Brake responds to new drug-driving law in Scotland

News from Brake
Tuesday 15 January
 
Scotland’s road safety laws will be strengthened by the introduction of drug-driving limits and roadside testing on 21 October this year, the Scottish Government has announced.
 
Scotland will introduce a zero-tolerance approach to eight drugs most associated with illegal use, including cannabis, heroin and cocaine, with limits set at a level where any claims of accidental exposure can be ruled out. Meanwhile, a list of other drugs associated with medical use will have limits based on impairment and risk to road safety.
 
Drug-driving limits were introduced in England and Wales in 2015.
 
Commenting, Joshua Harris, director of campaigns for Brake said:
 
“Drug-driving is an increasing menace on our roads, putting innocent road users at risk every day with dangerous, impaired driving. A zero-tolerance approach is a great step forward for Scotland but will only be effective if there are enough police, with the right equipment, to enforce the new law.”
 
“At present, only devices which can screen for cannabis and cocaine use are approved to be used by police at the roadside, limiting the ability to detect drug-driving and enforce the law. Priority must be given to the type-approval of roadside screening devices that can detect all banned drugs, helping the police enforce the law.”
 
ENDS
 
About Brake
 
Brake is a national road safety and sustainable transport charity, founded in 1995, that exists to stop the needless deaths and serious injuries that happen on roads every day, make streets and communities safer for everyone, and care for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. Brake promotes road safety awareness, safe and sustainable road use, and effective road safety policies.
We do this through national campaignscommunity educationservices for road safety professionals and employers, and by coordinating the UK's flagship road safety event every November, Road Safety Week. Brake is a national, government-funded provider of support to families and individuals devastated by road death and serious injury, including through a helpline and support packs.
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Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

Tags: enforcement Driving for Zero drug-driving