Suspended sentences for street race drivers who hit 134mph

News from Brake
Monday 24 July, 2017
news@brake.org.uk

A judge has today handed three men suspended prison sentences after they were filmed speeding at 134mph on a dual carriageway in the West Midlands. At Birmingham Crown Court, Amar Paul, Tejinder Bhuee and Zafar Iqbal were disqualified from driving for 12 months and fined. Their six-month prison sentences have been suspended for two years.

Commenting on the news, Jason Wakeford, spokesman for Brake, the road safety charity, said: "It's shocking that these defendants escaped jail time because no one was killed or injured. Today's lenient sentences illustrate clearly how tougher penalties for those who deliberately put people's lives at risk on the roads are well overdue.

"Roads are not racetracks. We welcome the crackdown on the menace of illegal street racing by West Midlands Police and other forces, but there needs to be more overall investment in road traffic policing across the UK to improve road safety."

[ENDS]

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.