Roads are more dangerous now than five years ago, say drivers

News from Brake
Wednesday 24 July 2019
 
Safety campaigners are calling for an increased police presence on the roads to deter people from breaking the law, as a report is launched revealing that drivers feel roads are more dangerous now than they were five years ago.
 
The report, by road safety charity Brake and Direct Line, based on a survey of more than 1,000 drivers, revealed that 7 in 10 feel that the roads are more dangerous now than five years ago, with less than 1 in 10 disagreeing [1]. Drivers also think that the numbers of speeding vehicles and the extent of mobile phone use behind the wheel has increased over this period but that the number of police cars has declined.
 
With severe funding cuts impacting the police service, Brake is concerned that a diminished police presence is contributing to Britain’s stagnating road safety record. Brake’s report revealed that drivers share these concerns, with 8 in 10 agreeing that a visible police presence deters people from breaking the law and a further 8 in 10 thinking there should be more police cars patrolling the roads.
 
More than 70 people are killed or seriously injured on British roads every day, a figure which has failed to decline over the past decade [2]. Police officers play a vital role in enforcing the law, but equally important is their role as a deterrent to dangerous driving, with research showing the safety value in a visible police presence. In the past three years there has been 15% decline in road policing numbers in England and Wales, with just 4,457 full time equivalent officers in March 2019 [3].
 
Road safety charity, Brake, want to see increased investment in road policing to halt the stagnation in road safety and ensure there is visible deterrent to dangerous driving on our roads. This is a view backed up by drivers, with 6 in 10 agreeing that the Government should make road policing an investment priority.
 
Commenting Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake, said: “Drivers’ perceptions tell us a lot about the safety of our roads and so it’s deeply concerning to find that drivers feel the roads are more dangerous than they were five years ago. With roads policing suffering severe cutbacks, and drivers noticing the decreased police presence on our roads, perhaps this shouldn’t come as such a surprise. We have to act to address the stagnation in British road safety by increasing police numbers, to deter and enforce against dangerous driving.”
 
Steve Barrett Head of car insurance at Direct Line, said: “Education, legislation and enforcement are essential to making our roads safer. As this research shows road users feel our roads are not as safe now as they were five years ago. Changing driver behaviour can only be achieved through ensuring they are aware of the potential consequences of their actions and having robust laws in place that are able to be enforced.”
 
[ENDS]
 
Notes to editors:
 
Copy of Brake and Direct Line report on Roads Policing and Criminal Justice can be found here.
 
[1] Survey of 1,037 drivers undertaken by independent market research company, Surveygoo, on behalf of Brake and Direct Line.
 
 
About Brake
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
 
We do this through national campaigns, community education, services for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
 
Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.       
 
About Direct Line
Started in 1985, Direct Line became the first UK insurance company to use the telephone as its main channel of communication. It provides motor, home, travel and pet insurance cover direct to customers by phone or online.
 
Direct Line general insurance policies are underwritten by UK Insurance Limited, Registered office: The Wharf, Neville Street, Leeds LS1 4AZ. Registered in England No 1179980. UK Insurance Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. Direct Line and UK Insurance limited are both part of Direct Line Insurance Group plc. Customers can find out more about Direct Line products or get a quote by calling 0845 246 3761 or visiting www.directline.com

Tags: enforcement police survey