Articles Tagged ‘cycling - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake welcomes announcement of more cycle training for children

News from Brake
Friday 7 February 2020
 
The Government has today announced the expansion of its cycle training scheme, Bikeability.
 
The move will see more training places on the scheme made available to children across England giving them the skills they need to cycle safely on the roads.
 
Whilst welcoming the move, road safety charity Brake say that more needs to be done to improve the safety of our roads for people cycling, particularly children who are amongst the most vulnerable road users - in 2018, on average, six children cycling were killed or seriously injured every week.
 
Brake want to see safer default speed limits on rural and urban roads, greater investment in segregated cycle lanes and a justice system which keeps dangerous drivers off the roads. The charity believes that such measures can help improve safety and get more people cycling.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake said:“Extending cycle training for children is a positive move but with six children a week being killed or seriously injured when on their bikes it’s clear that much more must be done to make our streets safer. Every child should be able to cycle or walk safely to school without fear from the threat of traffic and so we need slower, safer speed limits, more investment in walking and cycling infrastructure and laws which mean that drivers who behave dangerously are removed from our roads”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:
  • Government announcement on expansion of Bikeability can be read here.

 

Advice for cyclists

cyclistsgroup

Cycling is a great way to get around. It’s fun, healthy, good for the planet and cheaper than driving. But unfortunately it can be risky. In 2017, 101 cyclists were killed and 3,698 seriously injured in Britain. This is part of the reason why the UK lags behind many other countries for cycling levels: just 2% of journeys and 1% of miles in Britain are travelled by bike.

Brake campaigns for safer streets and routes for active and sustainable travel, including traffic free cycle routes and 20mph limits in communities through our Pace for People campaign to encourage uptake and protect people on bikes. Until we achieve this, the ultimate responsibility for protecting cyclists and pedestrians on our roads lies with drivers, who are operating a fastmoving machine that can cause a lot of damage. But there are steps cyclists can take to help reduce the risks they face. Read our advice for cyclists on taking the safest approach to getting about by bike.

- Why cycle?

- Getting started

- Travelling by bike

- Cycling on the road

- Cycling with children

Why cycle?

It’s healthy

Cycling is an excellent form of exercise. Incorporating physical exercise, such as cycling, into everyday life can be as effective for weight loss as a supervised exercise programme. Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease and obesity, and increases life expectancy. High blood pressure, osteoporosis, diabetes and depression are also less frequent among people who exercise regularly, and cyclists in busy cities report better lung health than most other road users as they may experience pollution levels five times lower than drivers. Cycling to work, school or the shops is a great way to stay fit and in shape and feel good.

Modern bikes are lightweight and affordable (especially compared to running a car). Estimates suggest cycling costs riders around £396 per year, compared with the £3,727 annual cost of driving. They can also be fitted with panniers and baskets that can carry a surprising amount.

While the British weather can sometimes be intimidating to first-time cyclists, what looks like a drizzly and cold day from within a car can be refreshing on two wheels. You don’t have to get hot and sweaty, just ride at your own pace.

It’s environmentally friendly

Our society’s over-reliance on cars has major consequences for the environment and our health. More than a quarter of UK carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions come from road transport. It’s estimated that up to 29,000 deaths each year are a result of inhaling particulates, while nitrogen dioxide emissions are thought to contribute to around 24,000. Noise and fumes from traffic also impact on our ability to enjoy our local communities and countryside, and unless we act now, the amount of traffic on our roads is set to increase. By 2035, the amount of traffic travelling in congested conditions is predicted to double. Replacing some of our car journeys with cycling would make a big difference to this.

It’s cheap

You can get hold of a durable, road-worthy bicycle relatively cheaply. Maintaining a bike is of course much cheaper than running a car. It’s estimated that the average family could save £642 a year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling. Commuters who drive or pay for a season pass for public transport could make significant savings by swapping to a cycle commute.

Meanwhile, driving is becoming increasingly expensive. More than a million car-owning households spend around a quarter of their disposable income on a motor vehicle, while the charity Sustrans estimates nearly half of households in England struggle with the cost of car ownership.

Getting started

Cycle training

If you aren’t a confident cyclist, or don’t have much experience on a bike, it’s a good idea to consider cycle training. There are cycle trainers across the UK offering training for children and adults – see Cycling UK’s . Some schools run cycle training courses for children, funded by the local authority, through schemes such as Bikeability. If you have children who want to cycle, speak to their school to see if it offers training. If it doesn’t, you could contact the local authority and ask it to support schools to provide training.

Wear a helmet

Brake strongly advises cyclists of all ages and levels of experience to wear a helmet. A helmet won’t offer you complete protection, and sadly helmets don’t prevent crashes happening in the first place – hence Brake campaigns for safer streets and safer driving. However, wearing a good quality, well-fitted cycle helmet does help to protect your brain in some types of crashes or if you fall off your bike and hit your head. Research shows that wearing one reduces your chances of suffering fatal or serious brain injuries in a crash. If you wear a helmet, always make sure you fit it according to the instructions and ensure it isn’t damaged.

Prepare your bike

It’s worthwhile learning the basics of bicycle maintenance if you want to begin cycling. This basic maintenance guide from the BBC is a good starting point. Whether your bike is new, second hand, or it’s been sat in your garage gathering dust, give it a thorough check before you start using it. Familiarising yourself with the mechanics will come in handy if you run into a problem while out cycling. For more in depth information on keeping your bike in good shape, see Bicycling’s maintenance guide.

Remember, it is illegal to cycle at night without lights, so if you are making a bicycle journey in the dark, or there is any chance you might be caught out as the sun goes down, test your lights before setting off. You must have a white light at the front, a red light at the back, red reflectors at the back and amber reflectors on the pedals.

Travelling by bike

Commuting by bike and cycling for work

cyclepath

Cycling to work is good for your health, the environment, and for your pocket, and it’s a great way to get the blood moving and wake the body up first thing in the morning. We recommend you use safe, off-road or segregated cycle paths for as much of your journey as you can, however we know this isn’t always possible. Cycling UK offers a guide to cycle routes that can help you to find safer places to cycle. If your commute is too far to cycle the whole way, you could take the train and cycle the journey to and from the station. See National Rail Enquiries’ information on taking bicycles on the rail network.

You could also check if your employer is signed up for the government’s cycle to work initiative, which allows you to purchase a new bike tax-free and pay monthly straight from your salary. If your employer hasn’t signed up, direct the relevant member of staff to details of benefits to employers of the initiative, and encourage them to sign up.

Using bicycles at work is becoming increasingly common in some professions. Couriers, police and paramedics are among workers who may cycle for work. If you are required to cycle as part of your job, ensure your employer has a robust safe cycling policy, covering: training; clothing; lighting; risk assessment of routes; pre-ride inspections; punctures; storage; theft; and insurance. If they don’t have a policy, talk to your manager.

Cycling to school

Brake advises that children younger than 10 should cycle on safe cycle paths, away from motorised traffic, and should always ride with a grown up. With the right guidance, and safe conditions, most secondary school children will be capable of cycling independently. However, heavy or fast moving traffic, lack of cycling facilities or unsuitable terrain for cycling often makes cycling to school unsafe or impractical.

Many UK schools will draw up a travel plan in partnership with their local authority to enable and encourage active, sustainable and safe travel to school. This includes identifying and working to address any barriers to children walking or cycling safely, including lack of cycling facilities. If you have concerns about your child (or you) being able to cycle safely to school, it’s a good idea to raise these with the school and local authority, and ask if this is to be addressed as part of the school travel plan.

Schools may also offer free cycle training to students through schemes such as Bikeability. Contact the school to see if they offer training, and to enrol your child if it is offered.

Cycling in your area

Do you automatically reach for the car keys when you need to go to the shops? How about when visiting friends or going to the cinema or gym? If destinations like this are within a couple of miles of where you live, consider hopping on a bike instead. Commuting or doing the school run by bike may not be practical for everybody, but most of us will have other opportunities to cycle. Cycling around your local area is a fun and easy way to stretch your legs, get some fresh air and enjoy your community or countryside. 35% of UK journeys of less than two miles are made by car. Many of these could be made by bicycle in less than 20 minutes, helping to reduce traffic volumes, pollution and danger, while allowing you to get fit and save money on petrol and parking.

If your local area doesn’t have suitable cycling facilities, use our community campaign guide to call for improved active and sustainable travel infrastructure in your area.

Take action: support the Place for people campaign.

Cycling on the road

We advise sticking to safe, off-road or segregated cycle paths as much as possible. However there may be times, especially on longer routes, where you will have to cycle on roads with other vehicles. If you are cycling on the road, be sure to stick to the following advice:

  • Choose the safest routes: where you do have to cycle on roads, quieter roads with less traffic, lower (preferably 20mph) speed limits and fewer parked cars and other hazards, are likely to be far safer. You should also consider junctions that are likely to be risky, like busy roundabouts, and either avoid these entirely or walk your bike across them on pavements, crossings or underpasses.
  • Stay vigilant: Look out for any potential hazards or obstructions ahead, such as bumps, pot holes and parked vehicles, and give yourself plenty of time to manoeuvre around them safely. Regularly look behind and to the sides so you are aware of what is happening on the road around you. When cycling past parked cars, leave extra space and watch out for doors being opened.
  • Road position: You should allow at least a metre between you and the kerb. Position yourself even further out from the kerb when on a road where it’s unsafe for a driver to pass you. Giving yourself plenty of distance from the kerb will also help you avoid cycling over drains, debris and other hazards found in or near the gutter.
  • Never pass on the inside: Never attempt to undertake a lorry or bus on the inside, especially at a junction, even if there is a cycle lane. Because of blind spots on large vehicles, the driver may not be able to see you if you pass on their left. It’s better to hold back and wait behind the vehicle. If you must overtake, do it on the right and allow plenty of space to pass safely, and beware of oncoming traffic.
  • Signal clearly: When changing lanes, turning, or any other similar manoeuvre, signal your intent clearly and well in advance so other road users know what you are going to do.
  • Use your lights: If you’re cycling in the dark or in poor visibility conditions you are required to have front and rear lights by law. We recommend you carry small spare lights in case the main lights stop working.

Cycling with children

Cycling with your kids is a great way to stay fit and enjoy some quality time together, while teaching them important road safety lessons. Brake recommends that children under 10 don’t cycle on roads. Many roads are unsafe for children, particularly fast and bendy rural roads and busy town roads without separate space for cyclists.

cycle4life 8

Some communities now have great cycling facilities, including separate paths for cyclists, which can be a great way for children to start enjoying the benefits of cycling while safe from traffic. Safe places to cycle (and have stress-free fun as a family) include off-road cycle trails, parks and many forests and country parks with specially created mountain biking areas and paths. In cities, velodromes often have indoor and outdoor facilities that are open to children of a certain age. Check your local council website for details of facilities in your area, or Cycling UK’s guide to cycle routes to find safe, off-road cycle paths.

You can also help your child gain experience through cycle training arranged through their school or the local authority. Even if it's not safe for them to cycle on local roads, this is helpful for them starting to gain experience, and great if you are planning a cycling holiday.

If your child cycles on roads, help them plan the safest possible routes making use of traffic-free paths and quiet, slow roads, and teach them the importance of following the advice above. Tell them to get off and walk their bike on the pavement if they have to negotiate any busy junctions.

Carrying pre-schoolers

There is a huge range of products on the market designed to transport children by bike, from front- and rear-mounted child seats, to trailers, tag-alongs and tow bars. The best option for you may depend on several factors:

  • your own experience and fitness;
  • number of children;
  • the size and age of the children;
  • the type of route and surface;
  • traffic levels and danger; and
  • the distance you are planning to ride.

If you can, try before you buy. Most cycle shops stock a variety of bikes and child-seat accessories that you can test out with your children.

Be aware that child carriers increase the size of your bike, alter the balance, and can make manoeuvring more challenging. Child seats on bikes aren’t safety seats with crash protection, and uncovered seats offer no protection from the elements either – a child who is not pedalling can get very cold or sunburnt so ensure they are well wrapped up or are wearing suncream, depending on the weather.

Trailers place your child at the level of vehicles’ wheels and exhaust fumes, and therefore Brake does not recommend they are used on roads, although they can be great on off-road, well-surfaced cycle trails.

 


Page updated October 2018

 

Brake annual reception, January 2017

Speech by Mary Williams OBE, chief executive, Brake, annual reception for the charity, Westminster, 25 January 2017

To quote Martin Luther King, “The time is always right to do what is right.”

Time is an unruly beast however. 

It has a habit of speeding up and slowing down.

For busy families, and busy workers, in our busy world, it moves fast. The temptation to multi-task; to drive while on a smart phone, to break speed limits, to take the car rather than cycle and save the planet, are life-threatening, climate endangering behaviours fuelled by pressures of time. They cause drivers to prioritise ‘in the moment’, wrongly, and to devastating effect.

Time can stop in a moment.

Time grinds to a halt when someone is killed or seriously injured in a road crash. Our routines are suspended. Suddenly, our attention is focussed.

It’s beautifully summed up in WH Auden’s famous poem so often used at funerals.  “Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone. Scribble on the sky the message “he is dead”.”

Yet, consumed by grief and distress, we are given a strange and precious gift. We are given the gift of sight. We can see what matters above all – people and life. As Auden puts it: “he was my north, my south, my east, my west.”

Whether we can see it or not, the time is always right to put humanity first.

“The time is always right to do what is right.” 

There are so many affected families who work alongside Brake, bravely, to fight for humanity. To fight for what others cannot see through the haze of the day to day.

To fight for appropriately grave sentences for drivers who kill and injure through wanton actions:

use of smart phones and other on-board screens.

drink and drug driving.

speeding, or driving unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured.

knowingly driving a mechanically unfit vehicle or driving tired.  

Campaigning takes time – frustrating amounts of time. Brake has been fighting for tougher sentences for more than 20 years. Last year, working with affected families, we elevated our Roads to Justice campaign in the media.

The current government consultation road traffic offences provides a real and urgent opportunity to redress paltry sentencing.

There are so many campaigns that Brake has found, to our cost, take inordinate time, when the road ahead seems so clear.

There are so many campaigns we have consistently supported, are still outstanding and that this government has a chance to resolve. 

A reduction in the drink drive limit, to stop our country being infamous for having the highest limit in Europe.

The government has the public with them. More than three quarters of drivers we surveyed in partnership with Direct Line think our limit is too high.

Approved testing devices to catch MDMA and cocaine drivers.

20mph limits as a default for built up roads.

A country-wide network of segregated cycle lanes that connect places, enabling, fast, healthy, zero emission transport.

Prioritisation of pedestrianisation, with wide and safe pavements, crossing places and livable traffic free spaces, enabling people to move our bodies, talk to our children, meet our neighbours. Invigorating communities.

A country with transport powered by clean fuels, to end the carnage of respiratory deaths from particulate pollution. There is more than one way a vehicle can kill you.  

Vehicles, speed, air pollution and people just don’t mix. It’s possible, but not yet, that automated vehicles of the future will be able to stop on a penny for every hazard.

But that doesn’t and will never change our need to move our bodies, and consequently be healthy, happy people, particularly our children and their need to walk, run, hop and skip in safety and while breathing clean air.   

This week’s very high air pollution warning in London and the mayor’s announcement of “toxic air audits” at London schools drives home the importance of super-charging policy measures to enable low-carbon transport. 

Brake is fighting for a world that is safe, green, clean and fair, with zero road casualties and emissions from transport. This is a vision of sustainable mobility.

The United Nation’s 2020 deadline is rapidly approaching, for a halving of road deaths and injuries globally through safe systems and the 2030 goal of clean transport.  

This government has the power to stop the clock. To see what needs to be done. To be at the forefront of road safety solutions globally.

Over the past year, Brake has looked hard at our role providing education. We’ve particularly reflected on the difficulties of a campaigning, awareness raising charity achieving immediate behavioural change among individual drivers. Our surveys tell us time and again that many drivers understand risks, and do it anyway.

More than half of 25-34 year old drivers we questioned last year admitted sending or reading messages while driving.

Behavioural changes takes time. We haven’t got time.

The reality is that, while Brake can raise awareness, change needs to come from the top, and fast. 

To provide more funding for victim support.

To eliminate road casualties through safe systems.

To enable all vehicles to be clean vehicles.

But together we are so much stronger. I want to thank all supporters of the charity who help enable that change.

The families bereaved and injured, and their supportive communities, who raise awareness of the cause and fundraise.

The teachers who promote Road Safety Week in their schools, enabling children to pester power their parents to slow down.

The police and other road safety professionals, particularly family liaison officers, doing such an important task supporting affected families.

The companies prioritising managing their road risk, investing in low-carbon transport, or providing funds to the charity.

To our governments for part-funding Road Safety Week and our national victim helpline.

And last but not least to the Brake team of staff I am privileged to work with, many of whom are here tonight also.

When a life ends, time is suspended. We have clarity. Let’s use that clarity to keep fighting for humanity. 

 

 

Brake calls for reintroduction of casualty reduction targets, as road deaths and serious injuries rise

Thursday 24 September 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, is calling on the government to show strong leadership and reintroduce casualty reduction targets as the Department for Transport publishes its Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain Annual Report for 2014. It shows that 1,775 people died on the roads (a 4% increase on the year before). 22,807 more were seriously injured (a 5% annual increase).

Casualties of all severities rose to 194,477 in Great Britain in 2014, an increase of 6% from 2013, interrupting what was a steady downward trend since 1997.

Brake believes the reintroduction of ambitious casualty reduction targets, axed in 2010, must be a key first step in an urgently needed fightback against road danger, alongside a ‘vision zero’ approach that acknowledges that any number of road deaths is unacceptable.

People on foot and bike bore the brunt of the rise:

  • Pedestrian deaths rose by 12% to 446, accounting for three quarters of the overall rise in fatalities.
  • Serious injuries to cyclists rose by 8% to 3,401, continuing a long term trend that has been ongoing since 2004.

Worryingly, traffic levels in 2014 were 2.4% higher than in 2013. Air pollution is estimated to cause 24,000 deaths a year in the UK, half attributable to road transport [1].  The number of cars is set to increase by 43% by 2035 and traffic delays by 50% [2].

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: “We should be under no illusions as to the seriousness of these figures. The government needs to get a grip of this situation, and it can start by reintroducing ambitious casualty reduction targets, with an ultimate aim of reducing deaths and serious injuries on our roads to zero. We know from running our helpline for devastated road crash victims that every road death causes unimaginable human suffering, and every one is preventable. The increases in serious casualties among pedestrians and cyclists are especially horrifying, given the importance of protecting vulnerable road users and enabling people to walk and cycle more.

“At a time when car manufacturers have serious questions to answer on vehicle emissions, it is worrying to see a growth in vehicle traffic. The price for this is being paid by individuals, families and the planet, and it’s not a price worth paying. That’s why our theme for this year’s Road Safety Week, Drive less, live more, is focused on encouraging people to think again about why, when and how we drive private vehicles.”

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

 [1] The Cost of Air Pollution, OECD (2014)

 [2] Keeping the Nation Moving – Time to face the facts, RAC Foundation (2011)

 

Brake comments as 3 in 5 adults feel it is too dangerous to cycle on the roads

News from Brake
Wednesday 31 July 2019
 
3 in 5 adults in England feel that it is too dangerous for them to cycle on the roads, according to statistics published by the Department for Transport today.
 
The National Travel Attitude Survey found that 61% of adults aged 18+ in England agreed that “it is too dangerous for me to cycle on the roads”. The survey also revealed that Women were more likely than men to agree (68% to 54%) and people were just as likely to agree if they were aged 25-34 as they were aged 65 and older. Cyclists were less likely to believe that cycling was too dangerous for them than non-cyclists (50% to 65%).
 
Road safety charity, Brake, believe that these findings reveal just how much work needs to be done to convince people that it is safe to cycle on the roads, and have called for further action from the Government.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake said:
 
“Cycling is one of the healthiest and cheapest ways to get around and everyone should be able to cycle every day without fear for their own safety. Yet these findings reveal that most adults just don’t think its safe to cycle on our roads and more is clearly needed to be done to convince them otherwise.
 
“Whilst the Government’s actions to encourage more people to cycle and keep them safe are welcome, they must go further. We need slower, safer speed limits, greater investment in segregated cycle lanes and drivers who behave dangerously removed from our roads.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:
 

Brake comments as Britain’s road safety record stagnates

News from Brake
Thursday 27 September
 
Improvement in Britain’s road safety has stagnated, with the number of people killed and seriously injured on Britain’s roads increasing marginally from 2016 - 2017, according to Government statistics published today [1].
 
Figures from the Department for Transport show that 1,793 people were killed in collisions last year,  the highest annual total since 2011 but with just one additional road death on 2016.
 
A total of 24,831 people were seriously injured last year - a rise of three per cent (from 24,101 in 2016), which has been attributed by the Government at least in part due to changes in the way many police forces now report collision data [1].
 
The figures also reveal that motorcyclists now make up 19% of all road deaths in Britain, up 9% on 2016 to 349 deaths, and pedestrian fatalities increased by 5% to 470.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
Today’s figures highlight the shocking lack of progress on road safety improvement in Britain. This stagnation must be arrested and yet the Government sits on its hands and rejects the introduction of policies which are proven to save lives - for the individuals, families and whole communities devastated by road crashes, this is simply not good enough.”
 
“Our most vulnerable road users, pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists, remain at dangerously high risk on our roads, paying the price for the dominance of the motor car in our lives. Pedestrian deaths increased to their highest level this decade whilst motorcyclists now account for nearly a fifth of all road deaths, despite their small numbers. The Government must invest in active travel to give people safe and healthy ways to get around and focus on improving the safety of our roads – starting with lower speed limits.”
 
“Our laws are only as strong as their enforcement and roads policing is fundamental to improving UK road safety. Shockingly, the number of traffic officers fell 24% from 2012-2017 and the stagnation in road safety performance shadows this trend. We urge the Government to make roads policing a national investment priority, with a visible police presence catching and deterring illegal driving and cameras preventing the scourge of speeding.”
 
“Casualty reduction targets are a proven catalyst for road safety improvement and yet, since 2010, the UK Government has rejected this approach. With the UK’s deterioration in road safety showing no signs of abating, we urge the introduction of national road casualty reduction targets as a priority. The Government must have its feet held to the fire on road safety.”
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors:
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake comments on cycling offence announcement

News from Brake
Friday, 9 March 2018
 
The Department for Transport has published a report that finds there is a strong case for changing the law to tackle the issue of dangerous and careless cycling that causes injury or death. If this were to be introduced, it would bring cycling in line with driving offences.
 
Commenting on the announcement, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns at road safety charity Brake, said: “Delivering justice for those who have lost a loved one on our roads is vitally important. Whether a crash was caused by a bike or a car makes no difference to the families devastated by such loss and so we welcome the move by the Government to provide parity in the law.”
 
The publication of the report comes alongside a call for evidence on the Government’s Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy. This is part of the Government’s drive to make cycling and walking safer, while encouraging more people to take up cycling at all ages.
 
Mr Harris said: “Getting more journeys to be taken by bike or by foot, rather than by car, can deliver significant personal and public health benefits. Brake welcomes this opportunity to improve the road environment for cyclists and pedestrians and urges the Government to not shy away from the big decisions, such as implementing and enforcing safer speed limits.”
 
A Brake and Direct Line report [1], published yesterday (Thursday 8 March), found that drivers are deterred from choosing to cycle by the nature of the current road environment. Drivers stated that the 60mph speed limit on single-carriageway A roads is too fast to assure the safety of cyclists and that both the warning signs and space available for cyclists are inadequate.
 
Drivers have called on the Government to address these concerns by investing in building segregated, tarmacked cycle paths alongside the single-carriageway A road network, prioritising this above any expansion of the road itself. Brake and Direct Line’s report finds that such investment would significantly increase the numbers of those cycling, as whilst 70 per cent of drivers state that they currently never cycle on single-carriageway A roads, more than half state that they would be persuaded to if there was a demarcated space for cyclists.
 
Mr Harris said: “Contrary to popular opinion, drivers have told us that they are willing to switch modes and cycle if safe facilities are available. We echo this call and urge the Government to prioritise investment in safe, segregated cycle routes.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake comments on plans to revise Highway Code for cyclist and pedestrian safety

News from Brake
Thursday 18 November
 
The government has announced that it is set to review guidance on how road users should behave in relation to cyclists and pedestrians. The new Highway Code will highlight how to avoid the dangers of close passing, and encourage people to adopt the ‘Dutch reach’, a method of opening a car door with the hand furthest from the handle, to force drivers to look over their shoulder for passing traffic.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said:
 
"For far too long, the rules of our roads have prioritised motor vehicles over cycling and walking. This has resulted in a vicious circle of increased risk for pedestrians and cyclists, fewer people opting to walk or cycle, and limited government investment - not to mention the devastating impact on public health and the environment. We applaud the Government’s planned changes to the Highway Code as a welcome step in the right direction, but more must still be done. We need safer speed limits, greater investment in segregated cycle lanes and a justice system which keeps dangerous drivers off our roads.”
 
“Today’s announcement is timely, arriving a month ahead of Road Safety Week where communities across the UK will be shouting about the need for everyone to be “Bike Smart”. Those travelling on two wheels are among our most vulnerable road users and everyone can play a role in helping keep them safe from harm.”
 
[ENDS]
 
 
Notes to editors:
[1] Road Safety Week is coordinated by Brake and will be held from 19-25 November. This year’s theme is “Bike Smart”, and communities and campaigners across the country will be shouting about the safety of those on two wheels. More at Brake’s website here - http://roadsafetyweek.org.uk/
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake launches ‘Drive less, live more’ interactive resource to reduce car journeys and make streets safer in the run up to Road Safety Week

Wednesday 4th November
Contact e:
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive resource in the lead up to Road Safety Week 23–29 November 2015, with the theme'Drive less, live more'. Developed in partnership with AIG and Specsavers, the resource encourages everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by reducing car journeys and walking, cycling or using public transport instead.

Every day five people die on UK roads, and over 60 are seriously injured – resulting in needless devastation, trauma and suffering1. The vast majority of casualties are down to driver error. Road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are crucial. It’s about doing what we can to protect ourselves and the people around us to make our streets safer. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all.

Many people walk the few metres from their front door to the car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A shocking four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles2. Brake is asking everyone this Road Safety Week to consider how they use roads, and pledge to leave their car at home, at least for some journeys.

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only makes our streets safer by reducing traffic danger, but has personal benefits too. It can save money in car costs; help people live more active lives; reduce stress and illness; reinvigorate communities; and cut congestion and pollution.

The open-access‘Drive less, live more’ resource can be used to facilitate discussion about the importance of driving less. It can be used by anyone who works with drivers, including: fleet professionals and employers; driving instructors; road safety professionals and emergency services; teachers; community leaders; and by individuals directly wanting to see how they can help themselves and their community by driving less. Brake is especially encouraging families to use theDrive less, live more resource to reduce school-run and commuter traffic, and asking businesses to manage at-work journeys.

Access the resource online now atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessinteractive.

Gary Rae, Director of Communications and Campaigns, said: Our new ‘Drive less, live more’ e-learning resource shows people the benefits of walking, cycling or taking public transport, particularly for shorter journeys. The resource is a powerful tool that shows that by driving less, you can improve road safety and prevent casualties, become more active, and protect the planet. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, employers, driving instructors and educators to help them raise awareness of the benefits of active and sustainable transport.”

The facts

By 2035 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 45% and traffic delays by 64%3.

Four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles – short enough to replace with a pleasant walk or cycle ride. Currently, one in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of our children are driven to school4, even though the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles5.

One in four adults in England is obese and a further 37% are overweight6. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year7. Incorporating activity like walking and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight8, and can help guard against serious illnesses such as asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers9.

Commuting by public transport can also improve overall fitness. People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have been shown to have a lower BMI and a healthier bodyweight10.

Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs11. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling12.

Groups can register to take part atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors Specsavers and AIG.

The theme of Road Safety Week 2015, 23-29 November, is about making our roads and communities safer, happier places for everyone, by encouraging people to‘Drive less, live more’.

Brake has been running this successful event for 17 years, growing its reach and impact. We now share our experience globally atwww.roadsafetyweek.org, to help others run Road Safety Weeks and similar events in other countries.

Five people die every day on UK roads and around 60 are seriously injured. Brake’s priority is tackling these devastating tragedies, and making our streets safe for people to use without fear or threat. Reducing traffic is an important part of this.

Brake’s main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or the BrakeBlog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2010

[3] Road Transport Forecasts 2011, Department for Transport, 2011

[4] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[5] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[6] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, 2013 NHS, 2013

[7] Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, et al., ‘Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd Ed)’, Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[8] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[9] NHShttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx, 2015

[10] Flint Ellen, Cummins Steven, Sacker Amanda, ‘Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index:  population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom’, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[11] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[12] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Brake partners with Aardman to launch early years road safety project Beep Beep! Day with Timmy Time

News from Brake
Wednesday 09 October 2019
 

Young children can now learn road safety basics with the help of characters from popular children’s animation Timmy Time.

Timmy – the littlest lamb in Shaun the Sheep’s flock – now features in a series of fun new resources produced by road safety charity Brake for its Beep Beep! Day project.

Beep Beep! Day with Timmy Time engages young children, aged 2-7, with road safety basics through fun activities, while raising awareness among parents and the wider community about keeping children safe near roads. The project, in partnership with Churchill Insurance, is now in its fifteenth year and will take place on Wednesday 20 November, during UK Road Safety Week (18-24 November). Educators can also run a Beep Beep! Day on a date of their choice.

For the past decade Timmy has featured in his own TV series Timmy Time, which is created by award-winning animation studio Aardman and is a spin-off from Shaun the Sheep. The show makes a return to CBeebies this month (October) and follows the antics of the little lamb as he attends nursery with friends to learn about the world around him. Through the Beep Beep! Day resources, Timmy and his friends will help children understand important road safety messages, while giving them skills to talk to grown-ups about what they can do to keep them safe.

The project is free to get involved with and includes digital resources for nurseries, schools and child minders – all featuring characters from Timmy Time. Educators also have an option of buying a low-cost ‘bumper pack’ full of all the activities, including stickers and certificates for every child.

Brake has been helping schools, nurseries and parents talk to children about keeping safe near roads for almost 25 years. In 2018, more than 300,000 children are estimated to have taken part in a Beep Beep! Day, from more than 2,500 schools, nurseries or childminding settings.

On average, six children are killed or seriously injured on roads in Britain every day [1], and the World Health Organization says road crashes are the leading killer of children and young adults (aged 5–29) globally [2]. As part of the project, children can fundraise to support Brake’s work campaigning for safer roads and supporting people who have been bereaved or seriously injured following a road crash.

Beep Beep! Day with Timmy Time resources will be hosted on Brake’s new Zebras website for children, teachers and families. Find out more at brakezebras.org/beep.

Dave Nichols, community engagement manager at Brake, said: “We’re delighted to be working with Aardman on this project and think Timmy will really help engage children with the important topic of road safety. These iconic characters will not only help children learn vital messages that will stay with them for life but also give them a voice to call on grown-ups to use roads safely. We look forward to having even more children get involved this year and support Brake’s vision of a world where they can all enjoy safe and healthy journeys.”

Lucy Brooksbank, Head of Marketing at Churchill, said: “We are very proud to be supporting Beep Beep! Day in its fifteenth year. The new wide range of resources crafted in partnership with Aardman not only make this a fun day but help to make a difference too. Brake’s activity is pivotal in helping to stop children from becoming seriously injured on our roads and Beep Beep! Day has always been a great way to get young children talking about road safety. We’re excited to see lots of educators using the new resources to continue raising awareness on this topic.”

Laura Burr, Brand Manager at Aardman, said: “It’s great to be working with Brake. Learning about road safety is so important, and we hope that involving Timmy will not only help educate young children, but also add some fun.”

To find out more, or to register for a Beep Beep! Day, visit brakezebras.org/beep, call 01484 550061 or email beepbeep@brake.org.uk

 
[ENDS]
 

*** Hi-res images available here ***

 

Notes to Editors:

References

[1] Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain: Annual Report 2018

[2] Global Status Report on Road Safety, 2018, World Health Organisation

 

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths, serious injuries and pollution occurring on our roads every day. We work to make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake's vision is a world where there are zero road deaths and injuries, and people can get around in ways that are safe, sustainable, healthy and fair. We do this by pushing for legislative change through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog and use #BeepBeepDay

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

About Aardman

Aardman, based in Bristol (UK) and co-founded in 1976 by Peter Lord and David Sproxton, is an independent and multi-award-winning studio. It produces feature films, series, advertising, games and interactive entertainment - such as the ‘visually astonishing’ (The Guardian), BAFTA nominated console game, 11-11: Memories Retold, and the four-times Gold Cannes Lions-winning StorySign app - and innovative attractions for both the domestic and international market, including a new 4D theatre attraction at Efteling in the Netherlands. Its productions are global in appeal, novel, entertaining, brilliantly characterised and full of charm reflecting the unique talent, energy and personal commitment of the Aardman team. The studio’s work – which includes the creation of much-loved characters including Wallace & Gromit, Shaun the Sheep and Morph – is often imitated, and yet the company continues to lead the field producing a rare brand of visually stunning content for cinema, broadcasters, digital platforms and live experiences around the world. In November 2018 it became an Employee Owned Organisation, to ensure Aardman remains independent and to secure the creative legacy and culture of the company for many decades to come. www.aardman.com   

About Timmy Time

Timmy is the littlest lamb in Shaun the Sheep’s flock and the star of his own award-winning spin-off series Timmy Time, which premiered on CBeebies in April 2009 and is broadcast in over 150 territories worldwide. Timmy Time is set in a Nursery and the core audience are preschoolers. Each episode follows a day in the life of Timmy and his friends as they learn about life and friendship. The original series consisted of 78 ten-minute episodes with no dialogue. Aardman recently produced an updated version of Timmy Time for a new generation of fans, creating five-minute edits of the original episodes and featuring a child’s voiceover.

www.timmytime.tv

 

About Churchill

Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by U K Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England and Wales No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. 

Churchill and U K Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. 

Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0300 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com

 

Brake responds to Cycling and Walking consultation.

Department for Transport consultation on cycling and walking investment strategy

Response from Brake, the road safety charity, May 2015

Brake’s position on cycling and walking investment

Brake welcomes this consultation and its acknowledgement that further investment in cycling and walking is essential. Currently a quarter of car journeys (23%) are less than two miles[i], a distance which can easily be covered on foot or by bike.

Brake believes road safety isn’t solely about driving safely and within the law. It’s also about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing everything we can to protect ourselves and people around us, especially vulnerable road users. A big part of that is providing infrastructure that not only encourages active travel but also protects those who walk and cycle from the dangers on our roads.

Brake has more than 20 years’ experience in the road safety and sustainable transport field and can point to policies that can be deployed to try to increase the numbers walking and cycling address the issue of inactivity and.

On the basis of Brake’s experience in road safety, Brake recommends

• Reducing the urban speed limit 20mph, instead of 30mph. This is in line with evidence that shows reducing speed limits lowers casualty numbers amongst those who cycle and walk.
• Implementing more segregated cycle ways. This is in line with evidence that shows that the injury risk to cyclists reduces significantly.
• Create and invest in improved infrastructure that benefits cycling and walking both in the long term and the short term.
• Create new routes that encourage cycling and walking.

Some key evidence supporting these recommendations includes:

• The implementation of bike lanes has been shown to cut injury risk to cyclists by 50%, dedicated bike lanes cut injury risk to cyclists significantly more, by 90%[ii].
• A trial of 20mph limits in Warrington, Cheshire, found pedestrian and cyclist casualties dropped 36%[iii] and analysis of 75 20mph limit sites in Scotland found casualties dropped 42%[iv].
• Walking and cycling levels rose by up to 12% in Bristol after a 20mph limit was introduced[v].
• 20mph limits boost the economic sustainability of local areas. Safer areas for walking and cycling are seen as more desirable areas to live, boosting local businesses and increasing the value of homes in these areas[vi].
• Fear of traffic can also discourage people from walking or cycling. A Brake survey found one in three non-cyclists (35%) would cycle their commute if routes were safer[vii].
• A YouGov poll commissioned by British Cycling revealed that 71% of people support building cycle tracks on main roads[viii].

Question One: The Government would be interested to hear views on the approach and actions set out in section 8 of this strategy

The three themes mentioned in section 8 which will deliver the ambition of the government, could be improved significantly. On Better Safety, there needs to be more done to ensure policing of speed limits are enforces by the police – this is proving to be more difficult as numbers of traffic offices have decreased significantly since 2008, by nearly 12% in the United Kingdom[ix]. With better policed roads and lower limits – cyclists and pedestrians would feel safer and more inclined to choose forms of active travel than using their cars.

On Better Mobility, more needs to be done to integrate all forms of transport to promote active travel. Not only does the Government have to do more to promote cycling and walking – more needs to be done to integrate public transport with active travel with all public transport stations requiring more cycle spaces and the right environments that makes active travel more appealing.

Finally, with Better Streets, there needs to be serious thought given to town and street planning, to create an environment for all road users and not just cars as there has been in the past.

The most important point to take from the strategies outlined in section 8 is that what has been outlined requires appropriate funding nationwide. The United Kingdom has one of the lowest usages of cycles in Europe as the main mode of transport, only six nations in Europe rank lower[x]. Without appropriate funding, more than the £316million[xi] promised over the next five years, then it is likely that the targets outlines will be missed and the United Kingdom will continue to lag behind the more forward thinking European nations.

Question Three: The Government would be interested to hear suggestions and evidence of innovative projects and programmes which could be developed to deliver the objectives outlined in Section 4.

For the objectives set out in section four to be achieved, the focus must be on consulting local residents and those who cycle and walk on their own needs. There certainly is an appetite for cycling and walking, especially on shorter journeys. In recent surveys conducted by Brake we found that three in four parents (74%) say their family would walk more if the safety of nearby roads was improved[xii] and three in four school children (76%) would like to walk and cycle more, but more than half (56%) worry they might be run over when walking or cycling on roads[xiii].

A recent survey by Churchill Insurance indicated 35% of parents felt road safety at their local school had worsened in the past five years. To improve safety on roads around schools, through cycle lanes, 20mph speed limits and improved crossings would ensure that more school children would use active travel in their daily routine to get to school.

Furthermore, Britain ranked 23rd for progress in tackling cycling deaths over the period between 2003 and 2013, seeing a fall of less than 3%[xiv]. Without appropriate funding, planning and strategy the desire to double cycling activity by 2025 will falter. Whilst the appetite is there for an increase in participation in active travel, the funding is not and perhaps more of the funding that has been ring-fenced for road projects needs to be redistributed to ensure a safer environment to encourage walking and cycling.

Question Four: The Government would be interested to hear your views on how to increase cycling and walking in typically under-represented groups (for example women, older people, or those from black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds

Brake believes that participation in walking and cycling by under-represented groups would be increased by making urban speed limits 20mph. As evidence mentioned earlier shows, roads are safer for cyclists and pedestrians with the lower limit and more people are inclined to walk or cycle more as they feel safer. This is especially the case among the most vulnerable in our society such as older people, children and parents with young children.

As for targeting those from different ethnic backgrounds the impetus should be on getting underrepresented groups into cycling and walking when they are young; educating them on the benefits and in the case of cycling – teaching them in schools. The Bikeability scheme, which has seen nearly two million people trained, would be the ideal resource to use as it could be rolled out to schools with a diverse ethnic background.

One further way that under-represented groups could be encouraged into cycling is through Bike Libraries. The scheme that was launched in Yorkshire as part of the legacy of the Grand Depart of the Tour de France in 2014 has seen 31 bike libraries created across the county, providing a place where people can give away their old and unused bikes to be loaned out to those who need them. This would be ideal in deprived areas and in areas from differing background who may not get an opportunity to own, use or learn to ride a bike.

[i] National Travel Survey 2014, Department for Transport, 2015
[ii] American Journal of Public Health, 2012.
[iii] 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[iv] 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001
[v] Greater Bristol Cycling City, Bristol City Council, 2011
[vi] Motor Vehicle Speeds: Recommendations for Urban Sustainability, Transportation Research Board, 2012
[vii] Commuters call for safer streets for cycling, to enable more to get on their bikes, Brake 2015
[viii] New poll reveals overwhelming public support for new cycling infrastructure, British Cycling 2016

[ix] Research briefing: levels of traffic police 2008-2012 in GB, Brake, 2013
[x] UK ranked Europe's 10th Most Cycle Friendly Nation, Road.cc, 2013
[xi] Time for action on clean air, Sustrans, 2016
[xii] Bereaved family back Beep Beep! initiative for safer roads for kids as survey reveals parents’ fears from fast traffic, Brake and Churchill, 2012
[xiii] Kids want to get active: thousands march for safer streets, Brake and webuyanycar.com, 2014
[xiv] Making Walking and Cycling on Europe’s roads safer, European Transport Safety Council, 2015.

 

Brake urges full review of road safety laws as cycling offence consultation is launched

News from Brake
Sunday, 12 August 2018
 
The Department for Transport has announced the launch of a consultation which will look at whether a new offence equivalent to causing death by careless or dangerous driving should be introduced for dangerous cyclists.
 
Commenting on the announcement, Joshua Harris, Director of Campaigns at road safety charity Brake, said:
“Whilst the intentions behind the Government’s announcement are sound, they are trying to fix a fundamentally flawed legal framework. A full review of road safety law is required and frankly long overdue. All too often families are denied justice, with drivers who kill let off with pitifully lenient sentences, and the public endangered through dangerous drivers evading driving bans. The Government must review all road safety law to protect the public and deliver justice for the families of those devastated by road death.”
 
The Department for Transport has also announced that it will look at updating parts of the Highway Code, including measures to counter the dangerous practice of ‘close passing’ and that it has commissioned the Cycle Proofing Working Group to develop national guidance and best practice for cycling and walking infrastructure, so that all road users can benefit from the best facilities.
 
Commenting on the announcement, Joshua Harris, Director of Campaigns at road safety charity Brake, said:
“Cycling is one of the healthiest, cheapest and most environmentally-friendly forms of transport available and yet cyclists’ vulnerability put many off getting on a bike. We welcome the move by the Government to address the danger of “close passing” but encourage them to go further to improve cycle safety. This year’s Road Safety Week theme is ‘Bike Smart’ and from 19-25 November we will be encouraging everyone to shout about the safety of those on two wheels – we hope the Government listens and acts to improve cyclist safety”
 
 [ENDS]
 
Notes to editors
  • Road Safety Week is the UK's biggest road safety event, coordinated annually by Brake, the road safety charity.
Road Safety Week aims to inspire thousands of schools, organisations and communities to take action on road safety and promote life-saving messages during the Week and beyond. It also provides a focal point for professionals working in road safety to boost awareness and engagement in their work. Road Safety Week website
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Brake's Giant Walk 2016 - what happened

On 15 June 2016 over 25,000 children from schools across the UK walked for safer roads, to encourage drivers to GO 20 around schools, homes and shops to protect children and other cyclists and pedestrians. The event also promoted the benefits of walking and cycling, and raised awareness of the fact that in the UK every day four children are seriously hurt or killed while walking.

A big thank you to all the schools that took part, helping to teach pupils about road danger and the benefits of sustainable, active travel, promoting road safety to parents and drivers in the wider community, and raising valuable funds for Brake.

See below for examples of what our star schools in 2016 did on the day, see more pictures on our facebook page and follow @Brakecharity and use #BrakesGiantWalk on Twitter!

Read our full report on Brake's Giant Walk 2016

 

 

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The children at St John the Baptist C of E Primary School in Penistone had lots of fun showing off their posters as they walked around the local village. A local councillor and staff from their local Tesco store also joined them, encouraging drivers to slow down and supporting their message of not driving to school. Check them out in action in our 2016 video.

 

  

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Pupils and parents from St John’s C of E Primary School in Harrow, London, joined forces to campaign for safer roads in their community. The children made their own placards and raised awareness in their local community, encouraging drivers to slow down. Teachers said they found it a really positive experience, bringing the school communities together to help raise awareness of road safety. Fantastically, alongside all of their hard work they raised more than £1000 for Brake!

 

 

 

  

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Brake’s mascot Zak the Zebra joined more than 300 children from Neilston Primary School in Scotland. They learned about how to be safe on their walk before meeting up with another school and holding a mini road show. A local police officer talked about the importance of road safety and school principal teacher Jane McDermott said “Watching the children out in the village gives a great feeling of togetherness and community as well as promoting the importance of road safety.

 

 

giantwalk dunstableAt St Augustine’s Academy, Bedfordshire, in partnership with Dunstable Town Council, the children played road safety games and discussed how to be safe when crossing the road. They then created their own posters and used these, along with Brake’s, to take to the streets during a long two-mile walk to raise awareness of road safety in their local community. The children enjoyed using their posters to communicate important messages about slowing down to drivers and the young people who participated on the walk continued to learn about road safety at Junior Wardens - an after school programme.

  

 

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Lots of laughs and fun was had at the 11th Walsall Rainbows in West Midlands. The girls really enjoyed learning about road safety all term and completed their road safety badge. They also made posters which they showed their parents and told them the importance of being safe on the roads. They loved getting their stickers for completing the walk and found the resources really informative.

  

 

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River Beach Primary School didn’t let the soggy weather dampen their walk as they met in the morning and all walked to school together, campaigning for drivers to slow down. They were met at the school gates by their teachers, congratulating them on their walk before dispersing into class to continue their school day.

 

 

 

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400 children took part at Carnmoney Primary School in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, who managed to raise a wonderful £381.60! Alongside their walk around the community where they campaigned for safer roads, they held different road safety activities within class. They also had a poster colouring competition and the winner got theirs made into a placard to carry on their walk!

 

 

 

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Barmston Village School went on their walk outside of their school gates so that the local community in Durham could notice them. They took their ‘slow down’ banners, having lots of fun spreading the message of being safe around roads. In class they made their own posters on the different issues surrounding road safety and the importance of drivers slowing down on their roads.

 

 

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In Liverpool, over 1000 children took part in road safety activities which emphasised the importance of St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Infant and Junior School’s Giant Walk. School Council Representatives met and discussed ideas to raise awareness of road safety prior to the event. A competition was launched to design the best road safety poster; these posters were used on the day to encourage drivers in their community to slow down. The children also had lots of fun chanting and making their voices heard. They even had their parents out campaigning while they stood opposite the school with their own posters and banners and invited families to complete a ‘Family Road Safety Pledge’ to show how everyone works together to ensure their children’s safety.

 

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Red Oaks Primary School in Wiltshire took what they’d learnt throughout the year on road safety and incorporated it into their walk. Alongside their lessons on road safety and discussion on how to be safe and be seen in assembly, they took to the streets to tell drivers to slow down. They also raised £209.92 to help continue Brake’s work.

 

 

 

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Local police officers visited Gayton Junior School in Derby on their Giant Walk to help their 360 children cross the road. The children’s parents also joined in, helping to raise awareness of the importance of slowing down. In preparation for their walk, the children made informative posters and discussed road safety in class. They raised a fantastic £115.15 for Brake!

Cambridge MP wins prestigious award for outstanding contribution to road safety

15 January 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, has been given a prestigious national award for his successful campaign for widespread 20mph limits in his Cambridge constituency, to make roads safer and encourage more people to walk and cycle.

Julian received the 'Parliamentarian of the Year: Community Campaigner' award at road safety charity Brake's annual reception at the Houses of Parliament last night, sponsored by Direct Line Group (photo attached).

Julian's campaigning for safer roads for walking and cycling spans back to 2006, when as leader of the Liberal Democrats in Cambridgeshire County Council, he demanded the council reconsider its negative position on 20mph limits in light of Portsmouth's decision to implement widespread 20mph limits. After three years of campaigning, the council agreed to trial 20mph limits in small areas of Cambridge city centre.

In 2010, Julian led a committee of MPs, the All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Group (which he later joined as an MP), on a tour of Cambridge to show them the benefits of 20mph limits for cyclists. Shortly after this, Julian was elected as MP for Cambridge, and once again took up the mantle of campaigning for safer streets. He began calling for widespread 20mph limits across Cambridge, to make the entire city safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

In March 2013, Cambridge City Council announced it will implement 20mph limits on most residential and shopping streets, which will be phased in from January 2014. Read about the Council's plans.

Julian has been a vocal advocate of 20mph limits in the media as well as in Parliament, as co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cycling. The group's Get Britain Cycling report, published in 2013, called for 20mph limits to become the default on urban streets alongside a host of other measures to make streets safer and encourage greater levels of cycling.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Brake believes everyone has the right to walk or cycle safely, without fear from fast traffic, and we know that 20mph limits are a critical step towards this. By speaking out for walking and cycling, successfully campaigning for widespread 20mph limits in Cambridge, and raising awareness in media and Parliament about the benefits, Julian has brought this vision a little closer. We're delighted to be giving Julian recognition for his dedication to making streets safer for people to walk and cycle in Cambridge and the rest of the UK."

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, said: "I am delighted and honoured to have won this award from Brake. We do need to make roads much safer for people to walk and cycle, and 20mph limits will help to do that. I am really pleased that Cambridge City Council has taken such bold steps to make sure this becomes a reality."

Tim Ward, Cambridge City Executive Councillor for Planning and Transport, said: "A city-wide 20mph scheme has many potential benefits, including reducing the number of crashes, reducing congestion, and improving people's health as they feel more confident to cycle and to let their children cycle. Large scale 20mph schemes are the most cost-effective way of getting more people to cycle; the total cost of the Cambridge scheme is similar to that of re-designing one major road junction. Local residents have campaigned for years for small 20mph schemes, so I thought it best to meet this and future demand by implementing 20mph limits in residential streets across the whole city, which will work out cheaper than doing a handful of streets at a time."

Read about Brake's GO 20 campaign, calling for 20mph limits to be the norm in our cities, towns and villages.

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Direct Line Insurance Group plc (Direct Line Group) is headquartered in Bromley, Kent; it has operations in the UK, Germany and Italy.

Through its number of well known brands Direct Line Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include; Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. It also offers insurance services for third party brands through its Partnerships division. In the commercial sector, its NIG and Direct Line for Business operations provide insurance products for businesses via brokers or direct respectively.

In addition to insurance services, Direct Line Group continues to provide support and reassurance to millions of UK motorists through its Green Flag breakdown recovery service and TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery and telematics business.

Campaigning for safe cycling

Winn Solicitors is pleased to support Brake. Visit our site>

cycle4life_8More than 16,000 people are killed or injured while cycling on Britain’s roads each year. Brake wants to encourage you, through this site, to help us campaign for increased awareness of the dangers faced by cyclists, safer facilities for cyclists, and slower traffic. You can make a difference and save lives!

You can make a difference! here’s how


<< Cycle For Life home page

 

 

 

 

 This page is kindly supported by:

Winn solicitors

Carrying Pre-Schoolers

cycle4life_7There is a huge range of products on the market designed to transport children by bike, from front and rear-mounted child seats, to trailers, tag-alongs and tow bars. Which is the best for you depends on: your own experience and fitness; number of children; size, age of children; route choice and surface; traffic levels and danger; distance you are planning to ride. If you can, try before you buy. Most cycle hire centres stock a variety of bikes and child-seat accessories that you can test out with your children.

Be aware that child carriers increase the size of your bike, alter the balance of your bike and can make manoeuvring more challenging. Child seats on bikes aren’t safety seats with crash protection, and uncovered seats offer no protection from the elements either - a child who is not pedalling can get very cold or sunburnt so ensure they are well wrapped up / have suncream on. Trailers place your child at the level of vehicles’ wheels and exhaust fumes, and Brake consequently does not recommend they are used on roads. They can be great on off-road, well surfaced cycle trails.

Useful links reviewing cycle child carriers:
Why Cycle
London Cycling Campaign


Teaching young children to ride >>

<< Cycling with kids

<< Family cycling home page

<< Cycle4life home page

 

 

Charity calls for safer streets for families, as survey reveals walking and cycling worries

Friday 26 September 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

The charity Brake and Churchill Insurance are appealing for safer streets for families, as their survey out today finds two thirds (64%) of the driving public think local roads are at least partially unsafe for families to walk and cycle. The findings come as thousands of tots across the country gear up to take part in Brake and Churchill's national road safety project for nurseries and pre-schools, Beep Beep! Day, as part of a campaign to save little lives.

Brake and Churchill's survey of 1,000 drivers also finds:

  • Almost one in six (16%) have had a near miss with someone on foot or bike in the past 12 months;
  • More than three in five (62%) themselves worry about being hit by traffic when they're on foot in their area.

As thousands of youngsters start learning about the risks on roads, Brake and Churchill are issuing an appeal to drivers to realise that children's safety is in their hands and join their movement to save little lives. In particular, they are highlighting that drivers can make a huge difference to the safety of families on foot and bike by slowing down to 20mph around nurseries, homes, schools and shops.

Beep Beep! Days involve children aged two to seven at pre-schools, nurseries, and children's centres learning the road safety basics through fun activities, and raising awareness among parents and drivers about keeping kids safe, using advice and resources from Brake. Most Beep Beep! Days happen in the autumn, and more than 32,500 children are registered to take part over the coming months. Nurseries can find out more and register at www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday

Concerns about family road safety are justified: traffic is the second biggest killer of children in the UK, and the biggest non-medical killer [1]. In 2013, 48 children were killed and 1,932 seriously injured on UK roads: that's five under-16s seriously hurt or killed each day [2]. The overwhelming majority of children killed or seriously injured on roads (83%) are on foot or bike [3].

As well as calling on drivers to slow down to help protect families, Brake is also campaigning for a safer road environment for kids and adults on foot and bike through its GO 20 campaign.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "It's vital we make our roads safer for families and people of all ages to walk and cycle, and drivers can help bring this about. It is unacceptable that five children are seriously injured or killed each day on our roads, and it is unacceptable to deny any child a healthy, active upbringing because of local dangers. Our survey reveals that drivers acknowledge the risks families face on roads – but we also need drivers to realise the difference they personally can made, and always drive as though a child could run out unexpectedly. As thousands of tots gear up to take part in a Beep Beep! Day this autumn, to start learning about dangers on roads, we're appealing to drivers everywhere to help reduce those dangers: slow down to 20mph in communities to help save little lives. We're also urging more pre-schools and nursery to register to be part of this important project."

Gus Park, director of Churchill Car Insurance, said: "We are very proud to be supporting Beep Beep! Day once again this year. Too many children die or are seriously injured on our roads each day. Beep Beep! Day is a great way of starting to educate young children on road safety, as well as raising awareness among drivers, including parents and grandparents, of the need to drive with extreme care when young children are about."

REGISTER! Nurseries, playgroups, childminders, infant schools and children's centres can sign up now to run a Beep Beep! Day and receive a FREE bumper resource pack, including posters, stickers and activity ideas. Go to www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday, call 01484 550061 or email beepbeep@brake.org.uk

About Beep Beep! Day
In 2013, 27,000 children took part in a Beep Beep! Day. Nurseries, playgroups, children's centres and childminders can run a Beep Beep! Day on whatever day is best for them, although most take place during the autumn, including many in Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014). Nurseries receive a pack of resources to help them run road safety activities and promote road safety to parents and the community.

Beep Beep! Days involve activities such as creating a poster of hand prints saying 'We hold hands', experimenting with toy cars to learn the words stop and go, and singing road safety songs. Activities are designed to help children to start understanding road safety, and to emphasise to parents and other adults their responsibilities in protecting children.

Sponsorship raised by children taking part helps Brake provide support services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes and run community road safety campaigns.

Advice for parents
When your child starts to walk with you around your community, talk to them about how they must always hold your hand. If your child is likely to pull away from you, use safety reins or a wrist strap. Hold hands until your child is at least eight, or longer depending on their development.

Make sure they understand the meaning of stop, traffic, danger, look, listen, walk don't run, and other key words. Encourage your child's nursery or playgroup to teach road safety through a Beep Beep! Day. Your child's learning will be more effective if they are taught about road safety at school as well as at home.

Full results
These results, released today (Thursday 11 September 2014), are from a survey of 1,000 drivers conducted by Surveygoo.

Q1. Do you think families in your local area are able to walk and cycle without being endangered by fast traffic?

  • Yes - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 36%
  • Partly - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in some parts of the local area: 57%
  • No - it is not safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 7%

Q2. In the past 12 months, have you had a near miss or collision with a pedestrian or cyclist, including where you've had to stop or swerve suddenly?

  • I have not hit someone, but I have had at least one near-miss: 13% (18% male, 10% female)
  • I bumped into someone but they weren't hurt: 2% (3% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they suffered minor injuries: 1% (1% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they had to go to hospital, but recovered: 0%
  • I hit someone and they suffered serious or long-term injury: 0%
  • I've been hit while on foot or bicycle myself: 3% (4% male, 3% female)
  • No, never: 82% (75% male, 86% female)

Q3. When you are on foot in your area, do you ever worry about being hit by traffic?

  • I worry every time I walk in my area: 4%
  • I worry often, but not every time: 10%
  • I worry occasionally: 48%
  • I never worry when walking: 34%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - it is too dangerous: 1%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - for other reasons: 3%

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Churchill
Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Churchill and UK Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc.
Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0800 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com

End notes
[1] Death registrations in England and Wales: table 2: deaths by age, sex and underlying cause, 2013 registrations, Office for National Statistics, 2014
[2] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 report, Department for Transport, 2014
[3] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 tables (table RAS30002), Department for Transport, 2014

Charity calls on employers: take advantage of technology to protect pedestrians and cyclists

Thursday 28 May 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

A report released today (28 May 2015) by Brake, the road safety charity, and Licence Bureau, has found many employers with vehicle fleets are not taking advantage of new technologies to protect vulnerable road users. Despite the potential to help drivers see pedestrians and cyclists and reduce casualties, only one in five HGV operators surveyed (20%) have rear-facing cameras on all vehicles, one in 12 (8%) have side-facing cameras on all vehicles, and one in eight (12%) have side sensors on all vehicles.

Brake is appealing to employers to follow best practice advice and implement the latest safety technology suitable for their vehicles, to protect other road users and deliver the business benefits of reduced crashes, bumps and scrapes and lower insurance premiums.

The report found HGV safety technologies that are mandatory under European law, such as underrun protection and wide-angle lenses, are present on almost all vehicles. Hence Brake is calling for more comprehensive regulation to ensure the widespread take up of technologies such as automatically moving mirrors, side-view cameras and side sensors, which can be of benefit in preventing needless death and injuries yet are currently only present on a minority of vehicle fleets.

With at least a quarter (24%) of road deaths and serious injuries involving a vehicle being driven for work [1], there is a clear need for employers to do more to improve the safety of their vehicles. HGVs specifically make up only 5% of vehicles on UK roads, yet are involved in a quarter (23%) of cyclist deaths and one in seven (13%) of pedestrian deaths. In 2013, 78 people on foot or bike were killed by HGVs.

The report also indicates that while safety management technologies such as telematics are becoming widespread, there is scope for employers with fleets of all vehicle types to make far greater use of them. Half of operators surveyed (49%) do not use telematics at all, and many of those who do report not making full use of their systems. Brake is highlighting that while there is an initial cost for such measures, effective safety technology like telematics pays for itself through reduced incidents and insurance premiums: many report recouping costs within a year and seeing long-term gains.

The report also highlighted the negative impact of certain forms of technology, particularly the worrying prevalence of hands-free mobile phone kits in employer vehicles. Hands-free kits were present in some, most or all vehicles in two thirds (68%) of HGV fleets and four in five (80%) cars fleets surveyed. Only 4% of employers make use of apps that prevent mobile phone use behind the wheel. Brake warns that using a mobile at the wheel, even with a hands-free kit, has a similar effect on reactions to drink driving [3], and makes you four times more likely to be in a crash that causes injury [4].

Employers can access Brake’s expert guidance by ordering a copy of the report, which includes advice for companies, and becoming a member of Brake Professional at http://www.brakepro.org/survey2015pt1

Dr Tom Fisher, senior research and communications officer at Brake, said: “Employers whose staff drive for work have a duty of care both to their own employees and other road users. While not a panacea, technology can play a big part in helping them improve safety and exercise that duty, so it is disappointing to see that so many are not taking full advantage of new safety technologies on offer. Blind spot devices and safety management kit like telematics have huge potential to reduce crashes and casualties, and bring down associated costs for the operator. Brake urges all fleet operators to go beyond the bare legal minimum to ensure their vehicles and drivers are as safe as possible, especially in safeguarding our most vulnerable road users. We can offer support and advice, through our Brake Professionals scheme, on how best to do this. Brake is also urging government to put in place more comprehensive minimum safety standards, as it is clear this is the most effective way to ensure the widespread adoption of vital safety technologies.”

Les Owen, compliance consultant at Licence Bureau, said: “The Brake survey provides fleet operators with lots of good data and advice. Surely it is obvious that the cost of a crash (average in the UK is over £800 for all vehicles) makes it sensible to consider fitting some of the safety technology items. The key features for fleets must be to avoid drivers using mobile phones; telematics to provide fleet managers with data they can sample (rather than look at every one) to offer driving advice where needed; and safety standard mirrors with items for HGVs to reduce risks to vulnerable road users. One serious crash or fatal collision can lead to a lifetime of problems for drivers and managers alike so doing more to avoid them is a no-brainer. Finally, implementing good policies, which are reviewed with drivers to provide learning opportunities and reminders of company objectives, is good practice. Writing a policy and not doing anything with it is just as bad as not having one.”

Brake’s advice for employers

Technology alone is not a panacea for road safety; safe driver behaviour and risk management policies and procedures are essential within fleets. Yet technology can form a vital part of the road risk management mix, and greatly aid safe driving, vehicles and journeys.

Fleet operators should be aware of and comply with laws to help protect vulnerable road users. Under EU law, trucks weighing more than 3.5 tonnes are legally required to have some safety devices fitted, including extra mirrors and under-run guards. Similar requirements exist in many other jurisdictions worldwide.

Where safety devices are not legally required, fleet managers should still consider fitting them to ensure their vehicles are as safe as possible.

Wide-angle and blind spot mirrors, CCTV, rear, front and side sensors, automatic side mirrors, and reversing alarms are available for various types of vehicle. Fleet operators should implement devices suitable to their vehicle types.

When selecting vehicles to lease or buy, or advising employees who use their own vehicles for work, fleet managers should select vehicles with smaller blind spots or blind spot-minimising technology fitted, and features designed to minimise the harm to vulnerable road users in a collision.

Fleet managers should keep up-to-date with the latest technology in this fast-moving area, and implement new technologies where available and appropriate. Information on the latest research and developments is available through Brake’s fortnightly Target Zero email newsletter tosubscribers, and in Brake’sresearch library.

Brake’s survey report gives further guidance and information on technology. Employers can order the report at http://www.brakepro.org/survey2015pt1.

Brake advises and supports companies to manage their road risk through itsBrake Professionals scheme. The survey report is available for free tomembers, or can be purchased for £5 by non-members. Special offer: the first 25 non-members to request the report through ouronline form get a copy for FREE.

About the report

The survey results come from Brake and Licence Bureau’s Fleet Safety Survey Report Part One: Technology, released today (Thursday 28 May 2015). 131 organisations that employ drivers completed the online survey, representing nearly 26,000 vehicles and 40,000 people driving for work.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on Twitter or Facebook. Follow Julie Townsend on Twitter.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014

[2] Ibid

[3]Using a hands-free mobile whilst driving can be more dangerous than drink driving, Transport Research Laboratory, 2009

[4]Role of mobile phones in motor vehicle crashes resulting in hospital attendance: a case-crossover study, University of Western Australia, 2005