Articles Tagged ‘walk - Brake the road safety charity’

Brake comments as 3 in 5 adults feel it is too dangerous to cycle on the roads

News from Brake
Wednesday 31 July 2019
 
3 in 5 adults in England feel that it is too dangerous for them to cycle on the roads, according to statistics published by the Department for Transport today.
 
The National Travel Attitude Survey found that 61% of adults aged 18+ in England agreed that “it is too dangerous for me to cycle on the roads”. The survey also revealed that Women were more likely than men to agree (68% to 54%) and people were just as likely to agree if they were aged 25-34 as they were aged 65 and older. Cyclists were less likely to believe that cycling was too dangerous for them than non-cyclists (50% to 65%).
 
Road safety charity, Brake, believe that these findings reveal just how much work needs to be done to convince people that it is safe to cycle on the roads, and have called for further action from the Government.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake said:
 
“Cycling is one of the healthiest and cheapest ways to get around and everyone should be able to cycle every day without fear for their own safety. Yet these findings reveal that most adults just don’t think its safe to cycle on our roads and more is clearly needed to be done to convince them otherwise.
 
“Whilst the Government’s actions to encourage more people to cycle and keep them safe are welcome, they must go further. We need slower, safer speed limits, greater investment in segregated cycle lanes and drivers who behave dangerously removed from our roads.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:
 

Brake launches ‘Drive less, live more’ interactive resource to reduce car journeys and make streets safer in the run up to Road Safety Week

Wednesday 4th November
Contact e:
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity, has produced a free interactive resource in the lead up to Road Safety Week 23–29 November 2015, with the theme'Drive less, live more'. Developed in partnership with AIG and Specsavers, the resource encourages everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by reducing car journeys and walking, cycling or using public transport instead.

Every day five people die on UK roads, and over 60 are seriously injured – resulting in needless devastation, trauma and suffering1. The vast majority of casualties are down to driver error. Road safety isn’t just about driving safely and legally or using the green cross code, although these are crucial. It’s about doing what we can to protect ourselves and the people around us to make our streets safer. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all.

Many people walk the few metres from their front door to the car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A shocking four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles2. Brake is asking everyone this Road Safety Week to consider how they use roads, and pledge to leave their car at home, at least for some journeys.

Walking, cycling or using public transport not only makes our streets safer by reducing traffic danger, but has personal benefits too. It can save money in car costs; help people live more active lives; reduce stress and illness; reinvigorate communities; and cut congestion and pollution.

The open-access‘Drive less, live more’ resource can be used to facilitate discussion about the importance of driving less. It can be used by anyone who works with drivers, including: fleet professionals and employers; driving instructors; road safety professionals and emergency services; teachers; community leaders; and by individuals directly wanting to see how they can help themselves and their community by driving less. Brake is especially encouraging families to use theDrive less, live more resource to reduce school-run and commuter traffic, and asking businesses to manage at-work journeys.

Access the resource online now atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessinteractive.

Gary Rae, Director of Communications and Campaigns, said: Our new ‘Drive less, live more’ e-learning resource shows people the benefits of walking, cycling or taking public transport, particularly for shorter journeys. The resource is a powerful tool that shows that by driving less, you can improve road safety and prevent casualties, become more active, and protect the planet. The resource is freely available to road safety practitioners, employers, driving instructors and educators to help them raise awareness of the benefits of active and sustainable transport.”

The facts

By 2035 the number of cars on England’s roads is set to increase by 45% and traffic delays by 64%3.

Four in 10 car journeys are less than two miles – short enough to replace with a pleasant walk or cycle ride. Currently, one in five cars on the road during the morning rush-hour is doing the school run. Half of our children are driven to school4, even though the average school run for primary schools is just 1.5 miles5.

One in four adults in England is obese and a further 37% are overweight6. The cost to the NHS of people being overweight is estimated at £4.2 billion per year7. Incorporating activity like walking and cycling into everyday life is effective for losing weight8, and can help guard against serious illnesses such as asthma, depression, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and some cancers9.

Commuting by public transport can also improve overall fitness. People who take the bus or train to work instead of driving have been shown to have a lower BMI and a healthier bodyweight10.

Nearly half of households in England could be struggling with car-ownership costs11. Driving less can save money: for example, a family can save £642 per year by swapping a car-based school run for walking or cycling12.

Groups can register to take part atwww.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Road Safety Week

Road Safety Week is the UK’s flagship event to promote safer road use, coordinated annually by the charity Brake and involving thousands of schools, communities and organisations across the country. Road Safety Week 2015 takes place 23-29 November, with support from the Department for Transport and headline sponsors Specsavers and AIG.

The theme of Road Safety Week 2015, 23-29 November, is about making our roads and communities safer, happier places for everyone, by encouraging people to‘Drive less, live more’.

Brake has been running this successful event for 17 years, growing its reach and impact. We now share our experience globally atwww.roadsafetyweek.org, to help others run Road Safety Weeks and similar events in other countries.

Five people die every day on UK roads and around 60 are seriously injured. Brake’s priority is tackling these devastating tragedies, and making our streets safe for people to use without fear or threat. Reducing traffic is an important part of this.

Brake’s main aim through this November’s Road Safety Week is to help people consider the options open to them, and better understand the benefits of driving less, to road safety, health, personal finances, communities and the planet.

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through nationalcampaigns,community education,services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November,Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider ofsupport to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs. Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK andNew Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or the BrakeBlog.


Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Reported road casualties in Great Britain 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

[2] National Travel Survey, Department for Transport, 2010

[3] Road Transport Forecasts 2011, Department for Transport, 2011

[4] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[5] Transport: Social Trends 41, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[6] Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England, 2013 NHS, 2013

[7] Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, et al., ‘Tackling obesities: future choices – project report (2nd Ed)’, Foresight Programme of the Government Office for Science, 2007

[8] Start Active, Stay Active: a Report on Physical Activity from the Four Home Countries’ Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, 2011

[9] NHShttp://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx, 2015

[10] Flint Ellen, Cummins Steven, Sacker Amanda, ‘Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index:  population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom’, BMJ 349 :g4887, 2014

[11] Locked Out: Transport poverty in England, Sustrans, 2012

[12] Estimate by Sustrans based on figures from the AA, DfE school statistics, DfT National Travel Survey, DEFRA & DECC GHG conversion factors and the Bike Station, June 2014

Brake's Kids Walk

ZAK STRIPES FOR 6 TWITTER 2 1

Stripes for 6 is a fun road safety challenge for children and their families.
Complete 6 challenges in 6 days for a £6 donation for the 6 kids that are killed or seriously injured every day on roads.
You can take part in Stripes for 6 at any time, at home or in school.
 
A small donation of £6 to Brake will help us support families affected by road crashes and campaign for safe and healthy journeys for everyone. Please make your donation on day one, and post your activity daily on social media to encourage other families to take part and donate.
 
Click here to find out more.

 

zebras slider

Schools and childcare looks very different for all of us at the moment due to COVID-19. Visit BrakeZebras.org for films, games, lessons, coloring sheets and lots more free, great activities for children.

We are sharing these resources for free but ask everyone who signs up to please consider making a donation or do some fun fundraising activity for Brake. This will help us create more fun, educational resources to help children, families and teachers learn about safe and healthy mobility, as well as helping our vital work supporting people affected by road death and serious injury.

Click here for fundraising at home ideas.
Click here for ways to donate to Brake.

 

BKW StS slider brakehome

Unfortunately Brake's Kids Walk 2020 has been cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

In light of the recent school closures, and to ensure that everyone taking part is kept safe, we have taken the decision to not run this year's event.

To register your interest for 2021 click here.


Find out what primary schools have done before:
 

Cambridge MP wins prestigious award for outstanding contribution to road safety

15 January 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, has been given a prestigious national award for his successful campaign for widespread 20mph limits in his Cambridge constituency, to make roads safer and encourage more people to walk and cycle.

Julian received the 'Parliamentarian of the Year: Community Campaigner' award at road safety charity Brake's annual reception at the Houses of Parliament last night, sponsored by Direct Line Group (photo attached).

Julian's campaigning for safer roads for walking and cycling spans back to 2006, when as leader of the Liberal Democrats in Cambridgeshire County Council, he demanded the council reconsider its negative position on 20mph limits in light of Portsmouth's decision to implement widespread 20mph limits. After three years of campaigning, the council agreed to trial 20mph limits in small areas of Cambridge city centre.

In 2010, Julian led a committee of MPs, the All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Group (which he later joined as an MP), on a tour of Cambridge to show them the benefits of 20mph limits for cyclists. Shortly after this, Julian was elected as MP for Cambridge, and once again took up the mantle of campaigning for safer streets. He began calling for widespread 20mph limits across Cambridge, to make the entire city safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

In March 2013, Cambridge City Council announced it will implement 20mph limits on most residential and shopping streets, which will be phased in from January 2014. Read about the Council's plans.

Julian has been a vocal advocate of 20mph limits in the media as well as in Parliament, as co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cycling. The group's Get Britain Cycling report, published in 2013, called for 20mph limits to become the default on urban streets alongside a host of other measures to make streets safer and encourage greater levels of cycling.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, the road safety charity, said: "Brake believes everyone has the right to walk or cycle safely, without fear from fast traffic, and we know that 20mph limits are a critical step towards this. By speaking out for walking and cycling, successfully campaigning for widespread 20mph limits in Cambridge, and raising awareness in media and Parliament about the benefits, Julian has brought this vision a little closer. We're delighted to be giving Julian recognition for his dedication to making streets safer for people to walk and cycle in Cambridge and the rest of the UK."

Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, said: "I am delighted and honoured to have won this award from Brake. We do need to make roads much safer for people to walk and cycle, and 20mph limits will help to do that. I am really pleased that Cambridge City Council has taken such bold steps to make sure this becomes a reality."

Tim Ward, Cambridge City Executive Councillor for Planning and Transport, said: "A city-wide 20mph scheme has many potential benefits, including reducing the number of crashes, reducing congestion, and improving people's health as they feel more confident to cycle and to let their children cycle. Large scale 20mph schemes are the most cost-effective way of getting more people to cycle; the total cost of the Cambridge scheme is similar to that of re-designing one major road junction. Local residents have campaigned for years for small 20mph schemes, so I thought it best to meet this and future demand by implementing 20mph limits in residential streets across the whole city, which will work out cheaper than doing a handful of streets at a time."

Read about Brake's GO 20 campaign, calling for 20mph limits to be the norm in our cities, towns and villages.

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Direct Line Insurance Group plc (Direct Line Group) is headquartered in Bromley, Kent; it has operations in the UK, Germany and Italy.

Through its number of well known brands Direct Line Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include; Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. It also offers insurance services for third party brands through its Partnerships division. In the commercial sector, its NIG and Direct Line for Business operations provide insurance products for businesses via brokers or direct respectively.

In addition to insurance services, Direct Line Group continues to provide support and reassurance to millions of UK motorists through its Green Flag breakdown recovery service and TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery and telematics business.

Charity calls for safer streets for families, as survey reveals walking and cycling worries

Friday 26 September 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

The charity Brake and Churchill Insurance are appealing for safer streets for families, as their survey out today finds two thirds (64%) of the driving public think local roads are at least partially unsafe for families to walk and cycle. The findings come as thousands of tots across the country gear up to take part in Brake and Churchill's national road safety project for nurseries and pre-schools, Beep Beep! Day, as part of a campaign to save little lives.

Brake and Churchill's survey of 1,000 drivers also finds:

  • Almost one in six (16%) have had a near miss with someone on foot or bike in the past 12 months;
  • More than three in five (62%) themselves worry about being hit by traffic when they're on foot in their area.

As thousands of youngsters start learning about the risks on roads, Brake and Churchill are issuing an appeal to drivers to realise that children's safety is in their hands and join their movement to save little lives. In particular, they are highlighting that drivers can make a huge difference to the safety of families on foot and bike by slowing down to 20mph around nurseries, homes, schools and shops.

Beep Beep! Days involve children aged two to seven at pre-schools, nurseries, and children's centres learning the road safety basics through fun activities, and raising awareness among parents and drivers about keeping kids safe, using advice and resources from Brake. Most Beep Beep! Days happen in the autumn, and more than 32,500 children are registered to take part over the coming months. Nurseries can find out more and register at www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday

Concerns about family road safety are justified: traffic is the second biggest killer of children in the UK, and the biggest non-medical killer [1]. In 2013, 48 children were killed and 1,932 seriously injured on UK roads: that's five under-16s seriously hurt or killed each day [2]. The overwhelming majority of children killed or seriously injured on roads (83%) are on foot or bike [3].

As well as calling on drivers to slow down to help protect families, Brake is also campaigning for a safer road environment for kids and adults on foot and bike through its GO 20 campaign.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said: "It's vital we make our roads safer for families and people of all ages to walk and cycle, and drivers can help bring this about. It is unacceptable that five children are seriously injured or killed each day on our roads, and it is unacceptable to deny any child a healthy, active upbringing because of local dangers. Our survey reveals that drivers acknowledge the risks families face on roads – but we also need drivers to realise the difference they personally can made, and always drive as though a child could run out unexpectedly. As thousands of tots gear up to take part in a Beep Beep! Day this autumn, to start learning about dangers on roads, we're appealing to drivers everywhere to help reduce those dangers: slow down to 20mph in communities to help save little lives. We're also urging more pre-schools and nursery to register to be part of this important project."

Gus Park, director of Churchill Car Insurance, said: "We are very proud to be supporting Beep Beep! Day once again this year. Too many children die or are seriously injured on our roads each day. Beep Beep! Day is a great way of starting to educate young children on road safety, as well as raising awareness among drivers, including parents and grandparents, of the need to drive with extreme care when young children are about."

REGISTER! Nurseries, playgroups, childminders, infant schools and children's centres can sign up now to run a Beep Beep! Day and receive a FREE bumper resource pack, including posters, stickers and activity ideas. Go to www.brake.org.uk/beepbeepday, call 01484 550061 or email beepbeep@brake.org.uk

About Beep Beep! Day
In 2013, 27,000 children took part in a Beep Beep! Day. Nurseries, playgroups, children's centres and childminders can run a Beep Beep! Day on whatever day is best for them, although most take place during the autumn, including many in Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014). Nurseries receive a pack of resources to help them run road safety activities and promote road safety to parents and the community.

Beep Beep! Days involve activities such as creating a poster of hand prints saying 'We hold hands', experimenting with toy cars to learn the words stop and go, and singing road safety songs. Activities are designed to help children to start understanding road safety, and to emphasise to parents and other adults their responsibilities in protecting children.

Sponsorship raised by children taking part helps Brake provide support services for families bereaved and injured by road crashes and run community road safety campaigns.

Advice for parents
When your child starts to walk with you around your community, talk to them about how they must always hold your hand. If your child is likely to pull away from you, use safety reins or a wrist strap. Hold hands until your child is at least eight, or longer depending on their development.

Make sure they understand the meaning of stop, traffic, danger, look, listen, walk don't run, and other key words. Encourage your child's nursery or playgroup to teach road safety through a Beep Beep! Day. Your child's learning will be more effective if they are taught about road safety at school as well as at home.

Full results
These results, released today (Thursday 11 September 2014), are from a survey of 1,000 drivers conducted by Surveygoo.

Q1. Do you think families in your local area are able to walk and cycle without being endangered by fast traffic?

  • Yes - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 36%
  • Partly - it is safe for families to walk and cycle in some parts of the local area: 57%
  • No - it is not safe for families to walk and cycle in most or all of the local area: 7%

Q2. In the past 12 months, have you had a near miss or collision with a pedestrian or cyclist, including where you've had to stop or swerve suddenly?

  • I have not hit someone, but I have had at least one near-miss: 13% (18% male, 10% female)
  • I bumped into someone but they weren't hurt: 2% (3% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they suffered minor injuries: 1% (1% male, 1% female)
  • I hit someone and they had to go to hospital, but recovered: 0%
  • I hit someone and they suffered serious or long-term injury: 0%
  • I've been hit while on foot or bicycle myself: 3% (4% male, 3% female)
  • No, never: 82% (75% male, 86% female)

Q3. When you are on foot in your area, do you ever worry about being hit by traffic?

  • I worry every time I walk in my area: 4%
  • I worry often, but not every time: 10%
  • I worry occasionally: 48%
  • I never worry when walking: 34%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - it is too dangerous: 1%
  • I never/hardly ever walk in my area - for other reasons: 3%

Brake
Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Churchill
Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. U K Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority.

Churchill and UK Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc.
Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0800 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com

End notes
[1] Death registrations in England and Wales: table 2: deaths by age, sex and underlying cause, 2013 registrations, Office for National Statistics, 2014
[2] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 report, Department for Transport, 2014
[3] Reported road casualties in Great Britain: main results 2013 tables (table RAS30002), Department for Transport, 2014

Drive less, plant more - Brake backs Earth Day with call to make sustainable travel choices

News from Brake

21 April 2016
news@brake.org.uk

Brake, the road safety charity is calling on people to support world Earth Day on 22 April 2016 by making sustainable travel choices.

The theme of this year’s Earth Day is “plant a tree” to help combat climate change, as trees absorb excess and harmful CO2 from our atmosphere. But it takes an acre of mature trees to absorb the CO2 produced by just one average car in a single year being driven around 26,000 miles. That’s why Brake is encouraging people to plant trees and also to consider if their journeys can be walked or cycled or taken on public transport instead to help protect our environment.

Road safety is more than driving safely and legally, it’s about making our streets safe and pleasant for everyone to use freely, and doing everything we can to protect ourselves, our environment, and people around us. A big part of that is driving less, as little as possible, or not at all if you can. It’s common for people to habitually walk the few metres from their front door to their car and drive, even if they’re only going round the corner. A quarter of car journeys (23%) are less than two miles[1] . People who walk or cycle often have to face busy, noisy streets, full of pollution and fast traffic.

Brake has produced an interactive map so people can see just how much of a problem CO2 is where they live and how many deaths are being caused in their area by air pollution: http://www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk/drivelessmap/

Earth Day is now in its 46th year and aims to plant 7.8 billion trees before its 50th anniversary.

Alice Bailey communications and campaigns adviser for Brake, the road safety charity, said: “From our work with bereaved relatives we see the devastation caused by car crashes, but there is more than one way a vehicle can kill you. Emissions from cars are now a serious concern with many major cities already breaching their yearly air quality limits in a matter of weeks or months. The World Health Organisation is describing air quality as a public health emergency. We want everyone to get behind Earth Day and plant a tree AND also think about how they travel and whether journeys can be made by foot, bike or on public transport to help keep our planet greener, cleaner and healthier.”

About Earth Day

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act and many other ground breaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world. It is now run by Earth Day Network.

[1] National Travel Survey 2014, Department for Transport, 2015

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

Government red tape puts brakes on 20mph limits

Wednesday 30 September 2015

Brake, the road safety charity

news@brake.org.uk
 

Stronger national leadership needed to unlock full potential, report finds

A research report released today (30 September 2015) by Brake, the road safety charity, has called for the removal of unnecessary barriers faced by local councils in implementing 20mph speed limits to deliver safer walking and cycling. The report finds that moving to 20mph limits across built up areas would deliver significant safety benefits, especially for pedestrians and cyclists, and suggests red tape and a lack of strong national government leadership is at fault for the current UK postcode lottery when it comes to reaping the benefits of lower traffic speeds in communities.

A freedom of information request submitted by Brake to all 206 local traffic authorities in Great Britain regarding their decisions to implement 20mph limits or not identified some key stumbling blocks, including:

  • Cost. With local authority budgets under severe pressure, many councils view the cost of introducing 20mph limits as prohibitive, with much of the costs (75% in one case) spent on installing repeater signs in line with current regulation. Although many councils recognise this cost is likely to be outweighed in the long run by crash prevention, it is enough to discourage some councils. The government could reduce these costs by amending signage regulation.
  • Central government guidance. The government’s guidance on introducing 20mph limits states trouble-free compliance is likely on roads where average traffic speeds are already 24mph or below [1]. This has been misinterpreted by some councils as meaning 20mph limits should not be introduced on roads with higher average speeds, when doing so has been shown to achieve greater speed reductions. Brake argues the government can show stronger leadership and remove red tape by revising guidance to be less prohibitive.

With 20mph increasingly the norm in urban areas across the UK, Brake advocates making this the national default urban speed limit, alongside its 16 GO 20 coalition partners. This would avoid problems currently experienced by local authorities by only requiring them to spend money signing exceptional roads that are appropriate to remain at 30mph or higher. This would also be easier for drivers to understand and would likely increase compliance and speed reduction.

However, short of changing the urban default, Brake is recommending that major progress could be made in making walking and cycling safer, and big savings achieved, by relaxing regulations on repeater signs on 20mph roads and revising government guidance on setting local speed limits.

Small margins make a big difference

Reaffirming the wide-ranging benefits of 20mph limits, the report found that signs-only 20mph speed limits can be expected to achieve, as a minimum, a 1mph reduction of average traffic speeds, leading to a 6% reduction in collisions. Where limits are backed up with public awareness and enforcement campaigns, speed reductions could be as much as 4mph, reducing collisions by almost a quarter (24%). The report suggests this improvement in safety is likely to have a positive impact on walking and cycling levels, with significant health and environmental benefits.

Dr Tom Fisher, research manager for Brake, said: “At a time when local authority budgets are being slashed by central government, that government has a duty to do what it can to enable those authorities to spend that cash as efficiently as possible. However, when it comes to making streets in their communities safer, the government is tying the hands of cash-strapped councils with out-dated and unnecessary regulation.

“20mph limits are an effective and globally-recognised solution to unacceptably dangerous roads in our cities, towns, and villages. Ultimately, we would like to see 20mph become the default urban speed limit in the UK. In the meantime, the government can remove red tape and show stronger leadership by providing clearer and more positive guidance, and by doing away with the requirement for costly repeater signs.”

About Brake’s GO 20 campaign

Brake is part of a broad coalition of organisations calling for more local authorities to adopt widespread 20mph limits, and for the government to make 20mph the national urban default, through its GO 20 campaignTweet us: @Brakecharity, hashtag #GO20.

Why GO 20?

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have far more time to react in an emergency. Studies show when 20 limits replace 30, there are fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [2].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [3].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution: If more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [4]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [5]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [6]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

Notes for editors

About the report

GO 20: Towards changing the default urban speed limit to 20mph was produced by Brake, the road safety charity, in autumn 2015, with kind sponsorship from Bridgestone. The report is divided into two sections: a literature review exploring current evidence on 20mph limits and their effects, and results of a freedom of information request to local authorities exploring their implementation and experiences of 20mph limits. 122 of 206 local authorities in Great Britain provided a response. Read the full report.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, orThe Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1]Department for Transport circular 01/2013: setting local speed limits, Department for Transport, 2013

[2] For example, 20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001;  20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010

[3] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20% Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012

[4] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion. At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004

[5] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

[6] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used the World Health Organisation’s Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling. Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012.  Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, the effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy. Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012

Increase in road casualties should be wake up call for politicians, says charity

Thursday 5 February 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

Road safety charity Brake has expressed dismay at an increase in road casualties announced today, and is calling on all political parties to commit to three vital road safety policies, especially to protect pedestrians, cyclists, children and young people. The figures show that deaths and serious injuries on UK roads increased by 4% in the year ending September 2014, with deaths up by 1%.

In total, 1,730 people were killed and 22,630 seriously injured on UK roads in the year ending September 2014, up from 1,711 deaths and 21,728 serious injuries in the previous year. Casualties of all severities are also up by 5%, from 184,087 to 192,910.

Casualties are up for all types of road user, with child and cyclist casualties of particular concern:

  • Child deaths and serious injuries are up by 3% to 2,060, with casualties of all severities up by 6% to 16,640 – the first rise in rolling year comparisons for 20 years.
  • Cyclist deaths and serious injuries are up 8% to 3,500.

Brake is calling on all political parties to make three, key general election manifesto commitments to get casualties falling again and enable everyone to get around safely, sustainably and actively:

  • Change the default urban speed limit to 20mph to protect people on foot and bike, and allow everyone to walk and cycle without fear. Read about the GO 20 campaign.
  • Introduce graduated driver licensing, to allow new drivers to build skills and experience gradually while exposed to less danger. Read about the too young to die campaign.
  • Introduce a zero-tolerance drink drive limit of 20mg per 100ml of blood, to stamp out the menace of drink driving once and for all. Read about the not a drop, not a drag campaign.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“These casualty increases are the tragic result of a failure of ambition. They come on the back of three years of flat-lining road death and serious injury figures, during which the government congratulated itself on having ‘some of the safest roads in the world’, rather than making forward thinking decisions and setting targets to secure further reductions. We need a commitment to a long-term vision of nobody being killed or seriously injured on our roads, rather than settling for the status quo. Every road casualty causes appalling suffering, and every one can be prevented, but only if we make the right moves.

“Global research and experience clearly points to the policies that prevent road casualties and the resultant suffering, and enable people to get around through healthy and sustainable means. Based on this evidence, we’re appealing to all political parties to include three key life-saving measures in manifestos: graduated driver licensing, a 20mph default urban speed limit, and a zero-tolerance drink drive limit. We’re in no doubt these measures would put us back on the path of stopping needless loss of life on our roads, and creating safer streets and communities for all.”

Brake provides support for people bereaved and injured in road crashes. Find out more atwww.brake.org.uk/support.

Notes for editors

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Introduction to school crossing patrols

Key facts

  • Between 2010 and 2014, there was a cut in numbers of lollipop people of at least 992 [1];
  • 46% of children aged five to 10 years, and 38% of those aged 11 to 16, walk to school, although these numbers are in decline as more and more children are driven to school [2];
  • In 2015, 1,283 children on foot were killed or seriously injured on Great Britain’s roads [3], 511 of these in the morning or evening of a school-day [4]

Introduction

School crossing patrols (or lollipop people) provide a vital service by helping children cross roads safely on their way to school as part of a broader provision of safe crossing facilities by local authorities. Yet lollipop people numbers are declining: between 2010 and 2014, there was a cut in numbers of lollipop people of at least 992 [5].

46% of children aged five to 10 years, and 38% of those aged 11 to 16, walk to school, although these numbers are in decline as more and more children are driven to school [6]. The danger on our roads discourages parents from choosing to let their children walk or cycle to school. Even though the numbers of children killed on our roads is decline, in 2014, 1,283 children on foot were killed or seriously injured on Great Britain’s roads [7], 511 of these in the morning or evening of a school-day [8].

Take action: Support Brake’s GO 20 campaign for slower speeds in towns, cities and villages, and Brake’s rural roads not racetracks campaign for slower speeds on country roads.

Local authorities

Local authorities have a duty to promote the use of sustainable transport, including for children on their way to school [9]. The first official lollipop people were introduced in the 1950s [10]. Lollipop people are appointed by the county council, the metropolitan district council, or in London the Metropolitan Police [11]. It is the law that drivers have to stop for a lollipop person when they indicate traffic to stop, and since 2001 they have had the power to help both children and adults to cross the road [12].  

There are many ways of making sure our children can walk and cycle safely to school. Slowing down traffic, for example by establishing 20mph limits, is a powerful way to make their journeys safer [13]. Yet lollipop people retain a key role to play in making our streets safer, not least as they offer a friendly face that encourages active and sustainable travel.

Take our interactive quiz on 20mph limits

End notes 

[1] ITV news, “Are cuts in lollipop lady number putting our children at risk?”, 2014

[2] National Travel Survey 2014: Travel to school, Department for Transport, 2015

[3] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual Report 2015, Table RAS30016, Department for Transport, 2016

[4] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Table RAS30030, Department for Transport, 2016

[5] ITV news (2014) “Are cuts in lollipop lady number putting our children at risk?”

[6] National Travel Survey 2014: Travel to school, Department for Transport, 2015

[7] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual Report 2015, Table RAS30016, Department for Transport, 2016

[8] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: Annual report 2015, Table RAS30030, Department for Transport, 2016

[9] Home to school travel and transport guidance: Statutory guidance for local authorities, Department for Transport, 2014

[10] Moran, J., “Crossing the road in Britain 1931-1976”, 2006, The Historical Journal49(2) pp.477-496

[11] RoSPA, School Crossing Patrol Service Guidelines, 2012

[12] Traffic at 30mph is too fast for children’s visual capabilities, University of Royal Holloway London, 2010

[13] See Brake’s Go 20 campaign for 20mph limits where people walk, shop and go to school.


Page last updated: January 2016

Kate Green, MP for Stretford and Urmston

kgreenKate Green, MP for Stretford and Urmston, has won a national award from the road safety charity Brake and Direct Line Group for her campaign for safer roads in her constituency.

Kate launched her Safer Trafford Streets campaign in January 2013 in response to the road safety concerns of local residents who did not feel safe walking and cycling in their own neighbourhoods, and who had also raised concerns about unsafe parking and inconsiderate road use.

Kate asked local residents what the biggest problems were locally, identifying a list of dangerous roads and speeding hotspots which she presented to Trafford Council.  She also held a number of ‘walkabouts’ with residents to see the hazards for herself.

Kate found the top concern for residents was speeding, with widespread support for 20mph limits in residential neighbourhoods and outside schools. Kate is a strong supporter of Brake’s GO 20 campaign, and was joined in February 2013 at Acre Hall School by Brake’s mascot, Zak the Zebra, to call for the lower limit around schools in her constituency.

In May 2013 Kate held a road safety day at Stretford fire station, aimed mainly at giving road safety advice to young people, but open to all. Hundreds of people turned up to get advice on car and bike maintenance, have their vehicles checked over, learn about drink driving limits and watch a crash extrication demonstration by the fire service.

Trafford Council debated road safety in July 2013 to address the concerns highlighted in Kate’s consultation with residents. Since then, Kate has been following up on residents’ concerns, including road conditions and signage, and parking problems near Trafford General Hospital. She pressed Trafford Council in October 2013 to address the dangers on roads around St Matt’s Primary School in Stretford, and continues to back campaigns for 20mph limits, including on residential roads in Urmston.

Other recent successes include repairs to unsafe road surfaces and, in October 2013, helping to highlight the need for action to tackle the number of HGVs using residential Barton Road in Stretford as a cut-through.

Kate has also been a strong voice for road safety in Parliament; she spoke up for local cyclists from Trafford Cycle Forum in September 2013, asking for more local powers to improve cycling facilities.

Kate has vowed to continue her work into 2014, and is holding a road safety event in March at St Hilda’s Primary School in Stretford, designed to tackle inconsiderate parking around schools.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, said: “Kate has long demonstrated an outstanding commitment to road safety, and is consistently responsive to the concerns of local residents. Brake shares Kate’s vision of communities where people can walk and cycle safely, without fear or threat of being knocked down and hurt. Hence we are campaigning nationally for widespread 20 limits and other measures to create a safer, more pleasant environment for walking and cycling – and we thank Kate for her support of our GO 20 campaign. We are delighted to recognise Kate’s tireless and impressive campaigning with this award and wish her all the best with her ongoing work towards safer streets.”

Kate Green, MP for Stretford and Urmston said: “I’m proud and delighted to win Brake’s award and would like to thank the charity for all the help they’ve offered me in my road safety campaigning over the past year.

“I know that road safety is an issue that local people care deeply about, and I’m looking forward to taking the campaign for Safer Trafford Streets forward in 2014.”

 

 

New road safety project for primary schools puts focus on children’s rights to walk safely

Primary schools have just six weeks to get involved with a new road safety project that focuses on giving children the right to walk safely in their communities.

Brake’s Kids Walk, in partnership with Co-op Insurance, will see thousands of children, aged 4-11, put their best feet forward to promote road safety and the health and planet-saving benefits of walking.

The short, supervised walks will take place on Wednesday 13 June 2018 at or around schools, with children walking in a crocodile formation and holding hands to promote the importance of kids being able to walk without fear or threat from traffic.

So far more than 50,000 children from over 300 UK schools have registered to take part, with thousands more expected to get involved over the next month.

The project, coordinated by road safety charity Brake, is calling on five measures to help keep children safe: footpaths, cycle paths, safe places to cross, slow traffic and clean traffic.

Every school that registers via www.brake.org.uk/kidswalk will receive a free action pack full of posters, banners, lesson plans, assembly presentations and activities to run with their children. Bilingual resources will be available for schools in Wales. And hundreds of schools will use the event as a fundraiser for Brake - the charity that supports families who have lost loved ones in road crashes.

The charity has also teamed up with the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) and National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) to help local police and fire officers support schools with their walks, especially those that have problems with traffic and parking.

For more information and to register visit www.brake.org.uk/kidswalk

Dave Nichols, community engagement manager for Brake, the road safety charity, said:“Brake is passionate about the safety and welfare of children. We believe it's every child's right to be able to walk in their communities without fear of traffic and pollution. But to do this, we need to make sure their journeys are safe. This is why we’re already working with thousands of children to give them and their school a voice, and I would encourage any school to join this project and help get these important messages out to grown-ups.”

Nick Ansley, Head of Motor Insurance at the Co-op said:“Our aim is to help to keep communities safe and this is another way in which we’re hoping to do just that.
“Each school across the UK faces different issues whether it be available footpaths, safe places to cross, or cycle paths. In partnership with Brake, we’re hoping to raise awareness amongst all road users to ensure school children and their parents have a safe walk to school.”

[ENDS]

Notes to editors

Promotional photos and videos are available on request from kidswalk@brake.org.uk

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.

We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

About Co-op Insurance:

Co-op Insurance is part of Co-op Group, one of the world’s largest consumer co-ops, owned by millions of members. Alongside Co-op Insurance, we have the UK’s fifth biggest food retailer, the UK’s number one funeral services provider, and a developing legal services business.

As well as having clear financial and operational objectives, the Group is a recognised leader for its social goals and community-led programmes.

Primary schools urged to run Beep Beep! and Bright Days for Road Safety Week

Brake, the road safety charity

7 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

Primary schools are being encouraged to raise awareness about keeping children safe when walking and cycling, by hosting Bright Days and Beep Beep! Days in Road Safety Week (19-25 November), the UK's flagship road safety event coordinated by the charity Brake. It's a chance for schools to promote life-saving messages to pupils, parents and local communities, using free resources, as part of a UK-wide campaign.

Brake's theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Brake will be emphasising the importance of making it safer for children and adults to walk and cycle in their communities, for their health and enjoyment and as a sustainable transport choice. Brake will be calling for action from authorities to make walking and cycling safer, and appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for children on foot and bikes. Read more.

Road Safety Week is about thousands of schools, communities and organisations taking action on road safety, and there are lots of simple ways to get involved. Educators can register now to get a free email action pack with resources, guidance and ideas at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Brake is particularly calling on primary schools to coordinate:

Beep Beep! Days for years one and two, to teach tots the road safety basics through fun road safety activities, as part of a national initiative by Brake and Churchill Car Insurance;

Bright Days for the whole school: a dress down day with a difference that promotes the importance of drivers looking out for children, and the 'be bright be seen' message; a national initiative by Brake and Autoglass ®.

Schools running these activities get a free pack of resources. Both activities enable schools to raise awareness and support Brake's work campaigning for safer roads and supporting bereaved and injured crash victims.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: "Road Safety Week is a great opportunity for schools to help make our streets safer, greener, more pleasant places, which is essential in enabling children to lead active lives. Bright Dayand Beep Beep! Days are fun, simple ways to get involved. Through activities like these, educators can not only help teach children about road safety, they can play a key role in persuading parents and the wider community about the vital importance of putting children's safety first. During Road Safety Week, Brake will be appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for kids and adults on foot and bicycle. We're calling on schools everywhere to join this vital campaign: register now on the Road Safety Week website to get free resources and inspiration on spreading life-saving messages in your community."

Autoglass® managing director Matthew Mycock says: "It is paramount that children learn road safety guidelines from a young age to help to keep them safe. That is why we firmly support Brake's Road Safety Week initiative. The dedicated week provides a great platform to help get schools involved and ensure the dangers posed by irresponsible driving as well as from poorly informed children are given firm focus so improvements can be made.

As part of the initiative, we are proud to continue our support for Bright Days, which provide a fun way for schools to send a serious road safety message to children in keeping themselves visible to drivers especially during the darker winter nights."

Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk then educators for more ideas and to register. Or sign up for a Beep Beep! Day or Bright Day on 01484 559909 or beepbeep@brake.org.uk.

Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

Autoglass

Autoglass® is the UK's leading vehicle glass repair and replacement service, with 101 branches nationwide and 1,300 mobile service units. For details of your nearest centre call 0800 36 36 36 or visit www.Autoglass.co.uk.

Churchill

Founded in 1989, Churchill is now one of the UK's leading providers of general insurance, offering car, home, travel and pet insurance cover over the phone or on-line.

Churchill general insurance policies are underwritten by U K Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England and Wales no 1179980. U K Insurance Limited are authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

Churchill and U K Insurance Limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc, the number one car and home insurer in the UK (based on policies in force 2010) and is wholly owned by the Royal Bank of Scotland Group.

Customers can find out more about Churchill products or get a quote by calling 0800 200300 or visiting www.churchill.com

Safety concerns are barrier to delivering walking and cycling benefits, says charity

Tuesday 10 February 2015

Brake, the road safety charity
news@brake.org.uk 

A guidance report released today (10 February 2015) by road safety charity Brake suggests that fears over safety by young people and their parents are posing a serious barrier to young people walking and cycling, preventing great benefits being delivered to health and wellbeing.

Brake surveyed 1,301 11-17 year olds in secondary schools and colleges across the UK, finding almost half (47%) said parental worries were preventing them from starting cycling or cycling more.

Increased walking and cycling promise huge economic and public health benefits, with recent research claiming that hitting ambitious cycling targets could net the nation £248 billion by 2050 [1].

However, fears over safety act as a persistent barrier to cycling take-up in the UK and to promoting more active lifestyles (see facts below). Brake’s report also found:

  • two in five (38%) 11-17 year olds cite a lack of safe routes as a barrier to cycling
  • four in 10 (41%) think traffic in their area is too fast for the safety of people on foot and bike
  • nearly four in 10 (37%) think their area needs more pavements, paths and cycle paths

With 504 12-15 year olds killed or seriously injured while walking, and 186 while cycling, in the UK in 2013 [2], these concerns are understandable and must be addressed.

The findings reinforce the urgent need for a cycling and walking investment strategy, as proposed by the government as part of the Infrastructure Bill making its way through parliament. The proposal has been welcomed by Brake and many other road safety, sustainable transport and public health organisations. Brake believes it is critical that the Infrastructure Bill includes a long term commitment to investing in more segregated routes to improve the safety – and perceived safety – of walking and cycling.

The widespread adoption of 20mph limits in cities, towns and villages is also critical to creating safe and inviting walking and cycling environments. 20mph limits are a tried and tested way to cut pedestrian and cyclist casualties [3], and increase levels of walking and cycling [4]. In the run-up to the general election, through its GO 20 campaign, Brake is calling on all parties to include a commitment to 20mph as the default urban speed limit as a key manifesto pledge.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive, Brake, said:“All parents want their children to be healthy and happy, and many would love to see them walking and cycling more to achieve that. Young people want this too: it’s crucial to their health, wellbeing, and social and economic lives that they can get around easily and cheaply. That so many teenagers are being held back from walking and cycling by safety fears, in spite of its great benefits, is a shocking indictment of our road infrastructure. With the car as king in transport planning, walkers and cyclists have been for too long treated as second-class citizens. The safety of people on foot and bike is hugely important, as is enabling more people to make sustainable, active travel choices without fear of traffic danger. It is vital that the government builds this into long term transport planning, through the Infrastructure Bill, investment in safe walking and cycling routes, and making 20mph limits the norm in towns, cities and villages.”

Educators, youth workers and road safety professionals can recieve a free copy of the report from this form.

About Brake’s GO 20 campaign

Brake is part of a broad coalition of organisations calling for more local authorities to adopt widespread 20mph limits, and for the government to make 20mph the national urban default, through its GO 20 campaign. Tweet us:@Brakecharity, hashtag #GO20.

Why GO 20?

  • Fewer casualties: at 20, drivers have far more time to react in an emergency. Studies show when 20 limits replace 30, there are fewer casualties among pedestrians and cyclists [5].
  • More walking and cycling: danger from traffic is a major barrier in enabling more people to walk and cycle. Town and city-wide 20 limits have resulted in more people walking and cycling [6].
  • Healthier, happier people: More walking and cycling means healthier people, and more enjoyable outdoors activity for kids and adults. It helps communities interact and be communities.
  • Less pollution:GOing 20 means lower emissions from vehicle journeys [7]. Plus if more people can switch their commute or school run to foot or bike, it means less polluting traffic.
  • Lower costs: Poor health from inactivity costs society dearly [8]. Road casualties cost even more, due to the suffering and burden on health and emergency services [9]. Preventing casualties and improving health means GOing 20 pays for itself many times over [10]. It also helps people save money by choosing the cheapest ways to get about: foot and bike.

The facts: sustainable and active travel

For the population of England, in 2013, 64% of all trips were by car as a driver or passenger, 22% of all trips were on foot, and 1% by bike. Trips made on foot have declined by 30% since 1995 [11].

Two-thirds of British adults are overweight or obese, as are a third of students in year six (ages 10-11). Obese children tend to become obese adults. Safe walking and cycling is a key component of the government’s scheme to combat obesity [12].

Road danger is a major barrier in encouraging more people to walk and cycle. Eight in 10 people (79%) say they would walk and cycle more if local roads were safer [13].

Case studies

Steven Atkinson, 12, from Sunderland, was pushing his bike across Chester Road in 2009 when he was hit by a speeding driver. He was rushed to hospital, where he died from his injuries. Find out more.

Violet Atkinson, Steven’s mother, says: “After everything Steven went through, I am so proud of him. He never looked at his health as a problem and lived every day to the full. No words can describe the grief our family has gone through since his death. There’s a piece of us missing and there’s no way to escape that. My son is gone. I will never see him again, and it will never get easier. I don’t want another mother to experience the pain of seeing her child die. I’m appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for pedestrians and cyclists. And I’m backing Brake’s calls for government to invest in safer streets for walking and cycling, for children, families and people of all ages.’’

Guy Preston, 18, from Beverley was knocked from his bike in 2010 by a car travelling along the A1079. He spent three weeks in hospital suffering terrible pain and lost the majority of his childhood memories, alongside the ability to run or play football. Find out more.

Guy says: “Those three weeks after the crash were some of my darkest moments. Going from being so independent to needing support with every activity is a crushing blow to an individual’s self-esteem. My family was my rock, but every day was an immense struggle, and I felt lonely and isolated. Throughout my three years at university, my injuries were still a burden. To this day, I experience constant pain and aching in my left leg. On a good day, I can tolerate the aching, but on a bad day, I am unable to walk and confined to my bed. Despite my disabilities, I am hopeful for the future. I will never be able to run again. I will never be able to dance at my wedding, or play football with my children. I have lost almost all my memories from my childhood, and I still struggle to remember things in my day-to-day life. But I realise I am lucky to be alive. I’m fully behind Brake’s campaign to stop people being injured and killed while walking and cycling. We all should be able to get around without fearing for our lives.’’

Notes to editors

About the report

These figures come from the Brake guidance report: ‘safer walking and cycling for secondary students’, released today (10 February 2015). It is based on a survey of 1,301 11-17 year-olds, created and promoted by Brake and carried out by secondary schools and colleges across the UK in 2013-14 through ‘hands-up’ surveys in 61 lessons, assemblies and workshops.

Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

End notes

[1] Research shows growth in cycling could be worth £1/4 trillion, CTC, 2015http://www.ctc.org.uk/news/20150120-research-shows-growth-cycling-worth-%25C2%25BC-trillion-england%25E2%2580%2599s-economy
[2] Reported road casualties Great Britain 2013, Department for Transport, 2014
[3]For example,20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[4]Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20%Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012
[5] For example,20mph speed reduction initiative, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2001; 20mph Speed Limit Pilots Evaluation Report, Warrington Borough Council, 2010
[6] Where widespread 20 limits have been introduced levels of walking and cycling increased by 20%Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012
[7]Environmental effects of 30 km/h in urban areas – with regard to exhaust emissions and noise, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 1999
[8] The annual costs of physical inactivity in England are estimated at £8.2 billion.At least five a week - evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health - a report from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, 2004
[9] Road casualties in Britain cost an estimated £34.8billion in 2011, due to the burden on health and emergency services, criminal justice costs, insurance payouts, and human costs. Reported road casualties Great Britain annual reports 2011, Department for Transport, 2012
[10] In Bristol, 20mph resulted in a massive return on investment because of cost savings to the health service through increased physical activity. They used theWorld Health Organisation’s Health Economic Assessment Tool to estimate the changes in costs. They found for every £1 spent they saw a return of £24.72 through increased walking and £7.47 through increased in cycling.Citywide Rollout of 20mph speed limits, Bristol City Council Cabinet, 2012.  Reducing speeds in urban environments reduces casualties. For each 1mph speed reduction, casualties decrease by 5%, The effects of drivers’ speed on the frequency of road accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 2000, fewer crashes reduces the burden on the NHS, emergency services and local economy.  Each death on roads costs £1.7 million and each serious injury costs £190,000, Reported road casualties Great Britain 2011, Department for Transport, 2012
[11] Travel Survey: England 2013, Department for Transport, 2014https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/342160/nts2013-01.pdf
[12] Obesity and the environment: increasing physical activity and active travel, Public Health England, 2013https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/256796/Briefing_Obesity_and_active_travel_final.pdf
[13] Eight in 10 back 20mph limits as charity takes campaign to parliament, Brake, 2014,http://www.brake.org.uk/news/1202-go20reception

Secondary schools urged to run 2young2Die campaigns in Road Safety Week

Brake, the road safety charity

15 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

Secondary school teachers are being encouraged to inspire and support young people to run 2young2die campaigns during Road Safety Week (19-25 November), the UK's flagship road safety event coordinated by the charity Brake. It's a chance to get teenagers actively engaged with road safety, highlighting the dangers of risky behaviour and importance of safe walking and cycling, using free resources and as part of a UK-wide initiative.

Brake's theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Brake will be promoting the importance of making it safer for everyone to walk and cycle, without fear from fast traffic, for health and enjoyment. Brake will be calling for local authorities to make our roads safer and appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities. Read more. Secondary schools can tie in with this theme by helping young people develop their own slow down campaigns, or focus on any other road safety topic.

Road Safety Week is about thousands of schools, communities and organisations taking action on road safety, and there are lots of simple ways to get involved. Anyone can register now to get a free e-action pack with resources, guidance and ideas at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Brake is particularly calling on secondary schools to coordinate:

• Young person-led road safety campaigns, particularly focusing on the importance of slowing down to protect people on foot and bike, which can be entered into Brake's national 2young2die awards, sponsored by ikube ®.

Bright Days: a dress down day with a difference that promotes the importance of drivers looking out for people on foot and bicycle, and the 'be bright be seen' message; a national initiative by Brake and Autoglass ®. Bright Day organisers get a free pack of resources.

Both activities enable schools to raise awareness and funds to support Brake's work campaigning for safer roads and supporting bereaved and injured crash victims.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: "Road Safety Week is a great chance for schools to engage young people in road safety, to help them understand how they can keep themselves and others safe, and raise awareness in the wider community – and our 2young2die and Bright Days initiatives are brilliant ways to get involved. Road crashes are the biggest killer of young people, and road danger is a major barrier to children and young people being able to live active lifestyles. So this is a critical issue for schools to tackle, to help prevent needless casualties and make streets safer for walking and cycling.

"During Road Safety Week, Brake will be appealing to drivers to slow down to 20mph in communities and look out for people on foot and bicycle. We're calling on schools everywhere to join this vital campaign: register now on the Road Safety Week website to get free resources and inspiration."

Autoglass® managing director Matthew Mycock says: "It is paramount that children learn road safety guidelines from a young age to help to keep them safe. That is why we firmly support Brake's Road Safety Week initiative. The dedicated week provides a great platform to help get schools involved and ensure the dangers posed by irresponsible driving as well as from poorly informed children are given firm focus so improvements can be made.

As part of the initiative, we are proud to continue our support for Bright Days, which provide a fun way for schools to send a serious road safety message to children in keeping themselves visible to drivers especially during the darker winter nights."

Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk then educators for more ideas and to register. Or sign up for a Bright Day on 01484 559909 or bright@brake.org.uk.

Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 66 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

Autoglass

Autoglass® is the UK's leading vehicle glass repair and replacement service, with 101 branches nationwide and 1,300 mobile service units. For details of your nearest centre call 0800 36 36 36 or visit www.Autoglass.co.uk.

Ikube

iKube is an insurance product offered through Motaquote in conjunction with a number of insurance providers.

Established in 1991, Motaquote specialises in a wide range of personal and commercial lines insurance. Headquartered in Williamstown, South Wales it is part of nationwide group, Cullum Capital Ventures (CCV).Cullum Capital Ventures (CCV), part of the Towergate Group, is one of the UK's largest independently owned insurance intermediaries with more than 800 staff. Headquartered in Maidstone, it offers a wide range of general insurance products nationwide. For regional brokers looking to sell their business, CCV can provide flexible full or partial ownership solutions. Businesses can continue to trade under their own brand, while CCV is committed to providing full support across all management functions.

 

Smile, wave and walk competition!

A chance to win an entertainment system for your school!

The Competition

Primary schools across the UK are being challenged to walk the distance to Madagascar as part of a new partnership between DreamWorks Animation’s Penguins of Madagascar on DVD, Blu-ray and Digital HD, and road safety charity Brake.penguins of madagascar wide

The total number of miles schools are required to walk throughout the summer term is 5618,and this can be achieved by all pupils in the school.  Walking to and from school is a great way to achieve daily exercise targets and perfect for the summer months, and helps to reduce the number of cars on our roads reducing pollution and making our roads safer. 

The national initiative was launched on Friday 27th March at Albemarle Primary School in Wimbledon, as all 280 pupils were led on a fun walk to school by Rhys Edwards, the star of the John Lewis Christmas advert, four penguin costumed characters and a real life Humboldt penguin.

To enter

The competition is open to all primary schools across the UK throughout the summer term starting on the 13th April with the closing date for entries being the 22nd May 2015.

Teachers are required to update their school’s tally on the entry form which can be downloaded below.  After the closing date one of the schools who have achieved the walking distance will then be selected at random to win a  prize for their school, consisting of entertainment systems and a year’s supply of children’s Blu-rays and DVDs.

Click hereto download the entry form:

Thousands of North East school children join UK-wide march calling for safer roads for kids

More than two thousand primary school children from 13 schools in the North East will be marching for safer roads at 10am today, Wednesday 20 June, as part of the UK-wide Giant Walking Bus, coordinated by Brake, the road safety charity. They will be calling on drivers to help protect children on foot in their communities by slowing down to 20mph around schools, homes and shops. 

Across the country, more than 120,000 kids from 600 schools will be simultaneously marching for road safety: saying yes to safe walking, and no to fast traffic. They will be trying to beat the Guinness World Record for the largest walking bus, set at 119,697 through the same event in 2009.

Brake is today revealing new government statistics showing that each week on North East roads, seven children are knocked down and hurt while on foot [1]. At the same time, nationwide more and more parents are driving their children to school, meaning more traffic and pollution, and less chance for kids to get exercise [2].

Brake is calling on drivers across the region to help prevent tragedies, and make roads safer for children to walk to school and get out and about in their neighbourhood, by pledging to slow down to 20mph in communities. This is the compassionate, socially responsible way to drive, giving you time to react and brake in an emergency, such as if a child suddenly steps out (see facts below). Drivers can make Brake's Pledge at www.brake.org.uk/pledge.

Brake is also calling for more 20mph limits, and other measures to protect people on foot, to make towns and villages safer, greener, healthier and more family-friendly. Brake is calling on the government to encourage and enable more local authorities to implement widespread 20mph limits, and appealing to councils to make this progressive step. Communities concerned about children's safety can report their concerns and get advice on campaigning for road safety at www.brake.org.uk/zak-the-zebra.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive of Brake, says: "The Giant Walking Bus is all about schools, kids and communities saying yes to safe walking – because children should be able to walk in their own neighbourhoods without being endangered. Too many children suffer due to fast traffic in their area, whether it's stopping them getting out and about and enjoying being a kid, or worse, suffering a terrible injury or even being killed. But we can do something about this. Drivers everywhere can help make roads safer for children by pledging to slow down to 20mph or below around schools, homes and shops, or avoiding driving altogether if possible, especially for short journeys. It's a simple commitment that can make a huge difference, helping to create safer, greener, more family-friendly communities."

For interviews with Brake contact news@brake.org.uk.

About Giant Walking Bus

Giant Walking Bus is an annual event coordinated by Brake, with primary school children around the UK walking simultaneously in a supervised group around their school or on a nearby route, while learning about and promoting safe walking. Schools get free road safety resources and can choose to raise funds for Brake. In the run up and on the day, kids can learn about traffic pollution, danger and transport choices and create their own placards and posters. The children also aim to raise thousands of pounds for Brake's work supporting families bereaved or injured by a road crash and campaigning for safer roads for everyone.

Brake's calls to government

Brake wants to see the urban default speed limit reduced from 30mph to 20mph, to enable people to walk and cycle safely in their community across the country. In the meantime, Brake calls on the government to enable, encourage and fund more local authorities to implement town, village and city-wide 20mph limits, alongside other measures to protect people on foot and bicycle, like safe pavements, paths and crossings.

Brake is also appealing to local authorities everywhere to prioritise the safety and health of local people by taking steps to make walking and cycling safer, like implementing widespread 20mph limits.

Read more about Brake's Slower speeds save lives campaign.

Facts about children's safety on roads

Across the UK, 28 children were killed and 1,677 were seriously injured on foot in 2010 [3]. While child road casualties in the UK have fallen in the past decade, year-on-year we have made less progress than many other European countries [4]. Our child pedestrian death rate remains higher than 10 other EU countries, and three times higher than Finland's [5]. So while the UK has the second lowest road death rate in the EU, we have a relatively poor record for protecting children, and could do much more to prevent these devastating casualties.

Traffic is the biggest non-medical cause of death for UK children [6], and the poorest children are most at risk: children in the lowest socio-economic group are more than four times more likely to be killed on foot than those in the highest group. See a reportmapping the parts of the UK where children are most at risk [7].

At the same time, parents are more and more likely to take their child to school by car than let them walk or cycle. The 'school run' now accounts for 24% of car trips in urban areas at peak times [8]. A recent survey by Brake and Churchill highlighted parents' fears for children's safety on roads: 90% said children were endangered by fast traffic in their area, and 74% said they would walk more if local roads were safer [9].

Slowing down to 20mph in communities is critical in protecting children and other vulnerable road users, because it gives drivers a far better chance of stopping in time in an emergency. At 20mph, if a child suddenly steps out three car lengths ahead, you should just be able to stop in time. At 30mph, you would barely have time to hit the brakes, and would hit the child at 27mph, with a significant chance of seriously maiming or killing them.

20mph limits have been shown to be highly effective in improving safety, especially for children on foot. For example, see research on the impact of 20mph zones in Londonand Hull, an initial evaluation of city-wide 20mph limits in Portsmouth, and research into 30km/h limits (about 19mph) in the Netherlands.

About Brake 

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents: they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to tackle needless casualties and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

End notes:

[1] 366 children age 0-15 year-old were injured or killed as pedestrians in 2010 in the North East region (one death, 84 serious injuries; and 281 slight injuries); figures obtained by Brake from the Department for Transport, May 2012

[2] In 2010, 43% of primary school children in Britain were driven to school, while 47% walked, compared to 1998-2000 averages of 37% being driven and 56% walking. National Travel Survey 2010, Department for Transport, 2011

[3] Statistics for 0-15 year-old pedestrians provided to Brake by the Department for Transport (for England, Wales and Scotland) and Police Service of Northern Ireland (for Northern Ireland), May 2012

[4] Reducing child deaths on European Roads, ETSC PIN Flash 12, 2009,

[5] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain 2010, Department for Transport 2011

[6] Deaths by age, sex and selected underlying cause, 2010 registrations: England and Wales, Office for National Statistics; Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, 2010 registrations, Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency; Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, Vital Events Reference Tables 2010, General Register Office for Scotland

[7] A study into resident risk of children on roads in Great Britain 2004-08, Road Safety Analysis, 2010

[8] National Travel Survey 2010, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[9] Survey of 1,000 parents of children under 16 conducted by Redshift research on behalf of Brake and Churchill Car Insurance in March 2012

Thousands of South of England school children join UK-wide march calling for safer roads for kids

3,972 primary school children from 24 schools in the South of England region will be marching for safer roads at 10am today, Wednesday 20 June, as part of the UK-wide Giant Walking Bus, coordinated by Brake, the road safety charity. They will be calling on drivers to help protect children on foot in their communities by slowing down to 20mph around schools, homes and shops. 

Across the country, more than 120,000 kids from 600 schools will be simultaneously marching for road safety: saying yes to safe walking, and no to fast traffic. They will be trying to beat the Guinness World Record for the largest walking bus, set at 119,697 through the same event in 2009.

Brake is today revealing new government statistics showing that each week on roads in the South of England region, 10 children are knocked down and hurt while on foot [1]. At the same time, nationwide more and more parents are driving their children to school, meaning more traffic and pollution, and less chance for kids to get exercise [2].

Brake is calling on drivers across the region to help prevent tragedies, and make roads safer for children to walk to school and get out and about in their neighbourhood, by pledging to slow down to 20mph in communities. This is the compassionate, socially responsible way to drive, giving you time to react and brake in an emergency, such as if a child suddenly steps out (see facts below). Drivers can make Brake's Pledge at www.brake.org.uk/pledge.

Brake is also calling for more 20mph limits, and other measures to protect people on foot, to make towns and villages safer, greener, healthier and more family-friendly. Brake is calling on the government to encourage and enable more local authorities to implement widespread 20mph limits, and appealing to councils to make this progressive step. Communities concerned about children's safety can report their concerns and get advice on campaigning for road safety at www.brake.org.uk/zak-the-zebra.

Julie Townsend, deputy chief executive of Brake, says: "The Giant Walking Bus is all about schools, kids and communities saying yes to safe walking – because children should be able to walk in their own neighbourhoods without being endangered. Too many children suffer due to fast traffic in their area, whether it's stopping them getting out and about and enjoying being a kid, or worse, suffering a terrible injury or even being killed. But we can do something about this. Drivers everywhere can help make roads safer for children by pledging to slow down to 20mph or below around schools, homes and shops, or avoiding driving altogether if possible, especially for short journeys. It's a simple commitment that can make a huge difference, helping to create safer, greener, more family-friendly communities."

About Giant Walking Bus

Giant Walking Bus is an annual event coordinated by Brake, with primary school children around the UK walking simultaneously in a supervised group around their school or on a nearby route, while learning about and promoting safe walking. Schools get free road safety resources and can choose to raise funds for Brake. In the run up and on the day, kids can learn about traffic pollution, danger and transport choices and create their own placards and posters. The children also aim to raise thousands of pounds for Brake's work supporting families bereaved or injured by a road crash and campaigning for safer roads for everyone.

Brake's calls to government

Brake wants to see the urban default speed limit reduced from 30mph to 20mph, to enable people to walk and cycle safely in their community across the country. In the meantime, Brake calls on the government to enable, encourage and fund more local authorities to implement town, village and city-wide 20mph limits, alongside other measures to protect people on foot and bicycle, like safe pavements, paths and crossings.

Brake is also appealing to local authorities everywhere to prioritise the safety and health of local people by taking steps to make walking and cycling safer, like implementing widespread 20mph limits.

Read more about Brake's Slower speeds save lives campaign.

Facts about children's safety on roads

Across the UK, 28 children were killed and 1,677 were seriously injured on foot in 2010 [3]. While child road casualties in the UK have fallen in the past decade, year-on-year we have made less progress than many other European countries [4]. Our child pedestrian death rate remains higher than 10 other EU countries, and three times higher than Finland's [5]. So while the UK has the second lowest road death rate in the EU, we have a relatively poor record for protecting children, and could do much more to prevent these devastating casualties.

Traffic is the biggest non-medical cause of death for UK children [6], and the poorest children are most at risk: children in the lowest socio-economic group are more than four times more likely to be killed on foot than those in the highest group. See a reportmapping the parts of the UK where children are most at risk [7].

At the same time, parents are more and more likely to take their child to school by car than let them walk or cycle. The 'school run' now accounts for 24% of car trips in urban areas at peak times [8]. A recent surveyby Brake and Churchill highlighted parents' fears for children's safety on roads: 90% said children were endangered by fast traffic in their area, and 74% said they would walk more if local roads were safer [9].

Slowing down to 20mph in communities is critical in protecting children and other vulnerable road users, because it gives drivers a far better chance of stopping in time in an emergency. At 20mph, if a child suddenly steps out three car lengths ahead, you should just be able to stop in time. At 30mph, you would barely have time to hit the brakes, and would hit the child at 27mph, with a significant chance of seriously maiming or killing them.

20mph limits have been shown to be highly effective in improving safety, especially for children on foot. For example, see research on the impact of 20mph zones in Londonand Hull, an initial evaluation of city-wide 20mph limits in Portsmouth, and research into 30km/h limits (about 19mph) in the Netherlands.

About Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents: they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to tackle needless casualties and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

End notes:

[1] 552 children age 0-15 year-old were injured as pedestrians in 2010 in the South of England region (three deaths, 121 serious injuries; and 398 slight injuries); figures obtained by Brake from the Department for Transport, May 2012

[2] In 2010, 43% of primary school children in Britain were driven to school, while 47% walked, compared to 1998-2000 averages of 37% being driven and 56% walking. National Travel Survey 2010, Department for Transport, 2011

[3] Statistics for 0-15 year-old pedestrians provided to Brake by the Department for Transport (for England, Wales and Scotland) and Police Service of Northern Ireland (for Northern Ireland), May 2012

[4] Reducing child deaths on European Roads, ETSC PIN Flash 12, 2009,

[5] Reported Road Casualties Great Britain 2010, Department for Transport 2011

[6] Deaths by age, sex and selected underlying cause, 2010 registrations: England and Wales, Office for National Statistics; Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, 2010 registrations, Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency; Table 6.4 Deaths, by sex, age and cause, Vital Events Reference Tables 2010, General Register Office for Scotland

[7] A study into resident risk of children on roads in Great Britain 2004-08, Road Safety Analysis, 2010

[8] National Travel Survey 2010, Office for National Statistics, 2011

[9] Survey of 1,000 parents of children under 16 conducted by Redshift research on behalf of Brake and Churchill Car Insurance in March 2012

Trafford MP wins national road safety award for safer streets campaign

3 January 2014

Brake, the road safety charity
News@brake.org.uk

Kate Green, MP for Stretford and Urmston, has won a national award from the road safety charity Brake and Direct Line Group for her campaign for safer roads in her constituency.

Kate launched her Safer Trafford Streets campaign in January 2013 in response to the road safety concerns of local residents who did not feel safe walking and cycling in their own neighbourhoods, and who had also raised concerns about unsafe parking and inconsiderate road use.

Kate asked local residents what the biggest problems were locally, identifying a list of dangerous roads and speeding hotspots which she presented to Trafford Council.  She also held a number of ‘walkabouts’ with residents to see the hazards for herself.

Kate found the top concern for residents was speeding, with widespread support for 20mph limits in residential neighbourhoods and outside schools. Kate is a strong supporter of Brake’s GO 20 campaign, and was joined in February 2013 at Acre Hall School by Brake’s mascot, Zak the Zebra, to call for the lower limit around schools in her constituency.

In May 2013 Kate held a road safety day at Stretford fire station, aimed mainly at giving road safety advice to young people, but open to all. Hundreds of people turned up to get advice on car and bike maintenance, have their vehicles checked over, learn about drink driving limits and watch a crash extrication demonstration by the fire service.

Trafford Council debated road safety in July 2013 to address the concerns highlighted in Kate’s consultation with residents. Since then, Kate has been following up on residents’ concerns, including road conditions and signage, and parking problems near Trafford General Hospital. She pressed Trafford Council in October 2013 to address the dangers on roads around St Matt’s Primary School in Stretford, and continues to back campaigns for 20mph limits, including on residential roads in Urmston.

Other recent successes include repairs to unsafe road surfaces and, in October 2013, helping to highlight the need for action to tackle the number of HGVs using residential Barton Road in Stretford as a cut-through.

Kate has also been a strong voice for road safety in Parliament; she spoke up for local cyclists from Trafford Cycle Forum in September 2013, asking for more local powers to improve cycling facilities.

Kate has vowed to continue her work into 2014, and is holding a road safety event in March at St Hilda’s Primary School in Stretford, designed to tackle inconsiderate parking around schools.

Julie Townsend, Brake deputy chief executive, said: “Kate has long demonstrated an outstanding commitment to road safety, and is consistently responsive to the concerns of local residents. Brake shares Kate’s vision of communities where people can walk and cycle safely, without fear or threat of being knocked down and hurt. Hence we are campaigning nationally for widespread 20 limits and other measures to create a safer, more pleasant environment for walking and cycling – and we thank Kate for her support of our GO 20 campaign. We are delighted to recognise Kate’s tireless and impressive campaigning with this award and wish her all the best with her ongoing work towards safer streets.”

Kate Green, MP for Stretford and Urmston said: “I’m proud and delighted to win Brake’s award and would like to thank the charity for all the help they’ve offered me in my road safety campaigning over the past year.

“I know that road safety is an issue that local people care deeply about, and I’m looking forward to taking the campaign for Safer Trafford Streets forward in 2014.”

Notes for editors

Brake
Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 63 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (17-23 November 2014), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake’s support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Direct Line Insurance Group plc
Direct Line Insurance Group plc (Direct Line Group) is headquartered in Bromley, Kent; it has operations in the UK, Germany and Italy.

Through its number of well known brands Direct Line Group offers a wide range of general insurance products to consumers. These brands include; Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. It also offers insurance services for third party brands through its Partnerships division. In the commercial sector, its NIG and Direct Line for Business operations provide insurance products for businesses via brokers or direct respectively.

In addition to insurance services, Direct Line Group continues to provide support and reassurance to millions of UK motorists through its Green Flag breakdown recovery service and TRACKER stolen vehicle recovery and telematics business.

Walkers urged to go bright for safer roads in Road Safety Week

Brake, the road safety charity

8 August 2012
Tel: 01484 559909 Email: news@brake.org.uk

Walkers are being encouraged to help raise awareness about the importance of protecting people on foot and bikes by running a Bright Day during Road Safety Week(19-25 November), the UK's flagship road safety event, coordinated by the charity Brake. It's a chance for ramblers to don their brightest gear to raise awareness, have fun and raise funds for a worthy cause.

Brake's theme for Road Safety Week 2012 is 'Slower speeds = happy people'. Brake will be highlighting the importance of everyone - kids, adults, families - being able to walk and cycle without fear of traffic and for their health and enjoyment. Brake will be calling for action from authorities to introduce lower speed limits and other measures to protect people on foot or bike, and appealing to drivers to slow down for more pedestrian-friendly streets. Read more

Road Safety Week is about thousands of communities, schools and organisations taking action on road safety, and there are lots of simple ways to get involved. Anyone can register now to get a free e-action pack with resources, guidance and ideas on getting involved at www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk.

Brake is particularly calling on walkers to run a Bright Day in their workplace, community or on a hike, where everyone wears bright clothes and makes a donation to Brake. The event helps raise awareness about the importance of drivers looking out for pedestrians and cyclists. It's the perfect excuse for walkers to wear their brightest gear, and funds raised help Brake's work campaigning for safer roads and caring for families bereaved and injured in road crashes.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend says: "Road Safety Week is a great opportunity to work together to make our streets safer, greener, more pleasant places. We believe people should be able to walk and cycle without their lives being endangered by traffic. We'll be calling on authorities to do more to protect people on foot and bike, and calling on drivers to make a difference by slowing down. We're encouraging walkers everywhere to join this vital campaign, by registering now on the Road Safety Week website to get ideas and free resources."

"Organising a Bright Day is a great way to get involved in the UK's biggest road safety event, have fun, raise awareness, and raise funds. It's an effective way to promote an important message, encouraging drivers to look out for and be considerate towards pedestrians and cyclists, including slowing down so they have more chance to react."

Go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk and click on the communities section for more.

About Brake

Brake is an independent road safety charity. Brake exists to stop the five deaths and 65 serious injuries that happen on UK roads every day and to care for families bereaved and seriously injured in road crashes. Brake runs awareness-raising campaigns, community education programmes, events such as Road Safety Week (19-25 November 2012), and a Fleet Safety Forum, providing advice to companies. Brake's support division cares for road crash victims through a helpline and other services.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are man-made, preventable, violent events that devastate lives. Brake does not use the term accidents because it undermines work to reduce road risk and causes insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by road death or injury.

Warm words from government on first Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy – but where IS the money?

contact=everyone@brake.org.uk">

17 December 2015 

news@brake.org.uk

The Department for Transport has today (17 December) published its first cycling and walking investment strategy, claiming it wants walking and cycling to become the natural choice for shorter journeys.

Brake, the road safety charity, has welcomed this approach from the government, but is seriously concerned that without investment the strategy could languish on a shelf in Whitehall.

Gary Rae, director of communication and campaigns for Brake, said: "As always, it’s the Treasury that rules the roost, not, alas, the Department for Transport. The money isn’t there: the Chancellor’s autumn statement included £300m for cycling and walking between now and 2021. This is a 58% cut compared with projected spending of £142m just for cycling in 2015/16 alone.”

“There’s a massive £15B investment in roads building: we think some of that ought to be re-directed towards making this strategy work. We’ll work with the transport department on this. Encouraging people out of their cars and on to foot and bike is healthier for them and our planet – a theme we adopted for last month’s Road Safety Week.”

 

About Brake

Brake is a national road safety charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies. We do this through national campaignscommunity education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.

Follow Brake on TwitterFacebook, or The Brake Blog.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.