brake's serious injury following a road crash guide was originally produced in 2003, for people whose injuries following a road crash make a significant impact on their daily life and their family. It aims to help them deal with the many issues that can emerge, and includes information on financial, practical and emotional help as well as criminal processes if the injury was caused by someone else's driving.

The new edition has been simplified and streamlined to make it more accessible for people going through such a distressing and confusing time. Topics covered in the guide include:

  • hospital treatment, rehabilitation and disabilities
  • claiming compensation
  • the crash and criminal prosecutions
  • coping with emotions and feelings
  • useful organisations.

The guide is available online, and is being signposted via police forces across the UK and the Brake helpline, which offers over-the-phone explanation of information in the guide alongside a range of other professionally-delivered support for seriously injured and bereaved road crash victims.

Brake is a long-running and well-respected provider of high-quality emotional support and practical information to road crash victims across the UK, through services part-funded by government and part-funded by corporate sponsors. Brake's bereavement packs are presented to bereaved families following every road death in the UK. Brake's helpline deals with about 450 cases of death and serious injury each year, supporting people bereaved through crashes across the UK and abroad, serious injury victims and their carers, and practitioners working with these victims.

Explore Brake's support services at www.brake.org.uk/support. Brake's helpline for bereaved and injured road crash victims can be reached on 0845 603 8570. Tweet us: @Brakecharity.

Louise Macrae, support service manager, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "The aftermath of a serious injury on the road is a bewildering time. Attempting to deal with legal proceedings and other practical and financial issues while receiving hospital treatment and coming to terms with potentially life-changing disabilities can be incredibly hard. That's why our serious injury guide is such a vital part of the support services Brake provides, pulling together all the crucial information people need at this difficult time in one place. We encourage FLOs, medical staff and other support professionals to familiarise themselves with the updated guide, so they can aid families in accessing the specialist information and support available."

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.